Environmental Science

Master of Science Environmental Science (MSES): 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

Environmental science is a multidisciplinary field in which we try to understand environmental problems and find solutions to them. This field requires understanding of a number of disciplines. 

The program's areas of focus include: ecology, biodiversity, conservation, environmental assessment, and paleoecology-geology. A student may alternatively craft a specialized plan of study outside of these strength areas under the guidance of an academic advisor.

The master's degree may be completed with either a thesis or non-thesis option. Those choosing to prepare a thesis must complete 45.0 credits (up to 12.0 credits may be research). Students choosing the non-thesis option must complete coursework totaling 45.0 credits (6.0 of which may be research). Most courses carry three credits.

Part-time Study

The MS degree may be completed on a part-time basis. Most courses are scheduled in the late afternoon and evening, usually on a rotating basis from year to year. Part-time students should plan to take courses in the appropriate sequence to comply with the necessary prerequisites. Scheduling of course is dependent on student demand and faculty resources; however, most prescribed courses are offered at least once every other year (schedules are published each term). Required courses should be taken at the first opportunity.

Additional Information

For more information, visit the Department of Biodiversity, Earth & Environmental Science website.

Susan Cole is the Graduate Coordinator for Environmental Science. Susan Cole can be reached by telephone at 215.895.2905 or e-mail at coless@drexel.edu.
 

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general entrance requirements for all applicants, entrance to the MS Program in Environmental Science requires a bachelor of science degree in science, mathematics, or engineering. Minimally, students must have completed a year each of calculus, general biology, general chemistry, physics, and, preferably, a semester of organic chemistry.

PhD Program

Applicants to the doctoral program are judged on the basis of academic excellence and the alignment of their research interests with those of the faculty in the department. Prospective PhD students are welcome to contact the program to discuss their research interests.

Additional information about how to apply is available on the Graduate Admissions at Drexel University website.

Degree Requirements: MS in Environmental Science

The Master of Science in Environmental Science (MSES)  program requires three core courses that form the basis for further specialization. Students choose to complete the remainder of the program with elective courses based on interest.

Core Courses
ENVS 501Chemistry of the Environment3.0
ENVS 506Biostatistics3.0
ENVS 511Evolutionary Ecology3.0

Elective Areas

Please see Course Descriptions for a list of Environmental Science (ENVS) electives. Students may also take Environmental Policy (ENVP) and Environmental Engineering (ENVE) courses with prerequisites. Other departmental courses with approval.

Degree Requirements: PhD in Environmental Science

 The following general requirements must be satisfied in order to complete the PhD program in Environmental Science:

  • 90.0 (post-bachelor's) or 45.0 (post-master's) quarter credits
  • qualifying exam
  • establishing a plan of study
  • 3 core courses recommended, not required
  • additional courses dependent on advisor or committee recommendations
  • candidacy exam/approval of dissertation proposal
  • dissertation/thesis
  • defense of dissertation/thesis
  • a graduate research seminar presentation once a year for second, third, and fourth-year students.

Thesis Advisor/Plan of Study

For students admitted without an identified Thesis Advisor, the Thesis Advisor must be selected by the end of Winter term in the first year. All students are asked to submit a Plan of Study (that has been agreed upon by Thesis Advisor and student) by the end of Winter term first year. It is anticipated that the graduate coursework will be completed during the first two years or less. Generally there is no prescribed coursework -- students must take courses needed to complete their research under guidance of an faculty advisor.

Curriculum

The following courses are recommended, but not required:

ENVS 501  Chemistry of the Environment
ENVS 506   Biostatistics
ENVS 511   Evolutionary Ecology

Candidacy Examination

The function of the Candidacy Examination is to test the breadth and the depth of the student's capabilities in their chosen area of study. The graduate student becomes a PhD candidate only after successfully completing the Candidacy Examination and completing 15 or 45 credits (for post-master’s or post-bachelor’s degree students, respectively). The candidacy exam is comprised of three parts whose order will be determined by the Candidacy Committee: written examination (or qualifying exam), dissertation research proposal, and oral examination.

Students entering the program with a master’s degree are expected to complete the candidacy examination by the end of the summer quarter of their first year. Students entering the PhD program with a bachelor’s degree are expected to complete this examination by the end of the summer quarter of their second year.

Thesis/Dissertation and Defense of Thesis/Dissertation

The student will finalize their dissertation only after approval to write is granted by the Dissertation Research Committee. Approval is based upon an evaluation of the breadth and depth of original research being conducted by the student. The dissertation must follow the format specifications set forth in the Drexel’s Office of Research and Graduate Studies. Research conducted for the dissertation must be presented in a lecture open to the public and then defended, privately, before the student's Dissertation Research Committee.

Facilities

Facilities include fully equipped research laboratories in microbiology, ecology, hydrology, and chemistry. Field ecology research augments lab facilities with field-specific equipment, including two boats (14- and 25-foot) and vans with towing capacity. A full range of sampling equipment exists in the department from seine nets, sediment dredges and coring devices, water sampling bottles, flow meters and acoustic tracking devices. Some additional research facilities in environmental biotechnology, chemistry and atmospheric engineering are located in other locations on Drexel's campus.

Among the equipment available for student research are atomic absorption spectrophotometers, UV-visible spectrophotometers, gas-liquid chromatographs, ion chromatograph, ICP-Mass Spectrometer, GC-Mass Spectrometer, high performance liquid chromatographs, total organic carbon analyzer, elemental analyzer for carbon and nitrogen, stable isotope mass spectrometer, high-speed refrigerated centrifuge, nutrient analyzers, and UV photochemical reactor.  In addition, the department and university have various microscopes including a scanning electron microscope (SEM).  Within the department and in the Department of Biology there is a large capacity for genomics including preparatory equipment for DNA extraction and enhancement.

Drexel University is a national leader in the use of computers for educational and research functions. Several facilities on campus are available for student use.

Courses

ENVS 501 Chemistry of the Environment 3.0 Credits

Covers principles of physical and organic chemistry applicable to the study and evaluation of environmental conditions, especially the pollution of air, water, and soil (including chemical changes and reactions in the environment).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 506 Biostatistics 3.0 Credits

Covers measures of biostatistics, including central value and dispersion, sampling and distribution, statistical inference, analysis of variance, regression and correlation, and time series. Emphasizes application.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 511 Evolutionary Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies the basic principles of evolution and ecology, including natural selection, the ecological niche ecological succession, and the food web, and effects of human activities on ecosystems. Views humans as a species.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 528 Conservation Biology 3.0 Credits

This course will detail the loss of biodiversity and explore related issues, including the theories and practices of conservation biology and the solutions currently being formulated to enhance the preservation of species on our planet. The course will explore potential limitations to these strategies and provide an appreciation of the relevance of ethics, economics and politics to biodiversity conservation while promoting the potential for individual action to influence conservation efforts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 538 Biodiversity 3.0 Credits

This course explores major patterns of biodiversity that biologists have documented across the planet. The course begins with an overview of major types of biodiversity, focusing on species diversity, and methods for measuring and analyzing biodiversity. Next it explores major patterns of biodiversity that are fundamental to ecology and conservation, and theories for the causes of biodiversity patterns.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 564 Animal Behavior 3.0 Credits

The mechanisms, ecology and evolution of the activities of animals in relation to their natural environment. Topics include development and control (neutral and hormonal) of behavior, adaptations for survival, feeding, and predator avoidance, strategies of habitat selection, communication, reproduction, and social behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Corequisite: ENVS 565

ENVS 565 Animal Behavior Laboratory 2.0 Credits

An observational study of the behavior of a captive group of social animals at the Philadelphia Zoo including species selection, background research, ethogram construction, 16 hours of quantified observations, analysis of data and written report. Graduate students supervise weekly assignment review sessions, organize peer review sessions and revise the laboratory manual.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Corequisite: ENVS 564

ENVS 575 Invertebrate Paleontology 4.0 Credits

This course focuses on the evolution of hard-bodied invertebrates from the Cambrian period to today. Topics include taxonomy, taphonomy, biostratigraphy, and paleoecology. Natural selection, functional morphology, extinction and adaption are emphasized. The lab focuses on hands-on fossil identification.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 577 Vertebrate Paleontology 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the evolution of vertebrates from the Cambrian Period to today. Topics include cartilaginous and bony fishes, amphibians, turtles, crocodiles, pterosaurs, birds, and mammals. Natural selection, cladistics, functional morphology, adaptation and extinction are emphasized.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 582 Field Botany of the New Jersey Pine Barrens 4.0 Credits

This course focuses on plant identification skills that are necessary to conduct scientific botanical surveys. The vascular flora of the New Jersey Pine Barrens, including rare plant species, is emphasized with special reference to habitat and community analyses. Non-vascular species are examined but not emphasized.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 5 credits
Prerequisites: ENVR 511 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 511 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 583 Ecology of the New Jersey Pine Barrens 4.0 Credits

Course focuses on the ecology of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Students learn field survey methods, identify index species (flora and fauna), perform community analyses, and use equipment for measuring abiotic variables (soil and water). Field exercises focus on key aspects of the regional ecology: fire, soil and water.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 511 [Min Grade: C] or ENVR 511 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 588 Marine Field Methods 4.0 Credits

Course focus is on the ecology of local marine environments. Students learn marine field survey methods, identification of marine organisms, habitat analyses, and use of equipment for measuring abiotic variables. Students sample fish, plankton and invertebrate species aboard the 25 foot Drexel research vessel, Peter Kilham.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 511 [Min Grade: C] or ENVR 511 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 601 Advanced Environmental Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers thermodynamic and kinetic principles and their application to the study of chemical changes and reactions in the water or air environments.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVR 501 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 501 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 605 Atmospheric Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Introduces the principles of atmospheric physics and photochemical kinetics as a prelude to understanding the atmospheric chemical system. Examines the chemistry of the natural atmosphere to prepare for the understanding of how pollutants interact with natural species. Considers pollution of the stratosphere and the troposphere.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVR 501 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 501 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 613 Advanced Population Ecology 3.0 Credits

One of the greatest issues concerning life on Earth and human impact on the planet is whether species will survive or go extinct. This course explores how wild populations change over time and investigates the concepts and quantitative methods used to determine the viability of plant and animal populations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 614 Advanced Community Ecology 3.0 Credits

Community ecology is the study of how populations of organisms interact with each other and the physical environment. Students will investigate the underlying principles that explain and predict interactions among populations of organisms, and how these principles can be used to conserve and manage wild animal and plant communities.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 624 Microbial Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies the relationships of microbes with plants, animals, and the environment, both biotic and abiotic components. Examines the key role of microbes in the functioning of ecosystems affecting decomposition, disease, nutrient cycling, and energy flow. Studies these processes and the role of microbes in the natural functions of ecosystems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVR 516 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 516 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 626 Molecular Ecology 3.0 Credits

Through a combination of lecture, discussion, and computational exercises, students will learn how molecular tools have been used to study genetic variation. They will then learn how these studies have provided answers to previously unanswered questions in fields including ecology, evolution, behavior, conservation, and forensics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 627 Molecular Ecology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

Through a combination of laboratory and computational exercises, students will develop a toolkit for applied molecular studies of ecology and evolution. The course will focus on initiating or continuing a novel research project relating to one of several topics within the field of molecular ecology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 630 Aquatic Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies the relationship between aquatic plants and animals and their environment. Introduces the study of the ecology of lakes, rivers, ponds and streams.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 690 Marine Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies major processes in the marine environment, especially relationships between organisms and the factors that influence their abundance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 692 Ichthyology and Herpetology 3.0 Credits

Many species of fishes, amphibians and reptiles face extirpation from their former ranges and some face total extinction within our lifetime. This course investigates major regional and global issues concerning viability of these organisms and addresses solutions using concepts of population ecology, community ecology, physiological ecology and conservation biology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 700 Evolution 3.0 Credits

Covers historical evidence for and principal mechanism of organic evolution, including the origin of life and new groups of organisms in the past and present, and the genetic basis for evolution. Discusses current research in evolutionary biology and ecology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 708 Environmental GIS 3.0 Credits

This introductory course is technically oriented and will provide a foundational understanding of GIS in an environmental context. Covers GIS principles and practices and applies spatial investigation procedures to analyze geographic data, including mapping and computer systems, attribute and spatial data models, data organization in GIS, GIS data analysis, and future trends for this technology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 710 Physiological Ecology 3.0 Credits

Examines mechanisms by which physiological factors affect and limit the distribution and abundance of animals, including physiological and behavioral thermoregulation, heat and cold tolerance, acclimation, metabolism, osmoregulation and dehydration tolerance, feeding strategies, digestion and feeding patterns, energy and water budgets, toxins, and optimality theory.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 711 Aquatic Toxicology 3.0 Credits

Applies the principles of toxicology to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Includes applications of laboratory and field tests to evaluate aquatic effects, and methods of data analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 712 Biophysical Ecology 3.0 Credits

Covers energy balances and methods of heat transfer in organisms, including convection, conduction, radiation, evaporation, and metabolism, and stead-state and transient energy balances, including mass balances, water uptake, and evaporation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 722 Tropical Ecology 3.0 Credits

Covers the ecology of tropical forests, including biogeography, history, current processes, and effects of economic developments of rain forest and dry forest of the Old and New World tropics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 723 Tropical Field Studies 3.0 Credits

Ecology of tropical rain forests and dry forests. We will explore physical and biological factors that result in formation of these forests, effect of human impacts on these forests, effectiveness of management of these forests and the future of these forests in Costa Rica in the field.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 722 [Min Grade: C] (Can be taken Concurrently)

ENVS 726 Environmental Assessment 3.0 Credits

Examines the National Environmental Act of 1969 and its implementation according to the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality. Discusses air, water, noise, biological cultural, and socioeconomic impacts. Includes methods of impact analysis and means to compare alternative actions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 751 Stream Analysis and Pollution Control 3.0 Credits

Covers the ecological response of natural waters to organic and inorganic pollution. Includes mathematical models for the analysis of the water quality of lakes and streams.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: (ENVR 501 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 501 [Min Grade: C]) and (ENVR 516 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 516 [Min Grade: C])

ENVS 797 Research 20.0 Credits

Requires actual formulation and investigation of a research problem and a written report.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ENVS 799 Independent Study 9.0 Credits

Provides independent study in environmental science.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ENVS 864 Graduate Research Seminar 1.5 Credit

The BEES Graduate Research Seminar is a weekly series of scientific presentations by faculty, graduate students and outside speakers. The seminars are opportunities for learning about and discussing ongoing research in the Department and current issues in biodiversity, earth and environmental science.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 865 Special Topics 9.0 Credits

Covers topics of current interest to faculty and students. Specific topics for each term are announced prior to registration. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ENVS 891 Research Methods I 3.0 Credits

Introduces research methods and literature, procedures for the collection and analysis of data, and preparation of technical papers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 898 Master's Thesis 20.0 Credits

Master's thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ENVS 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 20.0 Credits

Requires each student working on a dissertation to file a written report each term with his or her supervisory committee and the program graduate advisor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science Faculty

Walter F. Bien, PhD (Drexel University) Director, Laboratory of Pinelands Research. Research Professor. Natural resource management, restoration ecology, conservation biology, and New Jersey Pinelands community dynamics.
Donald F. Charles, PhD (Indiana University) Senior Scientist and Section Leader, Phycology Section, Academy of Natural Sciences. Professor. Diatoms as water quality indicators; paleolimnological approaches for inferring change in biology and chemistry of lakes; lake management; assessment of perturbations in aquatic ecosystems due to municipal and industrial effluents, land-use change, acid deposition, eutrophication and climate change.
Ted Daeschler, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Associate Curator of Vertebrate Zoology; Vice President for Systematic Biology and the Library: Academy of Natural Sciences. Associate Professor. Vertebrate fauna of the Late Devonian Period in eastern North America; fossil collecting; systematic work focusing on freshwater vertebrates; nature of early non-marine ecosystems.
Daniel P. Duran, PhD (Vanderbilt University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Phylogeography, systematics and taxonomy, population and conservation genetics , ecological niche modeling, focusing on insect systems to better understand fundamental evolutionary processes and maintain biodiversity.
Jon Gelhaus, PhD (University of Kansas) Curator, Department of Entomology: Academy of Natural Sciences. Professor. Systematic expertise in crane flies (Tipuloidea); phylogenetic reconstruction; historical and ecological biogeography; biodiversity measures and evolution of morphological character systems.
Richard J. Horwitz, PhD (University of Chicago) Senior Scientist; Fisheries Section Leader; Ruth Patrick Chair of Environmental Sciences. Professor. Reproductive ecology, life history and distribution of freshwater fishes; effects of land use, habitat structure and hydrology on population dynamics and species composition in aquatic systems; ecological modeling and biometry; anthropogenic contaminants in fishes.
Dona Jane Huggins, PhD (University of Michigan) Program Director for Online Education. Auxiliary Faculty. Instructional technologies in the biological sciences, student engagement/participation in e-learning, application of electronic teaching methods to toxicology and industrial hygiene courses.
Susan S. Kilham, PhD (Duke University). Professor. Aquatic ecology: phytoplankton; physiological ecology, especially of diatoms in freshwater and marine systems; large lakes; food webs; biogeochemistry.
Danielle Kreeger, PhD (Oregon State University). Assistant Research Professor. Trophic interactions in aquatic ecosystems.
Kenneth J. Lacovara, PhD (University of Delaware). Associate Professor. Vertebrate paleontology of dinosaurs and other animals; Mesozoic terrestrial and coastal ecosystems; preservation of ancient tissues and cells, ancient mangroves, clastic sedimentology, coastal geology, sea level change, evolution and earth history. Field
Tatyana Livshultz, PhD (Cornell University) Assistant Curator of Botany. Assistant Professor. Expertise of the milkweed and dogbane family (Apocynaceae); evolution and species diversity of the genus Dischidia; differences in floral form and function.
Richard McCourt, PhD (University of Arizona) Associate Curator of Botany, Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University; 2010-2012: Program Director, Division of Graduate Education, National Science Foundation. . Professor. Biodiversity, evolution, ecology, and systematic of green algae, specifically charophyte algae.
Jerry V. Mead, PhD (SUNY ESF) Assistant Scientist and Section Leader, Watershed and Systems Ecology Section. Assistant Research Professor. Spatial modeling of aquatic ecosystems; bioenergetics of aquatic invertebrates and fishes; effects of water level management on aquatic organisms; biophysical economics and watershed planning; stream geomorphology and environmental conditions; economics and bioconservation; energy and fisheries.
Mikael O'Connor, MD, PhD (MD, Johns Hopkins University; PhD, Colorado State). Associate Professor. Biophysical and physiological ecology, thermoregulation of vertebrates, ecological modeling.
Sean O'Donnell, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Professor. Tropical ecology, focusing on geographic variation and elevation effects on ecology and behavior of army ants and ant-bird interactions; neurobiology, focusing on brain plasticity and brain evolution in social insects.
Marina Potapova, PhD (Russian Academy of Sciences) Assistant Curator. Assistant Professor. Taxonomy, ecology, and biogeography of freshwater diatoms; methods of quantifying morphological characters of diatom frustules based on geometric morphometrics; systematic of monoraphid freshwater diatoms.
Tracy Quirk, PhD (University of Delaware). Assistant Professor. Vegetation dynamics in coastal wetlands, including factors that influence organic matter accumulation and decomposition and carbon and nutrient cycling; distribution of carbon and nitrogen pools in a salt marsh fringing a coastal lagoon and ecotypic variation of wetland plant species in biomass, carbon and nutrient allocation; establishing long‑term fixed station monitoring of tidal wetlands along the Delaware Estuary and Barnegat Bay.
Ling Ren, PhD (Hamburg University) Research Scientist. Diatom identification and enumeration in stream and river samples; utilizing diatom data for water quality assessment; eutrophication, nutrient enrichment on phytoplankton growth; harmful algal blooms in estuarine and coastal ecosystems.
Barbara Rinkel, PhD (University of Bristol) Research Scientist. Investigating water quality of river, streams, and wetlands; use of soft-bodied algae as water quality indicators; expertise in freshwater soft-bodied algal flora.
Gary Rosenberg, PhD (Harvard University) Pilsbry Chair of Malacology. Professor. Magnitude and origin of species-level diversity in the Mollusca.
David J. Velinsky, PhD (Old Dominion University) Department Head, Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science. Professor. Geochemical cycling of organic and inorganic constituents of sediments and waters; Sedimentary diagenesis of major and minor elements; Isotope biogeochemistry of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in marine and freshwater systems.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Gail Hearn, PhD (Rockefeller University). Professor. The conservation of primate species on Bioko Island in Equatorial Guinea, Africa.
Jacob Russell, PhD (University of Arizona). Assistant Professor. The functional significance and evolutionary histories of symbioses between insects and bacteria.

Emeritus Faculty

John G. Lundberg, PhD (University of Michigan) Chaplin Chair and Curator of Ichthyology. Professor Emeritus. Diversity and diversification of fishes; documenting and interpreting the morphological, molecular, and taxonomic diversity of living and fossil fishes in the interrelated fields of systematic, faunistics and biogeography and paleobiology; exploration and collecting in poorly-known tropical freshwater habitats and regions.
Daniel Otte, PhD (University of Michigan) Senior Curator, Systematics and Evolutionary Biology. Professor Emeritus. Taxonomy and biogeography of Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, katydids and their relatives).
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