Criminal Justice

Courses

CJ 204 Criminology 3.0 Credits

Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behavior and societal responses to crime and to crime victims. Students will study theories of crime causation, crime types, ethics of research, data collection and methods of crime prevention and control. Issues such as capital punishment, gun control and restorative justice will be debated.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 206 Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

Criminal Justice is the study of the agencies that apprehend, adjudicate, sanction, and treat criminal offenders. Students will study the history, policies, procedures and issues regarding these agencies. Court and prison visits will give students an opportunity to augment academic knowledge with direct observation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 265 Criminal Investigation 3.0 Credits

The initial crime scene investigation can make or break subsequent crime solving and conviction of offenders. What does one look for? Who has responsibility for the collection of evidence and the resulting chain of custody? Who has authority in cases that involve several states and federal law enforcement?.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 266 Crime Prevention Planning 3.0 Credits

This course examines the current literature on effective crime prevention programming and planning. Students will be expected to be able to analyze physical and social risk factors for criminal events. Students will also explore methodologies for strategic planning and will use this knowledge to develop a crime prevention plan for the campus or a community.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 267 Introduction to Security Studies 3.0 Credits

This course will explore the historical evolution of private security, public policy issues related to privatization of criminal justice systems, legal issues of security and analytic models for security vulnerability assessments. A final project will include an analytically and theoretically sound security assessment of a building or a facility.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 273 Surveillance, Technology and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine current surveillance technologies used by criminal justice agencies and private sector organizations and the laws that regulate government surveillance and protect privacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 274 Sex, Violence & Crime on the Internet 3.0 Credits

This course explores how offenders are adopting computers to commit traditional crimes in a hi-tech manner. Specific attention will be paid to how the Internet has affected the structure of hate groups and the child pornography and sexual predator subcultures. Cyber-stalking and online harassment will also be examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 275 Issues in Domestic Violence 3.0 Credits

Domestic Violence is a major public health problem. This course will describe DV in the context of multiple response systems including health care, police, advocacy, and criminal justice. We will explore how DV affects men, women and children and examine societal conditions that allow DV to occur and continue.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 276 Introduction to Computer Crime 3.0 Credits

This course provides an overview of computer crime. Emphasis will be placed on the legislative responses and policy issues related to computer intrusions and cyber-fraud. Issues encountered when enforcing laws in cyberspace and the public/private sector initiatives for dealing with computer crime will also be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 277 Introduction to Correctional Practices 3.0 Credits

This course will provide insight into corrections through theory, laws and contemporary practices, facilities management, reentry and alternatives to incarceration. Corrections involve the 'treatment and rehabilitation of offenders through a program involving penal custody, parole, and probation' (Merriam-Webster). This course will include site visits, guest lecturers and case analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 278 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3.0 Credits

Law enforcement, generally the first point of contact, is the largest of the three Criminal Justice agencies. A solid understanding of the missions, strategies and controversies of policing is essential to citizens and Criminal Justice students. The reality is more complicated than preventing crimes and catching criminals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 280 Communities and Crime 3.0 Credits

This course is an examination of classical and contemporary theories of the social ecology of communities and how this social ecology relates to crime. Further, we will explore the impact of community development activities on crime outcomes in neighborhoods. We will examine the importance of race and class in forging effective community based development models. Lastly, we will examine specific community based solutions to crime and disorder problems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 282 Community Policing 3.0 Credits

Community Policing, a new law enforcement philosophy, involves partnering with communities to identify and solve problems proactively. We will examine the multi-dimensional strategies necessary for Community Policing to be effective and for it to be significantly more satisfactory for the community policed and those policing.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 289 Terrorism 3.0 Credits

This course will view terrorism from a historical perspective. Various forms of governments and social constructs will be scrutinized as to their impact on human rights issues. Students will study the causes and consequences of domestic and international terrorist activity and discuss the delicate balance between security and freedom.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 290 Crime and Public Policy 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on criminal justice and non-criminal justice policies used to combat crime. Students will use the most recent crime data and explanatory theories on crime to evaluate current policy. A multi-disciplinary approach will be used to develop new policies designed to have a long-lasting impact on crime.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 360 Juvenile Justice 3.0 Credits

Students will learn about the history, development and current status of the juvenile justice system. Philosophical, sociological, psychological, legal and political factors contributing to the changes in the manner in which society processes children and youth who violate social norms will be explored in research articles, legal decision, and theoretical analyses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 362 Gender, Crime and Justice 3.0 Credits

Course examines the different experiences and needs of female criminal justice professionals, crime victims and offenders using field trips, guest experts, videotape, new theories, legislation, policies and discussions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: (CJS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 206 [Min Grade: C]) or (CJS 204 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 204 [Min Grade: C])

CJ 364 Community Corrections 3.0 Credits

Costly, unnecessary and impractical incarceration of every offender emphasizes the importance of community-based alternatives which are more effective and less expensive. Course includes field trips, guest experts, and discussion.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 365 Computer Investigation and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine the techniques used to investigate internet crimes and extract evidence from digital storage devices. Specific attention will be paid to the procedural laws that govern digital forensic techniques and investigations involving electronic evidence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 274 [Min Grade: D] or CJ 276 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 369 Forensic Science Survey Course 3.0 Credits

This course will survey various forensic disciplines with emphasis on their role within the criminal justice system. The course will familiarize students with methods and techniques currently employed in the crime scene processing, drug identifications, trace evidence, bloodstain pattern analysis, entomology, DNA, other disciplines, ethics, and expert testimony. The course is taught by trained in-service forensic scientists.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 372 Death Penalty - An American Dilemma 3.0 Credits

Capital Punishment is a complex and controversial issue. Opinions about the death penalty are rarely grounded in hard evidence. This course will examine the history of the use of capital punishment in America: the case law and the issues which rise from the use of the Ultimate Sanction.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 373 Environmental Crimes 3.0 Credits

An examination of the criminal consequences of the violation of laws, regulations and policies governing clean water, air and toxic substances. Analysis of case studies from a variety of perspectives including crime scene investigations and potential terrorism.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

CJ 374 [WI] Restorative Justice 3.0 Credits

Restorative justice is a paradigm shift in criminal justice in response to the failure of the traditional retributive model to meet the needs of victims, offenders and the community. Programs have developed worldwide often sponsored by governments, others by non-profits, to handle both juvenile and adult criminal offences more effectively. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 375 Criminal Procedure 3.0 Credits

Understanding the historical and contemporary significance of the Bill of Rights especially the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments is critically important in the practice of law and law enforcement. Real life conflicts in the application of constitutional criminal procedure and tensions between due process and crime control will be discussed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 376 Sentencing: The History, Necessity and Morality of Punishment in America 3.0 Credits

The course is an exploration of punishment, its various philosophies, theories and approaches. The costs and outcomes of incarceration as well as alternatives will be examined as well as disparities regarding age, gender, race in our sentencing. A review of the ultimate sanction, the death penalty will complete the course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: C]

CJ 377 Intellectual Property Theft in the Digital Age 3.0 Credits

This seminar focuses on the changing nature of intellectual property theft in the Digital Age. Attention will be paid to legislative solutions for protecting intellectual property and the challenges faced when investigating the theft of intellectual property. Additionally, theoretical explanations to account for intellectual property theft will be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

CJ 378 Science of Forensic Science 3.0 Credits

Students will study actual casework to learn how to apply scientific method to evidence analysis and translation of results to criminal court hearings and trials. In this ONLINE course students will play the virtual role of analyst, gathering crime scene evidence and presenting it at trial.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 102 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 101 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 151 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 151 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 111 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 379 Forensic DNA Analysis 3.0 Credits

An introduction to DNA analysis methods in current forensic testing . Genetics, inheritance, DNA biochemistry are applied to a fluorescent detection technology to produce results using one or more manufactured DNA testing kits. Students will be exposed to actual casework data and as virtual analyst present results to juries and judges.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 104 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 102 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 112 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 380 Special Topics 3.0 Credits

This course will explore current issues and interests in Criminal Justice. The topic will vary each term.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJ 390 [WI] Internships in Criminal Justice 3.0-6.0 Credits

Internships provide opportunities for students to clarify career interests; synthesize prior academic knowledge with direct experience; and sharpen critical thinking, analytical, and observational skills. Direct participation in the criminal justice system allow for testing theory with practice. Learning from and networking with professionals in the field is enhanced. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits

CJ 399 Independent Study 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides a course of independent study in Criminal Justice. Topics for study must be approved in advance of registration by the advisor and the instructor involved.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJ 400 [WI] Critical Issues in Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

The capstone course will be open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. It will serve as an opportunity for them to demonstrate their cumulative learning to the major by looking on the most challenging issues in the field. Students, divided into groups, will research the topics, draft a report and present and defend it before an audience of Criminal Justice students. The knowledge and skills obtained through four years as a Criminal Justice major will be reflected in their work. This course will be a writing intensive course as multiple drafts of their thesis will be reviewed and critiqued before the final report is written and accepted. (Topic will reflect contemporary issues and one subject to choose.).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CJ and classification is Senior.

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