Criminology & Justice Studies

Courses

CJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

This course provides a survey of the criminal justice system with the primary goal of conveying an understanding of America's formal response to crime. We confront the long-standing struggle to balance due process with crime control through the lenses of the police, courts and corrections -- the core elements of the Criminal Justice system. We also examine major crime control paradigms (historic and current), and the tenuous relationship between race and justice. The course offers a variety of educational approaches in an effort to match (as much as is reasonable) students' individual learning styles and needs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 200 Criminology 3.0 Credits

This course examines the myriad factors that explain crime and criminal behavior. The course describes prevalences of different crime types across various populations and geographic areas to help students understand how and why crime often clusters within certain settings. The Course reviews major theories of crime developed over the past two hundred years to help explain crime and the labeling of criminal offenders. The course will draw on references from popular culture to help provide a context for crime and crime causation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 210 Race, Crime, and Justice 3.0 Credits

This course considers how race affects the behaviors of the major institutions of the justice process, as well as how the justice process affects social perceptions of race and crime. The course also describes the relationships among race, criminal offending, and victimization; and it explores how justice-­‐related outcomes are often influenced by the quality and behaviors of local schools, access to housing, economic investment in majority-­‐minority communities, crime control strategies, and the perceived fairness of the justice process itself.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 220 Crime and the City 3.0 Credits

This course reviews the nature of crime and disorder in cities from the urban industrial revolution through the so-called "Crime Drop" of the early 2000s. The course opens with an overview of urbanization, contrasting the “best” with the “worst” aspects of the industrial revolution on human life. It then examines urban drug markets, violence, and policing before moving into a discussion of the crime "peak" of 1992. The course then follows the ensuing crime drop, examining demographic, economic, and cultural factors that may explain the national crime decline. The course then focuses on violence as a public health issue and on how crime, incarceration, health, housing, and education are all tied to urban crime policy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 250 Research Methods & Analytics I 3.0 Credits

This is the first of three integrated methods and analysis courses for CJS students that introduces them to the fundamentals of research design, the benchmarks of scientific quality, sampling, modes of observation, and units of measurement. The course also introduces students to the most relevant analytical procedures often used at each stage in the methodological process, such as developing a data set, performing descriptive (univariate) analyses, examining bivariate relationships, and testing hypotheses using both parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. The course culminates with students writing a research proposal that includes the major components of most grant applications: Statement of the Problem, Literature Review, Research Questions, and Research Methodology/Analytical Procedures.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 260 Justice in Our Community 4.0 Credits

This course is a seminar style community-­‐based learning course that will begin with an introduction to justice in urban communities and examine problems unique to cities. The will include class lectures and on-site work with our community partners at UConnect. The synthesis of scholarship and community classroom experience will provide a holistic lens in which to explore issues in our urban community. Topics include urban economies, access to education and health care, digital divides and crime. Students who take this course will also register for one recitation section of CJS 260.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 261 Prison, Society and You 3.0 Credits

This course utilizes the Inside-­‐Out Prison Exchange Program to explore the relationship between individuals and the prison system. The Inside-­‐Out Exchange Program is an evolving set of projects that creates opportunities for dialogue between those on the outside and those on the inside of the nation’s correctional facilities. The program demonstrates the potential for dynamic collaborations between institutions of higher education and correctional institutions. Most importantly, through this unique exchange, Inside-Out, this course seeks to deepen the conversation and transform ways of thinking about crime and justice (Crabbe, Pompa, 2004).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 265 Criminal Investigation 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the broad field of criminal investigations. It examines the elements of an effective investigation, the equipment, technology and procedures used to complete successful investigations. It also covers note taking, crime scene photography and sketching, searching the crime scene, identifying and collecting physical evidence, and arresting and searching suspects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 266 Crime Prevention Planning 3.0 Credits

The course will explore the role of places and environments on criminal opportunities. By analyzing residential and business layouts, street networks, and routine activities of individuals, the course will seek ways in which situational crime prevention methods may then be applied for preventing criminal behavior in both the public and private settings.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 267 Introduction to Security Studies 3.0 Credits

This course examines the private security industry. Substantive topics of interest include the historical development of the industry; its linkage to public forms of security (law enforcement and the regulatory state); its legal underpinnings; management issues; and the nature of internal and external threats faced by facilities and organizations. The philosophical and analytic paradigm for security -- risk analysis and prevention -- offers a framework for the study of problem solving models used in the field. This framework, along with the analytic models utilized by security professionals will be explored in depth.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 273 Surveillance, Technology, and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine current surveillance technologies used by criminal justice agencies and private sector organizations and the laws that regulate government surveillance and protect privacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 274 Sex, Violence, & Crime on the Internet 3.0 Credits

This course explores how offenders are adopting computers to commit traditional crimes in a high-tech manner. Specific attention will be paid to the following types of crime: cyberstalking, online harassment, cyberbullying, sexting, and computer-facilitated sexual exploitation of children. Related legislation and current law enforcement practices to address these crimes will be examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 275 Issues in Domestic Violence 3.0 Credits

Domestic Violence is a familiar phrase, but what does it really mean? How often does it occur? Is it a new phenomenon? Do other countries view domestic abuse as a problem? In our class we will examine these questions using broad conceptual frameworks. It will then explore the definitional aspects of domestic violence, common characteristics of victims and offenders, as well as the historic, current, and emerging criminal justice responses to domestic violence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 276 Introduction to Computer Crime 3.0 Credits

This course provides an overview of computer crime. Emphasis will be placed on the legislative responses and policy issues related to computer intrusions and cyberfraud. Issues encountered when informing laws in cyberspace and the public/private sector initiatives for dealing with computer crime will also be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 277 Introduction to Correctional Practices 3.0 Credits

This course provides insight into the Correctional component of the Criminal Justice System. Students will learn and understand correctional theory, over view of correctional facilities management and practice and contemporary issues in the field of corrections, including re-entry and alternatives to incarceration. Emphasis will be placed on actual real world experiences based upon the Philadelphia Prison System. Course material will be presented through the required textbook, court opinions from legal cases, handouts, classroom lecture and discussion, on-site visits and tours of the various Philadelphia Prison System facilities and guest lectures and demonstrations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 278 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3.0 Credits

This course examines the implications of maintaining an armed police force in a democratic society whose mandate requires it to enforce laws under the tacit threat of coercion. The course explores different styles of policing that are commonly found in urban, rural, and suburban locations; and it examines the rise and consequences of historic crime control paradigms, such as the War on Drugs, and the War on Terrorism. It offers an overview of Supreme Court decisions that have most affected police functions and authority. And it will highlight the police use of technology for the purposes of coercion, surveillance, and communication.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 280 Communities and Crime 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the ecological study of crime. Crime varies in time, space, and populations as it reflects neighborhood structures and the routine social interactions that occur in daily life. Concentrations of crime can be found among locations, with antisocial activities like assaults and theft occurring at higher rates because of the demographic make-up of people (e.g., adolescents) or conflicts (e.g., competing gangs), for reasons examined by ecological criminology. We examine variations in socio-demographic structures (age, education ratios, and the concentration of poverty) and the physical environment (housing segregation, density of bars, street lighting) predicts variations between neighborhoods in the level of crime and disorder.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 289 Terrorism 3.0 Credits

This course examines the varying types and purposes of terrorism and its application. It will discuss the problems with definitions, worldviews and ideologies, and how these affect both the perceptions and responses to terrorist events.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 290 Crime and Public Policy 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on criminal justice and non-criminal justice policies used to combat crime. Students will use the most recent crime data and explanatory theories on crime to evaluate current policy. A multi-disciplinary approach will be used to develop new policies designed to have a long-lasting impact on crime.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 295 International Field Experience 1.0-3.0 Credit

This course provides students the opportunity to process and contextualize their recent Intensive Course Abroad (taken through Drexel's Study Abroad Office). By keeping an extensive travel journal, participating in all activities while abroad, and through a series of written reflection assignments, students will link their travel experiences with assigned academic materials to help them make meaning from their observations while on tour in the relevant host countries.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS 300 Research Methods and Analytics II 3.0 Credits

This course builds on (and reviews) the fundamentals of research design introduced in Methods and Analysis I with the specific aim of teaching students how to construct, and analyze data generated from, surveys. Students will learn the “mechanics” of survey design, such as where to place demographic questions, as well as how to identify and include validated scales on the instrument, and how to avoid misleading or debilitative items (e.g., “double-barreled” questions, biased/leading questions, non-mutually exclusive or exhaustive response categories. Students will also learn the process (and importance) of pre-testing the survey prior to implementing it; and they will be trained to analyze survey results using SPSS and other software packages as needed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 250 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 301 Methods and Analytics III 3.0 Credits

The course focuses on the development of a community needs assessment as a platform for giving students the opportunity to work as part of a research team in the field, creating a data collection instrument, collecting and analyzing data, and reporting the findings. The course integrates the community needs assessment methodology with the urban disorder literature to educate students in the modes of observation required to reliably measure crime, disorder, surveillance gaps, and other sources of community risk. Students will map community demographic features, develop an assessment tool, make field observations, and analyze the findings as part of their culminating experience.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 300 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 302 Advanced Criminological Theorizing 3.0 Credits

This course offers a detailed examination of several major theories of crime. Whereas CJ204-Criminology represents a survey of many criminological theories, this advanced course focuses on three major perspectives in criminology: Life-course, genetics/bio-social, social disorganization (and specifically, subculture of violence) theories. The course also helps students understand how different criminological theories might integrate with each other to offer broad perspectives the causes of crime.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 204 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 204 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 320 Comparative Justice Systems 3.0 Credits

This course offers students a transnational perspective on crime and justice institutions. As the world increasingly globalizes, it becomes increasingly important to understand how countries outside the United States undertake the processes of detecting crime, labeling people “criminal,” and adjudicating criminal offenders. Is there a common threshold in other countries for determining guilt? Is there a universal standard that governs the presumption or guilt or innocence at the onset of the criminal justice process? How many other countries still use the death penalty? These are questions the course will address in addition to others related to policing, courts, and corrections.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 101 [Min Grade: C] or CJ 206 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 330 Crime Mapping Using Geographic Information Systems 3.0 Credits

This is primarily a lab course that trains students in the fundamentals of crime mapping using geospatial software. The course opens with a history of crime mapping, then moves to an examination of several place-based theories of criminology that help explain why crime events often cluster in time and space. The course then uses scenario-based exercises to train students how to work with and manage geospatial data, conduct select spatial analyses, interpret the results of such analyses within the contexts of different criminological theories, and create maps that illustrate spatial patterns and relationships across different units of geography.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 335 Intelligence-Led Decision-Making 3.0 Credits

This course examines the processes of (1) identifying crime and security threats across different risk terrains, turning raw information from non-crime sources into intelligence data that can help forecast crime/security problems, and (2) developing a strategic plan to guide the deployment of crime control resources for solving a crime problem or reducing a security threat. The course also introduces students to the importance of developing multi-organizational collaborations that create data streams from key social agencies (e.g., schools, hospitals, local commercial enterprises, tourism offices, etc.) that could help predict crime problems or threats to public safety before they become apparent. Students will develop a Strategic Plan designed to reduce a crime problem or security threat in a local setting.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 330 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 360 Juvenile Justice 3.0 Credits

Students will learn about the history, development and current status of the juvenile justice system. Philosophical, sociological, psychological, legal and political factors contributing to the changes in the manner in which society processes children and youth who violate social norms will be explored in research articles, legal decision, and theoretical analyses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 362 Gender, Crime, and Justice 3.0 Credits

This term will explore the historical roots of crime and how we study crime specifically; we will critically analyze female crime trends and statistics, gender and the law, and female offending. After laying a strong foundation, we will connect gender and crime by exploring rape, pornography, and domestic violence, sex trafficking and female gangs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 364 Community Corrections 3.0 Credits

This course is a comprehensive, up-to-date, coverage of evidence-based practices and research for probation, release from prisons and other community-based alternatives in their historical, philosophical, social and legal contexts illustrated with real life examples.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 365 Computer Investigations and the Law 3.0 Credits

This course will examine the techniques used to investigate Internet crimes and extract evidence from digital storage devices. Specific attention will be paid to the procedural laws that govern digital forensic techniques and investigations involving electronic evidence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 366 Technology and the Justice System 3.0 Credits

This course will examine past and current technologies adopted in the field of criminal justice to assess their usefulness in identifying and preventing crime and advancing justice. We will also discuss technologies on the horizon that are likely to be adopted by criminal justice agencies. Additionally, methods for evaluating technology use will be examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 369 Forensic Science Survey Course 3.0 Credits

This survey course introduces some principles and techniques of forensic science as they pertain to crime scene investigation and crime laboratory analysis. The course is designed to be accessible to those without a science background, but at the same time will provide a well-rounded introduction to some topics for those considering further studies in the field.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 372 Death Penalty - An American Dilemma 3.0 Credits

Capital punishment is one of the most complex issues in Criminal Justice and one of the most controversial facing America. Everyone has an opinion about the death penalty but rarely is it grounded in hard evidence. This course will examine the history of the use of capital punishment in America by reviewing the relevant case law in this area and will explore in-depth the issues which rise from the use of the Death Penalty in this country. Is it ethical? Is it fairly administered? Is it effective? Should it be reformed? Can it be reformed?.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 373 Environmental Crime 3.0 Credits

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to and overview of the federal criminal enforcement program concerning the criminal prosecution of certain types of violations of federal environmental laws and regulations. Although the focus of the course will be on the federal government’s environmental crimes program that is administered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, general concepts concerning criminal law and procedure will also be discussed. More specifically, topics to be covered will include, among other things: the history of the federal environmental crimes program; the role of EPA-CID Special Agents and federal prosecutors in the investigation and prosecution of environmental crimes; environmental offenses under the federal Federal Acts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 374 Restorative Justice 3.0 Credits

Restorative justice is a paradigm shift in criminal justice in response to the failure of the traditional retributive model to meet the needs of victims, offenders and the community. This course offers an overview of Restorative Justice, including its definitions, history, theoretical and legal basis, principles and practices, controversial issues, and evaluative research as to its efficacy and reducing crime and restoring victims and communities.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 375 Criminal Procedure 3.0 Credits

A solid understanding of constitutional criminal procedure is essential to any career in the law or law enforcement. Further, as America seeks to protect itself from terrorism, every citizen should understand the constitutional protections that Americans have historically enjoyed which have been and continue to be diminished by the courts and the legislature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 376 Sentencing 3.0 Credits

We explore the theoretical basis for sentencing, including the purposes of sentencing, and determination of the just sentence, including the consideration of the crime, as well as the offender’s background and criminal history. We cover contemporary issues like prosecutorial misconduct, plea bargaining, sentencing guidelines, mandatory minimums, truth in sentencing and the impact of racial and gender disparities. We also spend time investigating special issues within the field such as the sentencing of juveniles and capital sentencing procedures.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 377 Intellectual Property Theft in the Digital Age 3.0 Credits

This seminar focuses on the changing nature of intellectual property theft, piracy, and copyright infringement in the Digital Age. Attention will be paid to legislative and technical solutions for protecting copyrighted goods (including music, movies, and software) and the challenges faced when investigating the theft of intellectual property. Additionally, theoretical explanations to account for intellectual property theft will be explored.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 378 Science of Forensic Science 3.0 Credits

Forensics is the application of science or other disciplines to the Legal System. Students will study the science of science in application of ethics and scientific method to evidence analysis and presentation of data to Court. Students will learn to recognize and deal with context, observer, expectancy, and experimenter effects. Data from actual cases will be discussed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 379 Forensic DNA Analysis 3.0 Credits

An introduction to DNA analysis methods in current forensic testing. Genetics, inheritance, DNA biochemistry are applied to a fluorescent detection technology to produce results using one or more manufactured DNA testing kits. Students will be exposed to actual casework data and as virtual analyst present results to juries and judges.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CJS 400 Capstone in Criminology and Justice Policy 3.0 Credits

The capstone course will be open only to Criminology and Justice Policy Seniors. This course serves as an opportunity for students to apply their cumulative knowledge in the Criminology and Justice Policy concentration to an identified crime, policy, and/or criminal justice deployment problem facing the field today. This may be a more global problem, such as mass incarceration across the United States, or a highly localized problem, such drug markets in an urban setting. Students will work in consultation with the professor and their class peers to identify a problem, and then develop an evidence-based solution to address the problem. The course culminates with students presenting their evidence-based solutions to the class at the end of the quarter.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CJS and classification is Senior.

CJS 401 Program Evaluation 3.0 Credits

This course will examine research designs and statistical methods often used when evaluating criminal justice programs or policies. The course will focus mostly on the conceptual, rather than the applied, giving students an opportunity to begin to synthesize the methods and techniques to which they were exposed in the previous methods and analytics courses. During the course, students will develop a proposal to conduct an evaluation of a policy and/or program, using a research design that meets the benchmarks of scientificquality; and they will incorporate several research and analytics strategies they learned in previous courses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CJS 250 [Min Grade: C] and CJS 300 [Min Grade: C] and CJS 330 [Min Grade: C]

CJS 402 Capstone in Justice Informatics 3.0 Credits

The Capstone in Justice Informatics course calls upon students to integrate the concepts covered in the informatics, computing, analytical, and methodological courses in their major to develop a informatics-driven plan that addresses a problem pertaining to crime, criminality, or criminal justice. The course will culminate with students making a professional presentation of their plan/project to the class.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CJ and classification is Senior.

CJS I199 Independent Study in CJS 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS I299 Independent Study in CJS 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS I399 Independent Study in CJS 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides a course of independent study in Criminology and Justice Studies. Topics for study must be approved in advance of registration by the advisor and the instructor involved.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS I499 Independent Study in CJS 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS T180 Special Topics in Criminology & Justice Studies 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS T280 Special Topics in Criminology & Justice Studies 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS T380 Special Topics in Criminology and Justice Studies 12.0 Credits

This course will explore current issues and interests in Criminology and Justice Studies. The topic will vary each term.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CJS T480 Special Topics in Criminology & Justice Studies 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

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