Information Systems

Bachelor of Science Degree in Information Systems (BSIS): 188.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The iSchool, College of Information Science and Technology offers a Bachelor of Science in Information Systems (BSIS) to meet the growing demand for individuals skilled in the development and management of information systems. This forward-looking program for undergraduates offers a solid background in liberal arts and sciences as well as the skills and knowledge needed to design, create, manage, and effectively use modern information systems.

The information systems curriculum has no single application focus. It is directed to the art and science of managing information in all application environments. Students learn how to determine information needs, design appropriate information systems, manage those systems, and measure the systems’ performance. The emphasis is on the users of computers, and on building professional-level information systems skills.To further emphasize the business aspect of the degree, the BSIS curriculum includes a built in business minor.

The BSIS is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC) of ABET.

BS in Information Systems Program Outcomes

The program enables students to achieve, by the time of graduation:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  • An ability to analyze a problem, identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
  • An understanding of processes that support the delivery and management of information systems within a specific application environment.

Degree Requirements

University and College Requirements
COOP 101Career Management and Professional Development0.0
UNIV I101The Drexel Experience2.0
or INFO 120 IST Seminar for Transfer Students
Information Systems Requirements
INFO 101Introduction to Information Technology3.0
INFO 105Introduction to Informatics3.0
INFO 108Foundations of Software3.0
INFO 110Human-Computer Interaction I3.0
INFO 151Web Systems and Services I3.0
INFO 152Web Systems and Services II3.0
INFO 153Applied Data Management3.0
INFO 154Software System Construction3.0
INFO 200Systems Analysis I3.0
INFO 210Database Management Systems3.0
INFO 215Social Aspects of Information Systems3.0
INFO 324Team Process and Product3.0
INFO 330Computer Networking Technology I4.0
INFO 333Introduction to Information Security3.0
INFO 355Systems Analysis II3.0
INFO 420 [WI] Software Project Management3.0
INFO 424Team Project Practicum3.0
INFO 425 [WI] Design Problem I3.0
INFO 426 [WI] Design Problem II3.0
Information Systems Electives *19.0
Natural Science Sequence 8.0-9.0
Select one of the following sequences:
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry II
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry II
General Physics I
   and General Physics II
Fundamentals of Physics I
   and Fundamentals of Physics II
BIO 107
  & BIO 108
  & BIO 109
  & BIO 110
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
   and Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
   and Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
   and Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
BIO 122
  & BIO 124
  & BIO 126
Cells and Genetics
   and Evolution & Organismal Diversity
   and Physiology and Ecology
Weather I: Climate and Global Change
   and Weather II: Analysis and Forecasting
Applied Cells, Genetics & Physiology
   and Applied Chemistry
   and Applied Physics **
Mathematics Requirements
Select one of the following sequences:12.0
Introduction to Analysis I
   and Introduction to Analysis II
   and Discrete Computational Structures
Calculus I
   and Calculus II
   and Discrete Computational Structures
Arts/Humanities Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
PHIL 111Propositional Logic3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
Arts/Humanities elective **3.0
Behavioral Science Requirements
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
PSY 330Cognitive Psychology3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
or ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Diversity
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 350Research Methods II3.0
Behavioral Science Electives6.0
Business Minor Requirements (See Minor Requirements below)24.0-32.0
Students not selecting a business minor are still required to take STAT 201.
Free Electives9.0-20.0
Total Credits188.0

*

Any non-required INFO course

**

Any non-required course in COM, HIST, ENGL, GREC, PHIL, PSCI, ARTH, FMVD, VSST, and WRIT or any foreign language course.

Any non-required course offered by the AFAS, ANTH, PSY, SOC or WMST departments.

 

Business Minor Requirement

In addition to taking STAT 201, students complete the requirements for one of the following business minors:

 

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study  

5 YR UG Co-op Concentration

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
INFO 101Introduction to Information Technology3.0
INFO 108Foundations of Software3.0
MATH 121
or 101
Calculus I
Introduction to Analysis I
4.0
UNIV I101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
MATH 122
or 102
Calculus II
Introduction to Analysis II
4.0
INFO 151Web Systems and Services I3.0
COOP 101***Career Management and Professional Development0.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
INFO 105Introduction to Informatics3.0
INFO 110Human-Computer Interaction I3.0
INFO 152Web Systems and Services II3.0
MATH 180Discrete Computational Structures4.0
UNIV I101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 4
INFO 153Applied Data Management3.0
INFO 200Systems Analysis I3.0
INFO 333Introduction to Information Security3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 101
or ANTH 101
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Cultural Diversity
3.0
 Term Credits18.0
Term 5
INFO 154Software System Construction3.0
INFO 210Database Management Systems3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
SOC 350Research Methods II3.0
Information Systems (INFO) Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
INFO 324Team Process and Product3.0
INFO 355Systems Analysis II3.0
PHIL 111Propositional Logic3.0
Business Elective 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
INFO 215Social Aspects of Information Systems3.0
INFO 330Computer Networking Technology I4.0
PSY 330Cognitive Psychology3.0
Information Systems (INFO) Elective 3.0
Business Elective 4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 8
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
STAT 201Introduction to Business Statistics4.0
Free Elective 3.0
Information Systems (INFO) Elective 3.0
Science Sequence Course 1*4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 9
Science Sequence Course 2*4.0
Business Electives8.0
Information Systems (INFO) Elective 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 10
INFO 420 [WI] Software Project Management3.0
INFO 424Team Project Practicum3.0
Business Elective 4.0
Behavioral Science Elective 3.0
Information Systems (INFO) Elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 11
INFO 425 [WI] Design Problem I3.0
Free Elective 4.0
Behavioral Science Elective 3.0
Business Elective 4.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 12
INFO 426 [WI] Design Problem II3.0
Free Electives 9.0
Arts and Humanities Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Total Credit: 188.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.

***

COOP 101 is taken either winter or spring depending on co-op cycle.  Please consult your advisor for additional information.




Co-op/Career Opportunities

Co-Op Options

Two co-op options are available for this program:

  • 5-year/3 co-op
  • 4-year/1 co-op

The following list is a sample of recent co-op job titles and employers:

  • Applications Architect, Aetna
  • e-Communications Intern, Airgas
  • PC Network Support, Aramark
  • Information Systems Intern, Campbell's Soup
  • Distributed WAN Support Co-op, Cigna
  • Network Services, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Programmer/Analyst, Independence Blue Cross
  • Information Management Co-op, Johnson & Johnson
  • Database Developer, Princeton Plasma Physics
  • Website Developer, QVC
  • Shared Services Co-op, Wyeth

Career Opportunities

The demand for information systems professionals continues to be strong. Graduates find careers in a number of areas, including designing information systems, leading project teams, planning, developing, and marketing information systems. Most information systems students enter the professional world right after graduation, but some continue their studies in advanced information technology programs.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Dual/Accelerated Degrees

The iSchool, College of Information Science and Technology offers a BS/MS Accelerated Degree program designed to allow students to complete both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree along with a cooperative educational experience within the traditional five years.

Students accepted in this program can combine any of the information science and technology bachelor's and master's degree programs as well as other options:

For more information on the criteria for entering this program, visit the BS/MS Accelerated Degree page on the College's website.

Minor in Information Systems

The information systems minor is available to all University students in good standing, with the exception of students already majoring in information systems, or who are majoring in information technology or informatics.


Required Courses
INFO 101Introduction to Information Technology3.0
INFO 110Human-Computer Interaction I3.0
INFO 200Systems Analysis I3.0
INFO 210Database Management Systems3.0
INFO 330Computer Networking Technology I4.0
INFO 355Systems Analysis II3.0
Two information system electives *6.0
Total Credits25.0

 

*

 An additional 6 credits or more are to be chosen from other course offerings in information systems pertinent to the student’s overall program of study. Guidance in selecting these electives will be provided by staff and faculty of the College of Information Science and Technology.


Facilities

Drexel University Libraries

Drexel University Libraries is a learning enterprise, advancing the University’s academic mission through serving as educators, supporting education and research, partnering with researchers, and fostering intentional learning outside of the classroom. For students and faculty in The iSchool, College of Information Science and Technology, the Libraries provide a collection of over 600,000 books, periodical literature from over 35,000 journal titles residing in over 460 databases. All fields of inquiry are covered, including: library and information science, computer science, systems engineering, information systems, and technology. Resources are available online or in-person at W. W. Hagerty Library. The Libraries also make available laptop and desktop PC and Mac computers, printers and scanners, spaces for quiet work or group projects and designated 24/7 spaces. Librarians and library staff, including a liaison librarian for information science and technology, are available for individual research consultations. 

 iCommons

Located in Room 106 of the Rush Building, the College’s iCommons features desktop computers, a wireless/laptop area, free black and white printing, more collaborative space for its students and a furnished common area. There is a fully equipped conference room for student use with a 42” display and videoconferencing capabilities. The iCommons provides technical support to students, faculty, and administrative staff. In addition, the staff provides audio-visual support for all presentation classrooms within the Rush Building. Use of the iCommons is reserved for all students taking iSchool courses.

The computers for general use are Microsoft Windows and Macintosh OSX machines with appropriate applications which include the Microsoft Office suite, various database management systems, modeling tools, and statistical analysis software. Library related resources may be accessed at the iCommons and through the Hagerty Library. The iSchool is a member of the Rational SEED Program which provides cutting-edge CASE and project management software for usage in the iCommons and iSchool classrooms.  The iSchool is also a member of the Microsoft Academic Alliance known also as “DreamSpark” which allows students free access to a wide array of Microsoft software titles and operating systems.

 iSchool students can access Drexel’s mail server from within the iCommons. The iCommons, student labs, and classrooms have access to networked databases, print and file resources within the College, and the Internet via the University’s network. Email accounts, Internet and BannerWeb access are available through the Office of Information Resources and Technology.

 Other Facilities

The College maintains 6 classrooms equipped for audio-visual presentation. These rooms typically contain a networked PC, HD video player, ceiling mounted projectors, and other equipment for presentations and demonstrations. Four of these classrooms are fully equipped to function as laptop computing labs for networking, programming and database-related projects.

Information Technology Lab

In 2013, the iSchool redesigned its laboratory in support of the degree program in Information Technology. This lab consists of enterprise class information technology hardware that students would encounter in industry positions. The hardware includes 20 high powered workstations that are available to students and specialized networking lab simulation software. The hardware is networked and reconfigurable utilizing multiple virtual technologies as needed for the various classes the laboratory supports. In addition a special system has been built into to the classroom to allow for conversion into a standard laptop computing lab utilizing motorized monitor lifts that allow the monitors and keyboards to recess into the desk.

Alumni Garden

The Rush Building’s Alumni Garden provides additional collaborative space for students, alumni and faculty. The Garden features wireless networking, tables with built-in power outlets, accessible covered patio and balconies and a bicycle rack. The Alumni Garden may be reserved for Drexel events.

Courses

INFO 101 Introduction to Information Technology 3.0 Credits

Introduces the basic knowledge and techniques required to use computing effectively in organizations. Explores information systems, information technology and software concepts with an emphasis on how computing can be used to help organizations meet their goals.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 105 Introduction to Informatics 3.0 Credits

Considers the field of informatics as the application of information and computer sciences to a specific domain. Focuses on the three components on informatics: information, users, and information and communication technologies. Topics include information needs, user groups, social media, technology evolution and diffusion of innovation.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 108 Foundations of Software 3.0 Credits

Provides students with fundamental concepts about software and software representation. Topics include software and database representation, development environments, and techniques for designing, coding, testing and deploying software systems. Introduces programming concepts and activities using pair programming activities.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 110 Human-Computer Interaction I 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the student to the study of computer-based user interfaces. It presents a user-interface layout and design, types and usage of interaction techniques, building a consistent look and feel throughout the interface and how to evaluate designs with users. Centered focus in evaluation of computer interfaces. It teaches the basic principles of user analysis and interface evaluation and gives a practical introduction to ergonomics.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 111 Informatics Design Workshop I 3.0 Credits

Provides students with an opportunity to explore design practice through hands on experiences with contemporary prototyping platforms and methods. Introduces students to design as a component of informatics.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 110 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 112 Informatics Design Workshop II 3.0 Credits

Builds on INFO 111 by providing students with an opportunity for open-ended exploration of human-centered systems design practice through a freshman design project. Design groups work with their instructor to develop an initial concept into a design deliverable.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 111 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 120 IST Seminar for Transfer Students 2.0 Credits

Introduces students to academic and co-curricular aspects of university life. Includes academic functions such as writing, reading, and studying skills and co-curricular functions such as campus resources, activities, and social programs. Aids in the transition to student life and is designed to help each student achieve academic and personal success.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 140 Information Systems Laboratory I 1.0 Credit

Provides hands-on experience with a variety of software products basic to current information systems. Covers products that support personal productivity in organizing, analyzing and presenting information. Addresses both local processing on personal computers and creation and use of information on the Internet.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 101 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 150 Ubiquitous Information Technologies 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to computing as an integral part of life. Includes topics such as mobile computing, smart devices, sensors, location awareness, and the internet of things. Provides concepts and terminology combined with hands-on experiences constructing applications on mobile or other small computing devices.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 108 [Min Grade: D] or CS 164 [Min Grade: D] or CS 131 [Min Grade: D] or SE 101 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 151 Web Systems and Services I 3.0 Credits

Introduces technologies used to build leading-edge application systems and services on the World Wide Web. Coverage includes a selection of Web components such as make-up and scripting languages and frameworks for building systems. Introduces Web programming using pair or small team programming activities.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 108 [Min Grade: D] or API2 079

INFO 152 Web Systems and Services II 3.0 Credits

Explores techniques used to build leading-edge application systems on the World Wide Web. Topics include Web server components of Web applications, and basic database processing. Includes Web programming using pair or small team programming activities.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 151 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 153 Applied Data Management 3.0 Credits

Explores technologies used to gather, organize, store, and retrieve data in various forms. Focuses on using databases and other information management components in software systems. Topics include database servers, data management for Web applications, and data structures. Includes data management software development using pair or small team programming activities.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 108 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 154 Software System Construction 3.0 Credits

Introduces considerations that make large software systems challenging to design, build, and maintain. Topics include coding standards and documentation, program architecture, verification, software evolution, and managing large software systems. Includes software modification and development using pair and team programming.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 152 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 200 Systems Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Study of the principles, practices and tools of information systems analysis and design. Emphasis on learning pragmatic aspects of working as a systems analyst and employing the tools of systems analysis and design.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 101 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 203 Information Technology for Engineers 3.0 Credits

Provides an introduction to relational system analysis and design and computer networking for engineering students. Covers requirements gathering, development of data flow diagrams and entity-relationship diagrams, and fundamental protocols for TCP/IP networking and routing.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 204 Nursing Informatics 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to examine technology and tools of the Internet and World Wide Web with a focus on the use of cyber technology and selected computer applications. The automation of data management through information systems, expert systems, and telecommunication, and the impact of these technologies on nursing administration, education, practice and research are addressed in the context of nursing informatics. Actual problem-solving and mini-design projects on how computerization and automation can improve the efficiency of nursing care delivery will be emphasized.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is NURS.
Prerequisites: NURS 100 [Min Grade: D] and NURS 102 [Min Grade: D] and CS 161 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisites: NURS 200, NURS 201

INFO 205 [WI] Strategic Uses of Information Systems 3.0 Credits

Familiarizes students with basic business problems and operations and provides an understanding of how information systems can be used to benefit organizations. Also introduces students to the pitfalls of developing and implementing information systems in organizations and helps students improve critical thinking skills. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: INFO 101 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 210 Database Management Systems 3.0 Credits

Focuses on how to design databases for given problems, and how to use database systems effectively. Topics include database design techniques using the entity-relationship approach, techniques of translating the entity-relationship diagram into a relational schema, relational algebra, commercial query languages, and normalization techniques.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 101 [Min Grade: D] or SE 210 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 215 Social Aspects of Information Systems 3.0 Credits

Introduces social issues involved in information systems design and use, e.g., personal computing, telecommuting, computers in education, the privacy and security of stored and transmitted information, and information ownership. Explores the interaction of high technology, employment, and class structure.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 105 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 216 Issues in Information Policy 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to the fundamentals of information policy, through examination of particular issues such as: privacy, intellectual property, access, and security. Students will gain an understanding of the historical foundations of information policy, read and evaluate information policies, discuss key components of information policies, and create an information policy for an organization or government entity.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

INFO 220 Geographic Information Science 3.0 Credits

Explores the creation, distribution and growth of geospatial data, highlighting their uses and misuses. Structured as an applications-based course where students learn how geospatial technologies are used to turn data into maps, tables and imagery through hands-on exercises and laboratory work.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

INFO 240 Introduction to Data Science 3.0 Credits

“Data Science” encompasses skills required for data intensive work. Students will deliver data science products and services through analysis, data transformation and data access techniques. The assignments will involve web programming, statistics, and the ability to manipulate data sets with code, following examples provided.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

INFO 250 Information Visualization 3.0 Credits

Introduces the foundation and the state of the art of information visualization. Explores and reflects on the design, application, and evaluation of a diverse range of information systems. Demonstrates how a number of common types of information can be visually, intuitively and interactively represented. Provides a first-hand experience of visualizing a variety of realistic data types.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 300 Information Retrieval Systems 3.0 Credits

The theoretical underpinnings of information retrieval are covered to give the student a solid base for further work with retrieval systems. Emphasis is given to the process of textual information for machine indexing and retrieval. Aspects of information retrieval covered include document description, query formulation, retrieval algorithms, query matching, and system evaluation.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 105 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 110 [Min Grade: D] and (CS 260 [Min Grade: D] or CS 133 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 153 [Min Grade: D] or SE 103 [Min Grade: D])

INFO 310 Human-Computer Interaction II 3.0 Credits

Introduces the student to interactive computer system design. Teaches some of the basic approaches to task analysis, design, and evaluation of interactive computer systems. Applies these design principles in the development of the interface to an interactive computer system.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 110 [Min Grade: D] or SE 210 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 320 Server Technology I 4.0 Credits

Addresses information systems that have server-based architectures. Introduces students to basic concepts of servers and server-based architectures. Discusses dependence on features and capabilities of the underlying operating system. Reviews concepts of operating system, their architectures, and services. Discusses the client-server and various client-server architectures.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: INFO 101 [Min Grade: D] and (CS 131 [Min Grade: D] or CS 164 [Min Grade: D] or CS 171 [Min Grade: D] or SE 101 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 151 [Min Grade: D])

INFO 321 Server Technology II 4.0 Credits

Presents details of specific server platforms used to provide services to information systems applications. Prepares students to apply server technologies to information systems problems.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: INFO 320 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 322 Server Technology III 4.0 Credits

Continues the study of server platform technologies for information systems applications. Prepares students to apply a wide range of server technologies to information systems problems.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 321 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 324 Team Process and Product 3.0 Credits

Provides hands-on experience with working in small teams to apply processes and produce products typical of current best practices in computing and information technology organizations. Allows students to develop an integrated understanding of project life cycle phases. Examines issues of team organization and operation, problem solving, and communication.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 153 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 200 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 330 Computer Networking Technology I 4.0 Credits

Presents the fundamentals of data communications and networking technologies. Focuses on the broad foundational coverall of key technologies and key concepts in network planning, design, and management. Major topics include network models, data and voice communications, local-area and wide-area technologies, IP networks and their applications and internetworking emphasizing the Internet.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: CS 171 [Min Grade: D] or CS 132 [Min Grade: D] or SE 102 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 152 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 331 Computer Networking Technology II 4.0 Credits

Focuses on design, construction and use of modern networks and internetworks. Prepares students to successfully create and operate modern secure networks. Major topics include LAN design and construction, internetwork architecture, WAN connectivity, security, virtual private networks and network operation in real-world environments.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 330 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 333 Introduction to Information Security 3.0 Credits

Introduction to information security in modern organizations. Examines what information security is, and what motivates organizations to consider information security as a high priority. Introduces legal, ethical and professional issues, risk management, security planning, security technologies, and security implementation and maintenance.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

INFO 336 Distributed Systems Security 3.0 Credits

Study of the principles, practices, and techniques to secure distributed applications, information and the infrastructure of distributed information systems. Topics include security planning, policies and models, threats and attacks, and the use and integration of distributed system security mechanisms for confidentiality, authentication, access control, and intrusion detection.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 330 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 340 Programming Internet Information Systems I 3.0 Credits

This is a hands-on course on programming Internet information systems with an object-oriented programming language, currently Java. The course emphasizes programming practice. It covers fundamental concepts such as object-oriented programming, client-server programming, multi-threaded programming, graphical user interface design, and application development.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CS 171 [Min Grade: D] or CS 132 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 152 [Min Grade: D] or SE 102 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 341 Programming Internet Information Systems II 3.0 Credits

Continues to develop design and programming skills for the development of Internet information systems. Studies and compares various web servers, applications servers, and different server-side programming languages. Emphasizes issues related to object-oriented design and server-side programming.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 340 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 350 Visual Analytics 3.0 Credits

Introduces the aims, principles, and practical tools of visual analytics for analytic reasoning and decision making. Characterizes key issues concerning with uncertainty, incomplete and conflict information. Examines the role of interactive visual analytic reasoning processes. Provides opportunities to use advanced interactive visual analytic tools.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: INFO 250 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 355 Systems Analysis II 3.0 Credits

A project-oriented course that discusses software engineering and advanced techniques of requirements modeling, prototyping and software design, particularly utilizing object-oriented techniques. The course builds upon Systems Analysis I, requiring students to apply their knowledge of systems analysis tools and techniques.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 210 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 200 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 360 Language Processing 3.0 Credits

Study of the problems and techniques of processing natural language. Introduces theory of spoken language and how it differs from theories of computer-generated natural language. Includes language pattern recognition and syntactic inference, and semantic networks.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 210 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 200 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 365 Database Administration I 3.0 Credits

Database Administration is a continuation of Database Management Systems, and includes the following: advanced ERD techniques, database management system internals and advanced elements of the SQL language, as well as stored procedures and triggers, specifically as demonstrated in the Oracle implementation.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 210 [Min Grade: D] and (CS 171 [Min Grade: D] or CS 132 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 153 [Min Grade: D] or SE 102 [Min Grade: D])

INFO 366 Database Administration II 3.0 Credits

Introduces the principles and practices of database administration, particularly as they apply to commercial-grade relational database management systems. The course will include, but not be limited to, installation, systems tuning, application tuning, security, user management, backup and recovery. To this end, internals of RDBMSs will be discussed, using major commercial RDBMSs as examples. Distributed database issues will also be discussed. As time permits, other advanced issues will be addressed, such as issues of object and object-relational databases.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 365 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 370 Artificial Intelligence for Information Systems 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the field of artificial intelligence (AI). Basic concepts, principles, and techniques used to achieve the goals of AI are studied. Examples and applications are specific to information systems.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 108 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 371 Data Mining with Machine Learning 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to basic data mining approaches using machine learning tools. Focuses on machine learning algorithms for information inference and knowledge discovery from data. Covers major applications in data/text/web processing, analysis and mining.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: STAT 201 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 373 Digital Forensics 3.0 Credits

Provides an introduction to the collection, analysis, presentation, and preservation of digital evidence according to methodologies defined by forensic science to fulfill the needs of the legal and law enforcement communities. Introduces systems understanding as an important tool for digital forensic investigation of crimes that use information technology.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 210 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 355 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 375 Introduction to Information Systems Assurance 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the problem of security for modern information systems. Provides an overview of threats, both human and computer, to the security of an organization's data and information resources. Explores how systems may be made less vulnerable and how to respond. Examines issues of personal security in an electronic world.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 200 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 330 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 399 Independent Study 2.0-12.0 Credits

Requires approval of advisor, supervising faculty member and college. BSIS majors may take a maximum of 6 credits of independent study. Any exception to this maximum must be approved in advance by the student's advisor. Independent study on a topic selected by the student. Independent study is supervised by a faculty member and guided by a plan of study developed by the student in a term prior to the term in which the independent study is pursued.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

INFO 404 Nursing Informatics for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Completion 3.0 Credits

Designed for registered nurses in the RN-BSN completion program. Examines computer applications, technology, internet tools, and focuses on health care informatics context for data management, information systems and telecommunications in nursing administration, education and practice. Problem solving and mini-design projects related to increased efficiency in nursing care delivery.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is NUOL.

INFO 405 Social and Collaborative Computing 3.0 Credits

Examines selected human, social and technical issues and concepts of computer-supported cooperative work, computer-supported collaborative learning and social networking. Topics include: the way that groups work in the networked organization; analysis and design of groupware; social networking and community-learning technologies; and future directions of these technologies.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 310 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 410 Information Technology Infrastructure 3.0 Credits

Presents methods for evaluating and selecting information technologies and planning technology implementation. Emphasizes consideration of needs and issues of the organization and individuals served by the technology. Also addresses issues in management of served by the technology. Also addresses issues in management of technology after initial installation including service planning, maintenance, and evolution.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore

INFO 415 Information Technology Services 3.0 Credits

Introduces issues in management and delivery of IT services. Addresses needs and approaches to operational support including providing services, help desks, online support, documentation, and user training. Examines approached to defining, measuring, and analyzing service and support quality.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore

INFO 420 [WI] Software Project Management 3.0 Credits

The objective of this course is to study project management in the context of software systems development. The course will cover the processes, contexts, metrics, planning and management concerns of managing projects for modern software systems. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: (INFO 200 [Min Grade: D] or SE 210 [Min Grade: D]) and (CS 172 [Min Grade: D] or CS 265 [Min Grade: D] or INFO 153 [Min Grade: D] or SE 103 [Min Grade: D])

INFO 424 Team Project Practicum 3.0 Credits

Provides hands-on experience with software systems development in a controlled environment. Student work in small teams to create a software product selected by the instructor. Activities include requirements specification, test specification, design, and software construction. Allows students to develop an integrated understanding of software life-cycle phases.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 200 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 324 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 425 [WI] Design Problem I 3.0 Credits

This course is an independent project in which student teams design and implement information systems under faculty guidance. Possible projects include (but are not limited to) information technology areas such as databases, web-based systems, collaborative systems, user interfaces, and expert systems. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: INFO 420 [Min Grade: D] and INFO 424 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 426 [WI] Design Problem II 3.0 Credits

This course is a continuation of INFO 425. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: INFO 425 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 435 Information Services 3.0 Credits

Examines electronic services that deliver "published" information to an organization from external sources. Relates these services to functions such as planning, marketing, and research. Shows ways of monitoring the organization's larger environments, such as the economy, government, competitors, and new technologies. This course introduces students to the core concepts of information services as they apply to the essential techniques for retrieving, analyzing, organizing and presenting information. The skills learned in this course are transferable to any information seeking activity whether it is in a large research and development lab, or a small start-up company. The overall goal of this course is that upon completion, each student can produce a systematic and accurate method for recovering, analyzing, and disseminating needed information in any setting.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: INFO 105 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 440 Social Media Trend Spotting 3.0 Credits

Explores social trend spotting to analyze, understand, visualize and present information from social media feeds, which reflect emerging social, organizational and cultural trends. Students will analyze traces from social media, bespoke discussion forums and virtual organization portals to discern the relationship between online behavior and underlying social phenomena.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 240 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 450 Expert Consultant Systems 3.0 Credits

Introduces the basic concepts, techniques, and tools involved in the development of information systems based on human expertise. The course discusses the identification of expert system projects, knowledge acquisition, architectures of expert systems, inference, database and procedural considerations, verification and validation of expert systems. Provides hands-on experience in developing expert systems using an expert system programming language.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: INFO 370 [Min Grade: D]

INFO 480 Special Topics in Information Systems 4.0 Credits

Selected topics of interest to students in information systems. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

College/Department: College of Information Science & Technology
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Information Science and Technology Faculty

Denise E. Agosto, PhD (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey). Associate Professor. Information behavior, public libraries, gender, children, young adults, multicultural materials.
Larry Alexander, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Research Professor. Executive in Residence. Large scale modeling and simulation, pattern recognition, the future of information technology.
Yuan An, PhD (University of Toronto, Canada). Associate Professor. Conceptual modeling, schema and ontology mapping, information integration, knowledge representation, requirements engineering, healthcare information systems, and Semantic Web.
Norm Balchunas, COL (Ret), MSS (Air War College, Air University (Maxwell Air Force Base, AL)) Director of Strategic Solutions. Assistant Research Professor. Applied Informatics Group. Strategic planning, electronic warfare, information operations, cyber-attack, combat operations.
Ellen Bass, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Professor. Characterizing human judgement and decision making, modeling human judgement when supported by information automation, computational models of human-human and human-automation coordination.
Glenn Booker, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Software engineering, systems analysis and design, networking, statistics and measurement, process improvement, object-oriented analysis and design, bioinformatics, and modeling of biological systems.
Toni Carbo, PhD (Drexel University) iSchool Program Leader, Drexel University Center for Graduate Studies, Sacramento. Teaching Professor. Information policy, information ethics, academic librarianship, management and LIS education.
Chris Carroll, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Information technology within healthcare companies, IT infrastructure, networking technology, server technology, information security, virtualization and cloud computing.
Chaomei Chen, PhD (University of Liverpool). Professor. Information visualization, visual analytics, knowledge domain visualization, network analysis and modeling, scientific discovery, science mapping, scientometrics, citation analysis, human-computer interaction.
Catherine D. Collins, MLIS (Indiana University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Knowledge management, collection development, management of information organizations, information sources and services, international development.
Prudence W. Dalrymple, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Director, Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Research and Teaching Professor. User-centered information behaviors, particularly in the health arena, health informatics, evidence based practice, education for the information professions and evaluation, and translation of research into practice.
Susan E. Davis, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Associate Teaching Professor. Archives and special collections management, organization of and access to archival records, archival education, leadership in professions.
M. Carl Drott, PhD (University of Michigan). Associate Professor. Systems analysis techniques, web usage, competitive intelligence.
David E. Fenske, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Dean of the College and Isaac L. Auerbach Professor of Information Science. Digital libraries, informatics, knowledge management and information technologies.
Andrea Forte, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Social computing, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, computer-supported collaborative learning, information literacy.
Susan Gasson, PhD (University of Warwick). Associate Professor. The co-design of business and IT-systems, distributed cognition & knowledge management in boundary-spanning groups, human-centered design, social informatics, online learning communities, grounded theory.
Christopher Geib, PhD (University of Edinburgh). Associate Professor. Probalistic plan recognition and planning, reasoning based on lexicalized grammars, grounding cognition in embodied systems, human-computer interaction, computer network security.
Sean P. Goggins, PhD (University of Missouri). Assistant Professor. Computer-supported cooperative work, computer supported collaborative learning, social computing, collaborative information behavior, distributed work, small group research, software engineering.
Peter Grillo, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Strategic applications of technology within organizations.
Tony H. Grubesic, PhD (The Ohio State University). Associate Professor. Geographic information science, spatial analysis, development, telecommunication policy, location modeling.
Gene Gualtieri, PhD (Michigan State University). Assistant Research Professor. Problems in medical imaging, MRI/PET/CT data, and related technology areas.
Trudi Bellardo Hahn, PhD (Drexel University) Director of Academic Outreach. Teaching Professor. History and origins of the field of information science; scholarly communication, particularly in regard to open access and author rights; development needs of students and faculty in the field.
Gregory W. Hislop, PhD (Drexel University). Professor. Information technology for teaching and learning, online education, structure and organization of the information disciplines, computing education research, software evaluation and characterization.
Xiaohua Tony Hu, PhD (University of Regina, Canada). Professor. Data mining, text mining, Web searching and mining, information retrieval, bioinformatics and healthcare informatics.
Weimao Ke, PhD (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). Assistant Professor. Information retrieval (IR), distributed systems, intelligent filtering/recommendation, information visualization, network science, complex systems, machine learning, text/data mining, multi-agent systems, the notion of information.
Michael Khoo, PhD (University of Colorado at Boulder). Assistant Professor. The understandings and practices that users bring to their interactions with information systems, with a focus on the evaluation of digital libraries and educational technologies.
Alison M. Lewis, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Ethics of librarianship, collection development and services to humanists and social scientists.
Jiexun Jason Li, PhD (University of Arizona). Assistant Professor. Knowledge discovery, data mining, text mining, Web mining, machine learning, network analysis.
Xia Lin, PhD (University of Maryland). Professor. Digital libraries, information visualization, visual interface design, knowledge mapping, human-computer interaction, object-oriented programming, information retrieval, information architecture, information-seeking behaviors in digital environments.
Monica Maceli, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Human-computer interaction, informatics, social computing, meta-design/end-user development, online education, and instructional design.
Linda S. Marion, PhD (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor. Formal and informal communication, bibliometric studies of scholarly communication, diffusion of information, information use in the social sciences, academic and public libraries, information science education.
Katherine W. McCain, PhD (Drexel University). Professor. Scholarly communication, information production and use in the research process, development and structure of scientific specialties, diffusion of innovation, bibliometrics, evaluation of information retrieval systems.
Vanessa J. Irvin Morris, EdD (University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Teaching Professor. Public libraries, social epistemology, youth services, multicultural literature, Web design, social media.
Delia Neuman, PhD (The Ohio State University) Director of the School Library Media Program. Associate Professor. Learning in information-rich environments, instructional systems design, the use of media for learning, and school library media.
Danuta A. Nitecki, PhD (University of Maryland at College Park) Dean of Libraries. Professor. Library metrics and use in management, library as place, and academic library service models.
Jung-ran Park, PhD (University of Hawaii at Manoa). Associate Professor. Knowledge organization and representation (cataloging and classification, metadata, image indexing, thesauri, lexicons, ontologies, semantic web), computer-mediated communication, cross-cultural communication, multilingual information access and discourse.
Lori Richards, MA (University of North Carolina). Assistant Professor. Electronic records management, digital curation, information governance under emerging technologies, cloud computing, economics of public information stewardship.
Harvey Rishikof, JD (New York University School of Law) Director of Cybersecurity and the Law in the iSchool and Earle Mack School of Law. Teaching Professor. National security law, civil and military courts, terrorism, international law, civil liberties, civilian/military relations, governmental process, and the US Constitution.
Jennifer A. Rode, PhD (University of California, Irvine). Assistant Professor. Human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, digital anthropology, gender, security and privacy.
Michelle L. Rogers, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Assistant Professor. Human-computer interaction, healthcare informatics, human factors engineering, socio-technical systems, health services research, patient safety.
Aleksandra Sarcevic, PhD (Rutgers University). Assistant Professor. Computer-supported cooperative work, human-computer interaction, healthcare informatics, crisis informatics, social analysis of information and communications technology (ICT).
Il-Yeol Song, PhD (Louisiana State University). Professor. Conceptual modeling, ontology and patterns, data warehouse and OLAP, object-oriented analysis and design with UML, medical and bioinformatics data modeling & integration, and digital forensics.
Gerry Stahl, PhD (University of Colorado, Northwestern University). Associate Professor. Human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, computer-supported collaborative learning, theory of collaboration.
Julia Stoyanovich, PhD (Columbia University). Assistant Professor. Data and knowledge management, big data, biological data management, search and ranking.
Deborah Turner, PhD (University of Washington). Assistant Professor. Information behavior/interaction, management of information institutions, orality and information.
Kristene Unsworth, PhD (University of Washington). Assistant Professor. Information policy, ethics, government information.
Rosina Weber, PhD (Federal University of Santa Catarina). Associate Professor. Knowledge-based systems; case-based reasoning; textual case-based reasoning; computational intelligence; knowledge discovery; uncertainty, mainly targeting knowledge management goals in different domains, e.g., software engineering, military, finance, and law.
Christopher C. Yang, PhD ( University of Arizona, Tucson). Associate Professor. Web search and mining, security informatics, knowledge management, cross-lingual information retrieval, text summarization, multimedia retrieval, information visualization, information sharing and privacy, digital library, and electronic commerce.
Valerie Ann Yonker, PhD (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor. Human service information systems, systems analysis and design, measurement in software evaluation, knowledge engineering.
Lisl Zach, PhD (University of Maryland). Assistant Professor. Knowledge management/competitive intelligence, disaster-related information services, information-seeking behavior of decision makers, measuring and communicating the value of information, organizational use of information.

Emeritus Faculty

Michael E. Atwood, PhD (University of Colorado) Associate Dean for Research and for Undergraduate Education. Professor. Human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, organizational memory.
Thomas A. Childers, PhD (Rutgers University). Professor Emeritus. Measurement, evaluation, and planning of information and library services, the effectiveness of information organizations.
John B. Hall, PhD (Florida State University). Professor Emeritus. Academic library service, library administration, organization of materials.
Carol Hansen Montgomery, PhD (Drexel University) Dean of Libraries. Professor Emeritus. Selection and use of electronic collections, evaluation of library and information systems, digital libraries, economics of libraries and digital collections.
Howard D. White, PhD (University of California at Berkeley) Visiting Research Professor. Professor Emeritus. Literature information systems, bibliometrics, research methods, collection development, online searching.
Susan Wiedenbeck, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) PhD Program Director. Professor Emeritus. Human-computer interaction, end-user programming/end-user development, empirical studies of programmers, interface design and evaluation.
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