Environmental Science

Courses

ENVS 101 Introduction to Environmental Science 5.0 Credits

Students will be introduced to a variety of disciplines and techniques necessary to effectively study local stream, marsh, lake, and terrestrial ecosystems. Students will examine the physical, chemical, and biological elements with these ecosystems with an emphasis on biological elements. Some of the field experiences will include learning how to sample algae, higher plants, invertebrates, fish and salamanders, and methods for surveying and monitoring marshes and selected physical and chemical measurements.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.

ENVS 102 Natural History, Research and Collections 2.0 Credits

Students will learn about the scope, nature and uses of the specimen collection, methods of collection care, maintenance and growth for different taxonomic groups. Students will learn how biodiversity research questions and projects are conceived and implemented. Students will observe and collect specimens and data, and begin to learn analyses and publication of results. Students will gain an appreciation for the role of natural history collections in modern research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.

ENVS 169 Environmental Science 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to environmental problems and their causes, cultural changes, worldviews, ethics and environment. It covers such topics as science, matter and energy, ecosystems and how they work, air and air pollution, climate, global warming, and ozone loss, waste minerals and soil, solid, toxic and hazardous wastes, protecting food sources and energy resources.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 201 Practical Identification of Plants and Animals 2.0 Credits

This course provides instruction and hands on experience in using print and online taxonomic keys, field guides and reference collections of real specimens for identification of plants, animals and fungi. The emphasis is on the flora and fauna of the Philadelphia region and learning how to use identification tools in the field and lab. The main objective is to have students understand the importance of accurate identification of organisms and to develop basic knowledge and skills that can be extended and applied to organisms widely.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 202 Tree of Life 2.0 Credits

This course reviews the diversity of life in the context of phylogenetic history as the organizing principle. The course emphasizes recent discoveries of living and fossil taxa, breakthroughs and controversies in resolving relationships, and the key evolutionary innovations in eukaryotes, such as multicellularity, major shifts in habitat, parasitism, symbiosis, and complex morphological novelties.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 203 The Watershed Approach 2.0 Credits

Students will integrate several disciplines of study to compare an urbanized to a non-urbanized stream ecosystem. All elements of the stream ecosystem and its watershed will be examined. Field experience will include learning how to assess the physical properties of a stream, measure and monitor water quality, sample invertebrates and vertebrates.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: ENVS 101 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 212 Evolution 4.0 Credits

Aspects of the fact of evolution are discussed in class, including early evolutionary thought, pivotal moments in the history of life, and evidences for evolution from fossils, genetics, and living organisms. Key concepts include natural selection, speciation, adaptation, vicariance, inclusive fitness, and evodevo. Non-scientific arguments pertaining to evolution are refuted.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 226 Discoveries in Animal Behavior 3.0 Credits

The course explores the incredible diversity of animal behavior using specially selected examples of recent research findings. It focuses on the adaptiveness of behavior: how animals solve problems posed by their physical and social environments. We will consider implications of research on other species for understanding our own (human) behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if major is BIO or major is ENVS

ENVS 230 General Ecology 3.0 Credits

This course examines how organisms interact with the biological and physical world and bridges the natural sciences with the social sciences. Using evolutionary theory as its basis, this course will cover topics spanning multiple levels of organization within the science of ecology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 101 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 106 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 109 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 123 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 141 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 254 Invertebrate Morphology and Physiology 3.0 Credits

Provides comparative study of the major invertebrate groups, relationships between physiology and organismal structure, phylogenetic relationships and classification, development, and life histories.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 100 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 101 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 107 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 109 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 124 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: ENVS 255

ENVS 255 Invertebrate Morphology and Physiology Lab 2.0 Credits

This laboratory course provides a comparative study of the morphology of representative species from the major invertebrate groups. How their structural features relate to their physiology and behavior is emphasized. Identification of species, examining phylogenetic relationships, and understanding life histories will relate organisms to their ecological roles.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Corequisite: ENVS 254

ENVS 260 Environmental Science and Society 3.0 Credits

This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to the range of disciplines that make up the environmental sciences. The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of basic physical, ecological and social sciences that focus on the study on the natural environment and its interaction with human society.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

ENVS 275 Global Climate Change 3.0 Credits

This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to the issue of global climate change. It focuses on the scientific evidence for climate change, its impact on natural and human systems, actions that can be taken to mitigate or adapt to climate change and the political and cultural dynamics of this issue.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 280 Special Topics 12.0 Credits

Special topics offered in biodiversity, earth and environmental science. Topics include recent multidisciplinary areas of environmental concern.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ENVS 284 [WI] Physiological and Population Ecology 3.0 Credits

Examines the role of physiological adaptation in the ecology of plants and animals and the principles of population biology as applied to biological systems. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 123 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 141 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 109 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 285 [WI] Population Ecology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

This laboratory course will introduce the basic concepts of populations ecology in context of their modern ramifications and will prepare students for advanced research in population ecology. Some or all pre-requisites may be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Please see the department for more information.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 284 [Min Grade: D], ENVS 284 [Min Grade: D] (Can be taken Concurrently)

ENVS 286 Community and Ecosystem Ecology 3.0 Credits

Introduces the principles of community and ecosystem ecology. Emphasizes the role of community structure and ecosystem organization in the ecology of plants and animals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 123 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 141 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 109 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 287 Community Ecology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

This laboratory course will introduce the basic concepts of community ecology in context of their modern ramifications and will prepare students for advanced research in community and ecosystem ecology. Some or all pre-requisites may be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Please see the department for more information.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 286 [Min Grade: D], ENVS 286 [Min Grade: D] (Can be taken Concurrently)

ENVS 289 Global Warming, Biodiversity and Your Future 3.0 Credits

Human induced global warming is changing the physical environment, ecological systems, and human systems around the world. We will explore causes, effects, and consequences of global warming using NASA satellite information and current scientific and semi-popular writings. Students will understand the implications of global climate change for their futures.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

ENVS 302 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory 2.0 Credits

In this curse students will learn basic techniques for chemical analysis of environmental samples, including biological material, water and soil. Students will also learn to utilize more manual methods but will also use electronic data acquisition systems and further develop their scientific writing skills.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: CHEM 103 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 308 GIS and Environmental Modeling 4.0 Credits

Students will learn how to write computer programs to read data directly from digital maps and then perform various spatial analyses and modeling tasks. The class will include an introduction to spatial- and geo-statistics; techniques for determining ecological riches of organisms, methods for modeling basic forcing factors such as solar radiation, water temperature; approaches for modeling the flow of water in a landscape; and ultimately, combining these techniques to model or simulate ecosystems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: MATH 102 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 123 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 310 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry 3.0 Credits

This course uses a topic-based approach to the chemistry of the environment. Students in this course are expected to have a minimal/some knowledge of chemistry, with a desire of applying this knowledge to the environment. Topics of interest include environmental chemistry of water, water pollution, water treatment, geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, hazardous materials and resources.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 103 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 312 Systematic Bio: Principles & Methods 3.0 Credits

This is an introduction to systematic biology. The primary tasks of systematics are 1) the discovery, description, and classification of biodiversity to construct a general reference system for life on Earth; 2) the reconstruction of the "tree of life": the descent relationships among units of biodiversity at multiple hierarchic levels from genes to phyla; and 3) the application of reconstructions of decent relationships to the study of evolution. Phylogenetic systematics, concerned with units of biodiversity at the species level and above, will be emphasized.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is BIO or major is ENVS.
Prerequisites: ENVS 201 [Min Grade: C] or ENVS 202 [Min Grade: C] or BIO 217 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 321 Environmental Health 3.0 Credits

Covers evaluation of environmental hazards and design of environmental controls for the health and well-being of humans. Accompanying seminar on current problems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 123 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 141 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 322 Tropical Ecology 3.0 Credits

This is a course in the ecology of tropical rain forests and dry forests. Tropical ecology will explore the physical and biological factors that result in the formation of the forest, the effect of human impact, the effectiveness of management, and the future of these forests.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 323 Tropical Field Studies 3.0 Credits

Ecology of tropical rain forests and dry forests. We will explore physical and biological factors that result in formation of these forests, effect of human impacts on these forests, effectiveness of management of these forests, and the future of these forests in Costa Rica in the field. Some or all pre-requisites may be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Please see the department for more information.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 322 [Min Grade: D] (Can be taken Concurrently)

ENVS 324 Microbial Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies the relationships of microbes with plants, animals, and the environment, both biotic and abiotic components. Examines the key role of microbes in the functioning of ecosystems affecting decomposition, disease, nutrient cycling, and energy flow. Studies these processes and the role of microbes in the natural functions of ecosystems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 221 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 316 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 316 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 326 Molecular Ecology 3.0 Credits

Through a combination of lecture, discussion, and computational exercises, students will learn how molecular tools have been used to study genetic variation. They will then learn how these studies have provided answers to previously unanswered questions in fields including ecology, evolution, behavior, conservation, and forensics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 284 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 284 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 218 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 230 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 327 Molecular Ecology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

Through a combination of laboratory and computational exercises, students will develop a toolkit for applied molecular studies of ecology and evolution. The course will focus on initiating or continuing a novel research project relating to one of several topics within the field of molecular ecology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 284 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 284 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 218 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 328 Conservation Biology 3.0 Credits

This course we will detail the loss of biodiversity and explore related issues, including the theories and practices of conservation biology and the solutions currently and the solutions currently being formulated to enhance the preservation of species on our planet. The course will explore potential limitations to these strategies and provide an appreciation of the relevance of ethics, economics and politics to biodiversity conservation while promoting the potential for individual action to influence conservation efforts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 330 Aquatic Ecology 3.0 Credits

Studies the relationships between aquatic plants and animals and their environment. Introduces the study of the ecology of lakes, rivers, ponds, and streams.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

ENVS 333 Wetland Ecology 3.0 Credits

Examination of the structure, function, and dynamics of wetland ecosystems. Topics include geomorphology, hydrology, biogeochemistry, plant and animal adaptations to wetland environments, and wetland policy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 203 [Min Grade: D] and ENVS 308 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 334 Watershed Ecology 3.0 Credits

Watershed ecology explores the linkages among aquatic ecosystems and their water catchment or watershed. Aquatic ecosystems are influenced by physical, chemical, and biologic factors in "the watershed." The conditions in the watershed influence aquatic ecosystems at several spatial-scales, for example areas neighboring a stream, "the riparian zone," influences water temperature much more than those areas further away from the stream. Incorporating spatial scale into watershed studies is a developing field with many opportunities to advance watershed science and the associated environmental regulations and policies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 126 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 336 Terrestrial Ecology 5.0 Credits

Studies the relationships between terrestrial plants and animals and their environment. Introduces the study of the ecology of local ecosystems, such as the Poconos and the New Jersey Pine Barrens.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 126 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 230 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 341 Equatorial Guinea: Society & Environment 4.5 Credits

A lecture and community outreach course based at the National University of Equatorial Guinea that combines instruction in mankind's relationship with the natural environment (human population, natural resources, environmental degradation, pollution, biodiversity loss and climate change) with environmental outreach activities specific to Equatorial Guinea.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 342 Equatorial Guinea: Natural Resource Economics 4.5 Credits

A lecture course based a the National University of Equatorial Guinea that combines instruction in the economic implications of natural resources (renewable and non-renewable resources, efficient utilization, market performance, government controls, sustainability and discounting) with a university-wide guest lecture series addressing local issues.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 343 Equatorial Guinea: Field Methods 3.0 Credits

A lecture and field excursion course based at the University of Equatorial Guinea combining instruction in standard methods for studying rainforest communities (expedition planning; GPS and mapping, forest diversity and productivity; wildlife population monitoring) with multi-day field experiences in Bioko Island's remote protected areas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENVS 344 Equatorial Guinea: Field Research 6.0 Credits

An intensive research course that takes advantage of the unspoiled rainforest adjacent to the Moka Wildlife Center, a university-affiliated research station located in the highlands of Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (Central/West Africa). Opportunities exist for student research on topics including primates, antelope, birds, chameleons, butterflies and plants.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits

ENVS 351 Resource and Environmental Economics 4.0 Credits

Examines the microeconomic and quantitative aspects of markets for both renewable and exhaustible resources, and the interaction between the energy and resource sectors of the economy and between the productive sectors of the economy and the natural environment, with evaluation of major public initiatives and issues in these areas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ECON 201 [Min Grade: D] and ECON 202 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 360 Evolutionary Developmental Biology 3.0 Credits

Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Evo-Devo) compares developmental processes between organisms to determine how these mechanisms evolved in light of ancestral relationships. Topics include “your inner fish,” how to “build” a dinosaur, and the reducibly simple evolution of the eye. Also explored are developmental controls such as environmental factors and molecular mechanisms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 217 [Min Grade: D] and BIO 218 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 364 Animal Behavior 3.0 Credits

The mechanisms, ecology and evolution of the activities of animals in relation to their natural environment. Topics include development and control (neural and hormonal) of behavior, adaptations for survival, feeding, and predator avoidance, strategies of habitat selection, communication, reproduction, and social behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 123 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 126 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 365 Animal Behavior Laboratory 2.0 Credits

An observational study of the behavior of a captive group of social animals at the Philadelphia Zoo including species selection, background research, ethogram construction, 16 hours of quantified observation, analysis of data and written report.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVS 364 [Min Grade: D] (Can be taken Concurrently)

ENVS 370 Practice of Environmental Economics 3.0 Credits

The focus of this course is on the real world implications of environmental resources exploitation and economic tools for dealing with them. Areas include air and water pollution, toxic wastes and mineral, water and forestry resource harvesting/extraction.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ECON 201 [Min Grade: D] and ECON 202 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 382 Field Botany of the New Jersey Pine Barrens 4.0 Credits

This course focuses on plant identification skills that are necessary to conduct scientific botanical surveys. The vascular flora of the New Jersey Pine Barrens, including rare plant species, is emphasized with special reference to habitat and community analysis. Non-vascular species are examined but not emphasized.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.

ENVS 383 Ecology of the New Jersey Pine Barrens 4.0 Credits

Course focuses on the ecology of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Students learn field methods, identify index species (flora and fauna), perform community analyses, and use equipment for measuring abiotic variables (soil and water). Field exercises focus on key aspects of the regional ecology: fire, soil and water.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.

ENVS 385 Systems Ecology 3.0 Credits

Systems Ecology will provide the tools to integrate and synthesize disciplines of sciences to understand the development, disruption, and dynamics of ecosystems. Students will learn general systems theory about how elements of an ecosystem interact with other parts of the system and how exogenous or external variables drive ecosystem processes. The course will show how to combine field data with simple mathematics in step by step calculations to describe, study, and emulate complex systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 203 [Min Grade: D] and ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 388 Marine Field Methods 4.0 Credits

Course focus is on the ecology of local marine environments. Students learn marine field survey methods, identification of marine organisms, habitat analyses, and use of equipment for measuring abiotic variables. Students sample fish, plankton and invertebrate species aboard the Drexel 25 foot Research Vessel Peter Kilham.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.

ENVS 390 Marine Ecology 3.0 Credits

This course studies major processes in the marine environment, especially relationships between organisms and the factors that influence their abundance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

ENVS 391 Diversity, Evolution and Ecology of Algae 3.0 Credits

Origin and evolution of various algal groups, principles and methods of algal systematics, algal ecology, and use of algae as environmental indicators. Field trips to local streams, ponds and wetlands where students will collect algal samples and record environmental data. Lab work will include sample processing and algal identification.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 102 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 392 Ichthyology and Herpetology 3.0 Credits

Many species of fishes, amphibians and reptiles face extirpation from their former ranges and some face total extinction within our lifetime. This course investigates major regional and global issues concerning viability of these organisms and addresses solutions using concepts of population ecology, community ecology, physiological ecology and conservation biology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

ENVS 393 Entomology 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to some of the major topics in the field of entomology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: ENVS 394

ENVS 394 Entomology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

This course introduces students to some of the major practical topics in the field of entomology. The course consists of lab work, collecting trips, and creation of an insect collection.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: ENVS 393

ENVS 400 Cascade Mentoring 2.0 Credits

Provides senior ENVS students with mentoring and service opportunities within the Environmental Science curriculum. The course will also cover issues of ethics, professional development and career counseling. ENVS senior students will be required to enroll as a peer mentor for one of these six courses. Seniors will work with faculty to help plan and deliver experiential activities and will act as mentors and tutors for first and second year students enrolled in these courses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENVS and classification is Senior.

ENVS 401 Chemistry of the Environment 3.0 Credits

Covers principles of physical and organic chemistry applicable to the study and evaluation of environmental conditions, especially the pollution of air, water, and soil (including chemical changes and reactions in the environment).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVE 302 [Min Grade: D] or CHEM 103 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 405 Atmospheric Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Introduces the principles of atmospheric physics and photochemical kinetics as a prelude to understanding the atmospheric chemical system. Examines the chemistry of the natural atmosphere to prepare for the understanding of how pollutants interact with natural species. Considers pollution of the stratosphere and the troposphere.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 401 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 401 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 410 Physiological Ecology 3.0 Credits

Examines mechanisms by which physiological factors affect and limit the distribution and abundance of animals, including physiological and behavioral thermoregulation, heat and cold tolerance, acclimation, metabolism, osmoregulation and dehydration tolerance, feeding strategies, digestion and feeding patterns, energy and water budges, toxins and optimality theory.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (ENVR 230 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 230 [Min Grade: D]) and (ENVR 284 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 284 [Min Grade: D] or BIO 201 [Min Grade: D])

ENVS 412 Biophysical Ecology 3.0 Credits

Covers energy balances and methods of heat transfer in organisms, including convection, conduction, radiation, evaporation, and metabolism and steady-state and transient energy balances, including mass balances, water uptake and evaporation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (MATH 239 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 123 [Min Grade: D]) and PHYS 153 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 413 Advanced Population Ecology 3.0 Credits

One on of the greatest issues concerning life on Earth and human impact on the planet is whether species will survive or go extinct. This course explores how wild populations change over time and investigates the concepts and quantitative methods used to determine the viability of plant and animal populations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 284 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 284 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 414 Advanced Community Ecology 3.0 Credits

Community ecology is the study of how populations of organisms interact with each other and the physical environment. Students will investigate the underlying principles that explain and predict interactions among populations of organisms, and how these principles can be used to conserve and manage wild animal and plant communities.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 286 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 286 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 436 Principles of Toxicology I 3.0 Credits

This course reviews general human physiology and the acute and chronic effects of toxicants upon physiological mechanism. Basic principles of dose-response relationships, target organ toxicity and exposure characterization are incorporated.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: BIO 201 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 437 Principles of Toxicology II 3.0 Credits

This course expands upon knowledge gained in ENVS 436 Principles of Toxicology I by focusing on the absorption, distribution, biotransformation, and excretion of toxic substances. Current advances in the studies of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis are also discussed as well as toxicological research methods, animal and plant toxins, food toxicology and pesticides.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENVR 436 [Min Grade: D] or ENVS 436 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 438 Biodiversity 3.0 Credits

This course explores major patterns of biodiversity that biologists have documented across the planet. The course begins with an overview of major types of biodiversity, focusing on species diversity, and methods for measuring and analyzing biodiversity. Next it explores major patterns of biodiversity that are fundamental to ecology and conservation, and theories for the causes of biodiversity patterns.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 124 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 441 [WI] Issues in Global Change I: Seminar 2.0 Credits

Discusses and evaluates topics such as records of climate change, atmospheric chemistry and global warming, the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, acid rain, decreased biodiversity, desertification, deforestation, and sea-level rise. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.

ENVS 442 Issues in Global Change II: Research 2.0 Credits

Requires students to focus on a particular change topic or issue in order to analyze it, prepare a research report, and present a final seminar.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: ENVS 441 [Min Grade: D] or ENVR 441 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 443 Issues in Global Change III: Synthesis 2.0 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide seniors in Environmental Science and Ecology with an opportunity to make an in-depth examination of the factors causing global change in the 21st century, to analyze their own data as well as that in the literature, to synthesize new ideas and to report orally and in writing on their findings.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENVS 442 [Min Grade: D]

ENVS 470 Advanced Topics in Evolution 3.0 Credits

Discusses and evaluates selected topics such as population and quantitative genetics, genomics in evolutionary analysis, fitness concepts and modes of selection, species concepts and modes of speciation, evolution of development and complex adaptations, biological diversification over space and time, adaptive radiation and extinction, historical biogeography. Topics for each term will be selected based on current research and interest.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits
Prerequisites: BIO 217 [Min Grade: C]

ENVS 480 Special Topics 12.0 Credits

Special topics offered in environmental science. Topics include recent multidisciplinary areas of environmental concern.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

ENVS 497 Research 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides guided research in ecology, earth science and environmental science.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

ENVS 498 Independent Study 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides independent study in environmental science.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

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