Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Science Degree: 182.0 quarter credits

About the Program

Note: Effective Fall 2014, students are no longer being accepted into this program. Please see Criminology and Justice Studies.

Students majoring in criminal justice learn about the most recent scientific developments and the latest technologies relevant to criminal justice. Internships and co-ops provide opportunities for students to synthesize academic learning with direct experience in the criminal justice system.

Issues of crime and justice affect every individual at some point in their lives if only as tax- paying citizens and voters. Criminal justice legislation, policy and decision-making and matters of community safety and well being require well-educated professionals to administer, legislate, communicate, and implement the work of the criminal justice system. Students in Drexel's criminal justice major will be well prepared to assume these roles and responsibilities.

About the Curriculum

On completion of the bachelor's degree, the required courses provide the essential foundation for mid-level employment in the field of criminal justice or for further study in various areas of criminal justice and the law. Students will acquire theoretical and methodological skills as well as courses in written and oral communication so necessary for professional careers in this field. The students majoring in criminal justice will also have a robust foundation in statistics, and computer applications. Additional required courses focus on the areas of forensic sciences, law and political and social sciences.

Program Goals

The goals for the criminal justice program include the following:

  • To provide excellent, cutting edge preparation for students planning to enter graduate study of criminal justice, law and law-related programs.
  • To prepare students for upper level employment in the criminal justice system at local, state and federal levels.
  • To communicate an understanding of crime, criminal behavior and the criminal justice system essential for aware citizens, as voters, taxpayers, planners and decision-makers.

Additional Information

For more information specific to the field of criminal justice, contact:

Robert Kane, PhD
Professor of Criminal Justice
Culture and Communcation

For additional information about the BS in Criminal Justice, please visit the Culture and Communication Department's Criminal Justice page.

 Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on opportunities.

Degree Requirements 

CJ 206Criminal Justice (This course becomes CJS100)3.0
CJ 204Criminology (This course becomes CJS200)3.0
CJS 260Justice in Our Community (New course. ) This is a community-based learning course4.0
PHIL 330Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice3.0

 

General Requirements
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PSCI 100Introduction to Political Science4.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Fine Arts Elective3.0
History Elective3.0
English Elective (any ENGL course over 200-level) 3.0
Math Sequences8.0
Select one of the following:
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Science Sequence8.0
Select one of the following:
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Criminal Justice Core Requirements
Justice Sequence
BLAW 342Criminal Law4.0
CJ 204Criminology3.0
CJ 206Criminal Justice3.0
PHIL 330Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice3.0
Writing/Communication Sequence
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 375 [WI] Grant Writing3.0
Theory Sequence
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory3.0
PSCI 329Theories of Justice3.0
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Criminal Justice Specialization Courses
Select eight of the following:24.0-25.0
Forensics
Forensic Psychology
Cybercrime
Crime and Procedures
White Collar Crime
Constitutional Law I
Politics, Law, & Justice
Other Social Science Electives
Select four of the following:12.0
Social Problems
Sociology of the Family
Wealth and Power
Urban Sociology
Sociology of Deviant Behavior
Special Topics in Sociology
Constitutional Law II
Supreme Court and American Politics
Select one of the following:3.0
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
Intercultural Communication
Race and Ethnic Relations
Electives
Free Electives19.0-25.0
Total Credits182.0


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Note: Effective Fall 2014, students are no longer being accepted into this program. Please see Criminology and Justice Studies.

Sample Plan of Study

Term 1Credits
CJ 206Criminal Justice3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
CHEM 111
or BIO 107
General Chemistry I
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 2
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
SOC 115Social Problems3.0
CHEM 112
or BIO 109
General Chemistry II
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 3
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
CJ 204Criminology3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PSCI 100Introduction to Political Science4.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 4
CJ 2773.0
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
History Elective 3.0
Criminal Justice Specialization Courses*6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 5
CJ 2783.0
CJ 3603.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
MATH 121
or 101
Calculus I
Introduction to Analysis I
4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
CJ 2763.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
MATH 122
or 102
Calculus II
Introduction to Analysis II
4.0
English (ENGL) Course 200-level or Above 3.0
Other Social Science Elective*3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
CJ 3753.0
CJ 3903.0
COM 375 [WI] Grant Writing3.0
UNIV 101The Drexel Experience1.0
Fine Arts Elective 3.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
CJ 3743.0
PSCI 329Theories of Justice3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
SOC 320Sociology of Deviant Behavior3.0
Other Social Science Elective*3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior 
Race and Ethnic Relations 
Intercultural Communication 
Criminal Justice Specialization Courses*6.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
BLAW 342Criminal Law4.0
CJ 3763.0
PHIL 330Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice3.0
Other Social Science Elective*3.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 11
Free Electives 6.0
Criminal Justice Specialization Courses*9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
CJ 4003.0
Criminal Justice Specialization Course*3.0
Free Electives 5.0
Other Social Science Elective*3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Total Credit: 182.0

*

 See degree requirements.

 

Professional Experiences

Students will complete two professional placements. Some placements are paid and others are unpaid. The placements earn students academic credit while providing hands-on learning with criminal justice professionals. The networking aspects of these placements are invaluable for future career development. In addition to the learning experiences, past students have received excellent letters of recommendation for future employment agencies and for graduate and law school admissions.

In recent years, students have been placed in local agencies such as the District Attorney’s Office, the Institutional Law Project, the Juvenile Law Center, the Defendants Association of Philadelphia, the Philadelphia and Bucks County Prison Systems and the Pennsylvania Prison Society, Pennsylvania and New Jersey State Police. Several students have interned and later worked full time at the Eastern State Penitentiary Historical Site and Museum. On the state level, interns have worked with the Board of Probation & Parole and other agencies. At the federal level, The US Customs Service had an agreement to accept cooperative education placements after having been screened by Dr. Hall in her CJ 206 course. Other students have interned at The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Alcohol, Tobacco & Fire Arms (ATF) and students have interned in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Honors Internship Program, a highly selective, nationally competitive program.

Minor in Criminal Justice

Note: Effective Fall 2014, students are no longer being accepted into this program.

Students from any major who are interested in the law, legal issues and the forensic sciences may envision a future connection with the criminal justice system. These students could enhance their career possibilities by adding a minor in criminal justice to their major field of study. 

The minor consists of four required courses and four criminal justice electives chosen from two categories, for a total of 24.0 credits. Students minoring in criminal justice are assumed to have already taken SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology.


Required Courses
CJ 204Criminology3.0
CJ 206Criminal Justice3.0
SOC 320Sociology of Deviant Behavior3.0
Criminal Justice Elective Courses
Category I
Select one of the following:3.0
Race and Ethnic Relations
Intercultural Communication
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
Category II
Select three of the following:9.0
Ethnography of Communication
Journalists, the Courts, and the Law
Social Problems
Sociology of the Family
Introduction to Social Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Forensic Psychology
Total Credits21.0

Courses

CJ 204 Criminology 3.0 Credits

Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behavior and societal responses to crime and to crime victims. Students will study theories of crime causation, crime types, ethics of research, data collection and methods of crime prevention and control. Issues such as capital punishment, gun control and restorative justice will be debated.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 206 Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

Criminal Justice is the study of the agencies that apprehend, adjudicate, sanction, and treat criminal offenders. Students will study the history, policies, procedures and issues regarding these agencies. Court and prison visits will give students an opportunity to augment academic knowledge with direct observation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 265 Criminal Investigation 3.0 Credits

The initial crime scene investigation can make or break subsequent crime solving and conviction of offenders. What does one look for? Who has responsibility for the collection of evidence and the resulting chain of custody? Who has authority in cases that involve several states and federal law enforcement?.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 266 Crime Prevention Planning 3.0 Credits

This course examines the current literature on effective crime prevention programming and planning. Students will be expected to be able to analyze physical and social risk factors for criminal events. Students will also explore methodologies for strategic planning and will use this knowledge to develop a crime prevention plan for the campus or a community.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 267 Introduction to Security Studies 3.0 Credits

This course will explore the historical evolution of private security, public policy issues related to privatization of criminal justice systems, legal issues of security and analytic models for security vulnerability assessments. A final project will include an analytically and theoretically sound security assessment of a building or a facility.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 273 Surveillance, Technology and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine current surveillance technologies used by criminal justice agencies and private sector organizations and the laws that regulate government surveillance and protect privacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 274 Sex, Violence & Crime on the Internet 3.0 Credits

This course explores how offenders are adopting computers to commit traditional crimes in a hi-tech manner. Specific attention will be paid to how the Internet has affected the structure of hate groups and the child pornography and sexual predator subcultures. Cyber-stalking and online harassment will also be examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 275 Issues in Domestic Violence 3.0 Credits

Domestic Violence is a major public health problem. This course will describe DV in the context of multiple response systems including health care, police, advocacy, and criminal justice. We will explore how DV affects men, women and children and examine societal conditions that allow DV to occur and continue.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 276 Introduction to Computer Crime 3.0 Credits

This course provides an overview of computer crime. Emphasis will be placed on the legislative responses and policy issues related to computer intrusions and cyber-fraud. Issues encountered when enforcing laws in cyberspace and the public/private sector initiatives for dealing with computer crime will also be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 277 Introduction to Correctional Practices 3.0 Credits

This course will provide insight into corrections through theory, laws and contemporary practices, facilities management, reentry and alternatives to incarceration. Corrections involve the 'treatment and rehabilitation of offenders through a program involving penal custody, parole, and probation' (Merriam-Webster). This course will include site visits, guest lecturers and case analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 278 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3.0 Credits

Law enforcement, generally the first point of contact, is the largest of the three Criminal Justice agencies. A solid understanding of the missions, strategies and controversies of policing is essential to citizens and Criminal Justice students. The reality is more complicated than preventing crimes and catching criminals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 280 Communities and Crime 3.0 Credits

This course is an examination of classical and contemporary theories of the social ecology of communities and how this social ecology relates to crime. Further, we will explore the impact of community development activities on crime outcomes in neighborhoods. We will examine the importance of race and class in forging effective community based development models. Lastly, we will examine specific community based solutions to crime and disorder problems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 282 Community Policing 3.0 Credits

Community Policing, a new law enforcement philosophy, involves partnering with communities to identify and solve problems proactively. We will examine the multi-dimensional strategies necessary for Community Policing to be effective and for it to be significantly more satisfactory for the community policed and those policing.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 289 Terrorism 3.0 Credits

This course will view terrorism from a historical perspective. Various forms of governments and social constructs will be scrutinized as to their impact on human rights issues. Students will study the causes and consequences of domestic and international terrorist activity and discuss the delicate balance between security and freedom.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 290 Crime and Public Policy 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on criminal justice and non-criminal justice policies used to combat crime. Students will use the most recent crime data and explanatory theories on crime to evaluate current policy. A multi-disciplinary approach will be used to develop new policies designed to have a long-lasting impact on crime.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 360 Juvenile Justice 3.0 Credits

Students will learn about the history, development and current status of the juvenile justice system. Philosophical, sociological, psychological, legal and political factors contributing to the changes in the manner in which society processes children and youth who violate social norms will be explored in research articles, legal decision, and theoretical analyses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 362 Gender, Crime and Justice 3.0 Credits

Course examines the different experiences and needs of female criminal justice professionals, crime victims and offenders using field trips, guest experts, videotape, new theories, legislation, policies and discussions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: D] or CJ 204 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 364 Community Corrections 3.0 Credits

Costly, unnecessary and impractical incarceration of every offender emphasizes the importance of community-based alternatives which are more effective and less expensive. Course includes field trips, guest experts, and discussion.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 365 Computer Investigation and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine the techniques used to investigate internet crimes and extract evidence from digital storage devices. Specific attention will be paid to the procedural laws that govern digital forensic techniques and investigations involving electronic evidence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 274 [Min Grade: D] or CJ 276 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 369 Forensic Science Survey Course 3.0 Credits

This course will survey various forensic disciplines with emphasis on their role within the criminal justice system. The course will familiarize students with methods and techniques currently employed in the crime scene processing, drug identifications, trace evidence, bloodstain pattern analysis, entomology, DNA, other disciplines, ethics, and expert testimony. The course is taught by trained in-service forensic scientists.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 372 Death Penalty - An American Dilemma 3.0 Credits

Capital Punishment is a complex and controversial issue. Opinions about the death penalty are rarely grounded in hard evidence. This course will examine the history of the use of capital punishment in America: the case law and the issues which rise from the use of the Ultimate Sanction.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJ 373 Environmental Crimes 3.0 Credits

An examination of the criminal consequences of the violation of laws, regulations and policies governing clean water, air and toxic substances. Analysis of case studies from a variety of perspectives including crime scene investigations and potential terrorism.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

CJ 374 [WI] Restorative Justice 3.0 Credits

Restorative justice is a paradigm shift in criminal justice in response to the failure of the traditional retributive model to meet the needs of victims, offenders and the community. Programs have developed worldwide often sponsored by governments, others by non-profits, to handle both juvenile and adult criminal offences more effectively. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 375 Criminal Procedure 3.0 Credits

Understanding the historical and contemporary significance of the Bill of Rights especially the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments is critically important in the practice of law and law enforcement. Real life conflicts in the application of constitutional criminal procedure and tensions between due process and crime control will be discussed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 376 Sentencing: The History, Necessity and Morality of Punishment in America 3.0 Credits

The course is an exploration of punishment, its various philosophies, theories and approaches. The costs and outcomes of incarceration as well as alternatives will be examined as well as disparities regarding age, gender, race in our sentencing. A review of the ultimate sanction, the death penalty will complete the course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJ 206 [Min Grade: C]

CJ 377 Intellectual Property Theft in the Digital Age 3.0 Credits

This seminar focuses on the changing nature of intellectual property theft in the Digital Age. Attention will be paid to legislative solutions for protecting intellectual property and the challenges faced when investigating the theft of intellectual property. Additionally, theoretical explanations to account for intellectual property theft will be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

CJ 378 Science of Forensic Science 3.0 Credits

Students will study actual casework to learn how to apply scientific method to evidence analysis and translation of results to criminal court hearings and trials. In this ONLINE course students will play the virtual role of analyst, gathering crime scene evidence and presenting it at trial.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 102 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 101 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 151 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 151 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 111 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 379 Forensic DNA Analysis 3.0 Credits

An introduction to DNA analysis methods in current forensic testing . Genetics, inheritance, DNA biochemistry are applied to a fluorescent detection technology to produce results using one or more manufactured DNA testing kits. Students will be exposed to actual casework data and as virtual analyst present results to juries and judges.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 104 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 102 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 112 [Min Grade: D]

CJ 380 Special Topics 3.0 Credits

This course will explore current issues and interests in Criminal Justice. The topic will vary each term.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJ 390 [WI] Internships in Criminal Justice 3.0-6.0 Credits

Internships provide opportunities for students to clarify career interests; synthesize prior academic knowledge with direct experience; and sharpen critical thinking, analytical, and observational skills. Direct participation in the criminal justice system allow for testing theory with practice. Learning from and networking with professionals in the field is enhanced. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits

CJ 399 Independent Study 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides a course of independent study in Criminal Justice. Topics for study must be approved in advance of registration by the advisor and the instructor involved.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJ 400 [WI] Critical Issues in Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

The capstone course will be open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. It will serve as an opportunity for them to demonstrate their cumulative learning to the major by looking on the most challenging issues in the field. Students, divided into groups, will research the topics, draft a report and present and defend it before an audience of Criminal Justice students. The knowledge and skills obtained through four years as a Criminal Justice major will be reflected in their work. This course will be a writing intensive course as multiple drafts of their thesis will be reviewed and critiqued before the final report is written and accepted. (Topic will reflect contemporary issues and one subject to choose.).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CJ and classification is Senior.

Culture and Communication Faculty

Ronald Bishop, III, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Investigative reporting, sports journalism, journalism history, journalism sourcing patterns, textual narrative and ideological analysis, cultural history of fame.
Joan W. Blumberg, BA (Pennsylvania State University) Coordinator of the Publication Management Program. Instructor. Publishing, electronic publishing, publishing and communications, publishing and mass-media.
Robert J. Brulle, PhD (George Washington University). Professor. Environmental policy and politics, critical theory, marine risk, social movements, environmental sociology.
Karen Cristiano, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Journalism, medical writing, feature writing, copy editing, mass media and society.
Robert D'Ovidio, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. The intersection of computer technology, crime, and the criminal justice system.
Daniela De Pau, PhD (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). Assistant Teaching Professor. Italian cinema, relationship between literature, cinema and other arts, traveling literature, women writers, the tradition of the Comic and the tradition of the Fantastic, autobiography, politics of immigration, cultural identity in contemporary Italy.
Brenda Dyer, MA (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Language acquisition pedagogy, teaching writing, seventeenth and eighteenth century French literature, women writers, translation.
Mary Ebeling, PhD (University of Surrey). Associate Professor. Science and technology studies; emerging technologies and biocapital; media and democratic cultures; radical social movements; sociology of markets; political sociology; and ethnographic methodologies.
Paul Evangelista, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Public relations, communication theory, new technologies in communication (classroom and online); business communication.
Richard Forney Instructor. Broadcast journalism technology and the effects of new technologies on personal and corporate communication skills.
Alexander Friedlander, PhD (Carnegie Mellon University) Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. Associate Professor. Rhetorical theory and practice, document design, writing and technology.
Anthony Glascock, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) Coordinator of the Anthropology Program. Professor. Aging and health, definitions of functionality and impairment, technology and aging, social organization, Ireland, East Africa.
Ernest A. Hakanen, PhD (Temple University) Director of Culture & Communication Graduate Programs. Professor. Telecommunications policy, adolescent media use, communication theory and history, global media, and semiotics.
Julia Hall, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Criminal justice and juvenile justice reform, including community based alternatives to incarceration, correctional education and programming, reentry and reintegration, restorative justice, and issues relating to special needs offenders, including the el
Maria Hnaraki, PhD (Indiana University) Director of Greek Studies. Associate Teaching Professor. Ethnomusicology, modern Greek language, Greek and Cretan culture.
Barbara Jean Hoekje, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of English Language Center. Associate Professor. Sociolinguistic theory, discourse analysis, applied linguistics (language teaching, learning, and testing).
Barbara Hornum, PhD (Bryn Mawr College) Director of Center for Academic Excellence (DCAE). Associate Professor. Comparative gerontology, planned communities, continuing care communities, retirement, faculty development.
Robert J. Kane, PhD (Temple University) Director, Criminal Justice Program. Professor. Police authority and accountability; urban ecology and sociology; violence and public health; police strategies and practices.
Frank Kelley, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Corporate university systems online, power structure of media enterprises, public relations, event planning.
Emmanuel F. Koku, PhD (University of Toronto). Associate Professor. Social network analysis; qualitative/quantitative research; medical sociology; social epidemiology; social demography; sociology of development; communication and information technology; community and urban sociology.
David Kutzik, PhD (Temple University) Coordinator of the Sociology Program. Professor. Sociology and philosophy of science; applied gerontological research; political economy of health care; microprocessor-based assistive technologies to improve case management and increase independent living among frail populations.
Brent Luvaas, PhD (UCLA). Assistant Professor. DIY and independent media production; transnational consumer culture; popular music; new media and mediated subjectivities; youth culture in the US and Indonesia.
Joanna Lyskowicz, MA (UAM Poznan, Poland). Instructor. Comparative linguistics, translation, business Spanish, medical Spanish, modern Spanish literature, XXth cent. Spanish poetry, magical realism in Latin American literature.
Diamantino Machado, PhD (Temple University). Teaching Professor. Globalization, political economy, political sociology, philosophy of social science, postmodernism and social reflection.
Maria delaluz Matus-Mendoza, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. Spanish Linguistic variation in the US; the relationship between language variation and mobility (social and geographical) among the Mexican communities in Mexico and in the United States; second language acquisition; language variation in media.
Jack Maxwell, MS (Saint Joseph 's University). Teaching Professor. Criminal investigations, policing, police administration, domestic violence.
Jordan McClain, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Media framing and music journalism; relationship between television and music; American popular culture; celebrity, consumerism, and consumer behavior; branding, brand positioning, and advertising criticism.
Margaret McClure, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Teaching Professor. Research methods, sociology of the family, deviance, military sociology.
Usha Menon, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Self, identity & personhood, emotional functioning, Hindu morality, gender relations in Hindu society, adult development, popular Hinduism, post-colonial feminism, Hindu religious nationalism and Islamic radicalism.
Alexander Nikolaev, PhD (Florida State University). Associate Professor. Public relations, political communication, organizational communication, mass communication, international communications and negotiations, communications theory.
Anne-Marie Obajtek-Kirkwood, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Professor. French and francophone 20th and 21st century literature, culture and film. Representations of the Occupation (WWII); war; minorities in France; autobiography; feminist issues.
Rakhmiel Peltz, PhD (Columbia University, Linguistics; University of Pennsylvania, Biological Sciences) Director of Judaic Studies Program. Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, social history of Yiddish language and culture, Yiddish culture of Eastern Europe, language planning, language and ethnic identity, language and group memory, aging and ethnicity, history of urban neighbors.
Douglas V. Porpora, PhD (Temple University). Professor. International political economy, culture, social theory, and philosophy of social science.
Robert Powell, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Early and Middle Bronze Age Crete; archaeoastronomy; early state formation; archaeology and anthropology of frontiers; mass communication.
Devon Powers, PhD (New York University). Assistant Professor. Popular music, cultural intermediaries, promotional culture, 20th-century history, journalism studies.
Rachel R. Reynolds, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago). Associate Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, intercultural communication, globalization and the rhetoric of community, political economy of immigration, race and ethnicity, new African immigrants in the United States, Igbo studies.
Cynthia Reed Rickards, MS (St. Joesph's University) Criminal Justice Program. Assistant Teaching Professor. On-line pedagogy; service-learning pedagogy; juvenile justice; domestic violence.
David Ridgway, MS (St. Joseph's University). Instructor. Deviant behaviors, social problems.
Rosemary Rys Instructor. Public relations and marketing.
Simone Schlichting-Artur, EdD (University of Pennsylvania) Assistant Department Head, Culture and Communication. Teaching Professor. International business communication (Germany and the U.S.), public health policy and languages, German post-war history through film and literature, development of writing assessment tools for German minor.
Mimi Sheller, PhD (New School for Social Research) Director of the Mobilities Research and Policy Center at Drexel University. Professor. Sustainable mobility and mobility justice: new cultures and infrastructures of travel, transport, mobile communication, and urbanism; Caribbean Studies: history, culture and political theory of the region, including intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class.
Natsumi Shor Assistant Teaching Professor. Business and professional Japanese; Japanese film and culture; interrelation between Japanese language to the nation’s culture and thought.
Wesley Shumar, PhD (Temple University) Department Head, Culture and Communication. Professor. Ethnography of cyberspace, online learning communities, political economy of higher education, globalization, activity theory, semiotics, critical realism, psychoanalysis, identity and the self.
Diane Sicotte, PhD (Arizona State University). Associate Professor. Sociology of environmental injustice: inequalities in the citing of environmental hazards; community-based research in neighborhoods dealing with industrial hazards; sociology of the environment; urban sociology; social inequalities.
Lawrence Souder, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technical writing, communication ethics.
Allan Stegeman, MA (University of Houston) Coordinator of the Communication Program. Teaching Professor. Communication, technology and mass media, video.
Robert Stokes, PhD (Rutgers University) Coordinator, Environmental Policy Program. Associate Professor. Economic and community development, sustainability planning and governance, urban planning and public health, public security and violence prevention.
Judith Storniolo, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Teaching Professor. Historical and comparative linguistics, Mesoamerican languages and culture, applied anthropology, public policy, oral traditions and narratives, ideology and ritual, Mesoamerican ethnohistory; and pre-Columbian literature.
Asta Zelenkauskaite, PhD (Indiana University). Assistant Professor. Social media; user-generated content; computer-mediated communication; interactivity; active audience analysis; mobile communication; gender and online identity; prosumer culture; internet of things; quantitative/qualitative research.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Michelle Sahl, PhD, MEd, MBA, MBE (The University of the Sciences in Philadelphia). Assistant Professor. Health management and policy: management and leadership of health services organizations, urban health, and the history of health care systems.
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