Biological Sciences

Master of Science: 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 (post-bachelor's) or 45.0 (post-master's) quarter credits

About the Program

The Department of Biology offers graduate programs in biological sciences leading to the doctorate degree and to the thesis or non-thesis master of science degree. The curricula and research programs are designed to help students achieve success in their degree programs and pursue positions of leadership in their respective fields of research.

The intellectual life of the department relies heavily on the participation, creativity and the energy of graduate students, therefore the department expects students to be vigorously involved in courses, seminars, journal clubs, research, informal discussions, and departmental function. 

MS in Biological Sciences

Degree Requirements

Soon after matriculation the student completes a plan of study with the advisor, outlining his or her specific program. Both thesis and non-thesis options are available. Conducting formal research necessary for the thesis is dependent upon the student finding a faculty member whom will serve as their faculty advisor and supervise a mutually agreed upon research project.

Students wishing to pursue PhD candidacy are encouraged to elect the MS with thesis. After all other requirements are completed, the research MS student defends the thesis at a final oral examination. The non-thesis student takes a comprehensive examination.


Requirements for the MS Curriculum with Thesis
BIO 500Biochemistry I3.0
BIO 532Advanced Cell Biology3.0
BIO 540Readings in Molecular and Cellular Bioscience and Biotechnology3.0
BIO 601Research Methods3.0
BIO 635Advanced Genetics and Molecular Biology3.0
BIO 679Issues in Scientific Research3.0
BIO 997Research in Bioscience9.0
ENVS 506Biostatistics3.0
Five Bioscience (BIO) or Environmental Science (ENVS) electives 15.0
Total Credits45.0

Requirements for the Non-thesis MS Curriculum
BIO 500Biochemistry I3.0
BIO 532Advanced Cell Biology3.0
BIO 635Advanced Genetics and Molecular Biology3.0
BIO 679Issues in Scientific Research3.0
ENVS 506Biostatistics3.0
Bioscience (BIO) or Environmental Science (ENVS) electives *30.0
Total Credits45.0

*

*Non-thesis students may elect to take up to 4 credits of BIO 997 Research in Bioscience.

 

Bioscience Electives Include:
BIO 530Microbial Genetics5.0
BIO 566Endocrinology4.0
BIO 610Biochemistry of Metabolism3.0
BIO 615Proteins3.0
BIO 620Biomembranes3.0
BIO 625Nucleic Acids3.0
BIO 631Bioinformatics I3.0
BIO 644Human Genetics3.0
BIO 646Stem Cell Research3.0
BIO 649Recombinant DNA Laboratory5.0
BIO 650Virology3.0
BIO 663Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration3.0
BIO 670Medical Microbiology3.0
BIO 675Advanced Immunology3.0
BIO 680Special Topics9.0

PhD in Biological Sciences

The Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences program is conferred in recognition of breadth of scholarship and scientific attainment plus demonstrated ability to complete original research.

The following general requirements must be satisfied in order to complete the PhD program in Biological Sciences:

  • 90 (post-bac) or 45 (post-MS) credit hours total
  • establishing a plan of study
  • 7 core courses
  • additional courses dependent on advisor or committee recommendations
  • candidacy exam/approval of dissertation proposal
  • dissertation/thesis
  • defense of dissertation/thesis
  • a graduate research seminar presentation once a year for second, third, and fourth-year students.

Thesis Advisor/Plan of Study

For students admitted without an identified thesis advisor, the thesis advisor must be selected by the end of winter term in the first year. All students are asked to submit a plan of study (that has been agreed upon by the thesis advisor and student) by the end of winter term first year. It is anticipated that the graduate coursework will be completed during the first two years or less.

Students should check with the department for a list of available electives.

Core Requirement Courses:
BIO 500Biochemistry I3.0
BIO 532Advanced Cell Biology3.0
BIO 540Readings in Molecular and Cellular Bioscience and Biotechnology3.0
BIO 601Research Methods3.0
BIO 635Advanced Genetics and Molecular Biology3.0
BIO 679Issues in Scientific Research3.0
ENVS 506Biostatistics3.0
Total Credits21.0

 

 

Sample Sequence/Sample Plan of Study

First Year
FallCredits
BIO 500Biochemistry I3.0
BIO 532Advanced Cell Biology3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Winter
BIO 540Readings in Molecular and Cellular Bioscience and Biotechnology3.0
BIO 635Advanced Genetics and Molecular Biology3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Spring
BIO 601Research Methods3.0
ENVS 506Biostatistics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Second Year
Fall
BIO 679Issues in Scientific Research3.0
Elective3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Winter
BIO 620Biomembranes3.0
 Term Credits3.0
Spring
BIO 620Biomembranes3.0
 Term Credits3.0
Total Credit: 30.0


Contact the Department of Biology at (215) 895-2624 for more information.

Courses

BIO 500 Biochemistry I 3.0 Credits

Covers the fundamentals underlying the energetics and kinetics of macromolecular interactions of enzymes, membranes and nucleic acids in living systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 501 Biochemistry Laboratory I 2.0 Credits

Accompanies BIO 500.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C], BMES 501 [Min Grade: C] (Can be taken Concurrently)

BIO 509 Comparative Physiology Laboratory 2.0 Credits

Computational laboratory examining quantitative facets of vertebrate physiology through simulation experiments. Complements BIO 510 Comparative Physiology. Example systems examined include gas and solute exchangers, open vs. closed circulations, and thermoregulatory controllers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 510 [Min Grade: C] (Can be taken Concurrently)

BIO 510 Comparative Physiology 3.0 Credits

Physiology of vertebrate and invertebrate animals focusing on how organisms meet environmental challenges (e.g., aquatic respiration). Focus is on mechanisms of homeostasis, particularly those significantly different from processes in human physiology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 526 Immunology 3.0 Credits

Covers the fundamental concepts f innate and adaptive immunity, including the molecular and cellular mechanisms that generate responses to a broad spectrum of infectious threats, self/non-self recognition, immune regulation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 530 Microbial Genetics 5.0 Credits

Covers genetic organization and regulation in viruses (primarily bacteriophages), bacteria, fungi, and algae; techniques of genetic manipulation of microbial genomes; genetic interactions of microbes under natural conditions; and the use of microbial modification in industrial processes.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 532 Advanced Cell Biology 3.0 Credits

This course covers the essentials of cell biology and discusses the life and behavior of cells in the context of the molecules that underlie and drive these processes. In particular, the course focuses on regulation and how integration and coordination is required for normal cell behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 540 Readings in Molecular and Cellular Bioscience and Biotechnology 3.0 Credits

A reading course for first year graduate students based on current manuscripts from the primary literature. The goals of this course are from students to be exposed to the most current findings using primary literature, become skilled in critically reading the primary literature, and to gain experience in making presentation based on a set of papers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 551 Genetic Regulation of Development 3.0 Credits

Covers molecular and genetic control of morphogenesis and cellular differentiation. Focuses of differential gene function and the interaction between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 562 Biology of Neuron Function 3.0 Credits

Covers molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying neuron function. Topics include: molecular and cellular biology of neurons and neural development; molecular biology and physiology of sensory and motor neurons; molecular biology of muscle function; molecular and cellular basis of learning and memory in model organisms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 565 Neurobiology of Disease 3.0 Credits

The objective of the course is to provide a basic understanding of molecular and cellular biology of disorders of the human nervous system. Advances developed from experimental models that have armed clinicians and basic scientists with new tools for diagnosis and treatment of disease and injury will be presented.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 566 Endocrinology 4.0 Credits

Describes the classical hormones, their regulation and major clinical abnormalities. New directions in endocrinology, such as cellular regulation and cellular mediators of hormonal action are also considered. The major focus of the course will be on mammals, although some examples involving other vertebrates will be included.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 570 Teratology 3.0 Credits

This course will expand on the concepts of developmental biology by examining the agents that interfere with normal development. We will be exploring these agents through presentations and discussion of current peer reviewed literature. The focus will be on an understanding of mechanisms of action and how they are influenced by dose, pharmacology and genetics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 601 Research Methods 3.0 Credits

This course will provide graduate students in the biological and environmental sciences with the fundamentals needed to develop effective research questions and to design sound approaches to address these questions. A critical component of this course will be development of a research proposal with feedback from the instructor and student colleagues.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is BIO or major is ENVS.

BIO 610 Biochemistry of Metabolism 3.0 Credits

Covers how enzymes function and form metabolic pathways, how the pathways fit into cell physiology, and how these pathways are regulated. Overall considers how organisms digest nutrients and utilize them to support life. The terminology and technology commonly employed in contemporary biochemistry laboratories are emphasized.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 611 Biochemistry Laboratory II 2.0 Credits

Accompanies BIO 610.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Corequisite: BIO 610

BIO 613 Genomics 3.0 Credits

This course aims to elucidate current technologies, theory, and applications of genomic research. Though a large emphasis will be placed on the use of genomic tools to study human health, we will also study the genomes, transcriptomes, and proteomes of bacteria, fungi, plants, and other animals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 615 Proteins 3.0 Credits

Discusses protein structure, function, and isolation. Emphasizes biochemical, biophysical, and molecular biological techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 616 Biochemistry of Major Diseases 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the biochemical bases of several selected human disorders including neoplasm, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes and obesity. Biochemical changes and their regulation by signaling pathways under the disease conditions will be examined. The relevance of diagnosis and treatment will be discussed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 620 Biomembranes 3.0 Credits

Covers biochemical properties of membranes and membrane components, including phase properties, structure, organization, permeability, transport, and biosynthesis of membrane components.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 625 Nucleic Acids 3.0 Credits

Discusses nucleic acid biochemistry. Emphasizes nucleic acid separation techniques, sequencing, and synthesis techniques, as well as methods of physical analysis. Uses current and classical literature as information sources.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 630 Cell Biology of Disease 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the pathobiology of human disease as it relates to principles of cytoskeleton and membrane biology. The course reviews basic intracellular mechanisms and examines how they go awry in respiratory, heart and kidney diseases, diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration and during viral and microbial infections.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 631 Bioinformatics I 3.0 Credits

This course uses a combination of lecture and hands-on exercises to develop computational, algorithmic, and database navigation skills utilized in the analysis of genes and genomes. Topics include genomic databases, genome annotation, sequence alignment, metagenomic analyses, and phytogenetics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 633 Bioinformatics I Laboratory 2.0 Credits

In this course, students develop and apply computational skills in bioinformatics to address a quarter-long research project. Topics generally focus on the ecology and evolution of microbes, which have become much easier to study thanks to the advent of molecular tools and software for the analysis of DNA sequences.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 631 [Min Grade: C] (Can be taken Concurrently)

BIO 635 Advanced Genetics and Molecular Biology 3.0 Credits

Covers classical prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics; DNA/RNA structure; DNA replication, transcription, translation and their regulation; major molecular techniques used in the analysis of genes and genomes. Includes readings from primary literature, covering recent advances and classical experiments in genetics, genomics and molecular biology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 640 Biometry 3.0 Credits

Provides a computational introduction to probability and data analysis via descriptive and inferential statistics for biological scientists with an emphasis on understanding statistics as probability statements about the inherently noisy data commonly encountered by biologists.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 641 Data Analysis in Biosciences 3.0 Credits

Covers the application of computer programs to the analysis of biological data. Focuses on the use of software for microcomputers and mainframes (SAS) for analysis of data and interpretation of results. Also covers use of computers for experiment design. Offered once per year in alternate terms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 642 Modeling Methods in Biology I 3.0 Credits

Offers practical experience in modeling simple biological systems. Presents applications of linear, trigonometric, and exponential functions in biology. Covers the use of differential and integral calculus, simple differential equations, and the Eulerian approach to simulation; emphasizes practical computational use of such tools in biological problems. Offered in alternate years.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 122

BIO 643 Modeling Methods in Biology II 3.0 Credits

Offers a practical introduction to modeling of dynamic biological processes, including deterministic and stochastic processes. Emphasizes the development and construction of working models of real biological systems and interpretation of results. Discusses both mechanistic and empirical/predictive models. Covers Euler and Runge-Kutta techniques, and feedback loops. Emphasizes practical simulation throughout. Allows students to develop their own model of a real-world biological process. Offered in alternate years.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is BMS.
Prerequisites: BIO 642 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 644 Human Genetics 3.0 Credits

Covers the fundamentals and principles of genetics with an emphasis on their relevance to human genetics and disease. Topics include human genetic disorders, pedigree analysis and genetic testing, cytogenetics, epigenetics of cancer, gene therapy, stem cell research and human genomics and biotechnology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 646 Stem Cell Research 3.0 Credits

This course will focus on recent and important topics relevant to stem cell research and development. Topics will include nuclear reprogramming and epigenetics, environmental influences on stem cell differentiation, stem cells and cancer, stem-cell-based therapies for heart and neurogenerative disorders, stem cells and ageing, and politics of stem cell research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 648 Signal Transduction 3.0 Credits

This course will focus on the mechanisms of cell-cell communication and signal transduction in eukaryotic organisms. It will present an overview for the general mechanisms of different signaling pathways, and will also discuss in detail the molecular mechanisms by which these signal transduction pathways are regulated in a developmental context.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 649 Recombinant DNA Laboratory 5.0 Credits

This course gives a practical introduction to the basis of recombinant DNA manipulation in the laboratory. Students learn the theory behind how DNA functions and how to experimentally test these functions in the laboratory setting. Basic and advanced techniques are covered in this course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 650 Virology 3.0 Credits

Discusses major viral groups, including biochemistry and molecular genetics of viral replication, structure, gene expression, latency, and role in disease.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 660 Microbial Physiology 3.0 Credits

Covers the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms. Emphasizes aspects unique to prokaryotes, including envelope structure, chemotaxis, transport systems, modes of nutrition, biosynthesis, growth, and mechanisms of action of antibiotics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 663 Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration 3.0 Credits

This is an advanced course on the current, primary literature in the area of neurodegeneration. Students are expected to be conversant in areas of Genetics, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Neurobiology. This is a discussion course based on reading current manuscripts from the primary literature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 532 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 670 Medical Microbiology 3.0 Credits

Covers infectious diseases in humans, including mechanisms of pathogenicity, techniques of diagnosis, modes of transmission, and methods of treatment.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 675 Advanced Immunology 3.0 Credits

Covers failure in hose defense, immunotherapies, clinical concepts in immunology, and emerging concepts in immunology research. Material is presented in a combination of a Lecture and Journal club format with a focus on class participation, presentation and discussion.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 526 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 679 Issues in Scientific Research 3.0 Credits

The course will cover topics related to the appropriate and correct conduct of personnel in a research setting. Issues will be discussed dealing with choosing a research mentor, how to record data, authorship and publication, and the correct and ethical treatment of animal and human subjects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BIO 500 [Min Grade: C]

BIO 680 Special Topics 9.0 Credits

Covers special topics of current interest on an individual or group basis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BIO 799 Independent Study 3.0 Credits

Provides independent study in Biological Sciences.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BIO 864 Graduate Research Seminar 1.5 Credit

This research seminar is a forum for Biology PhD students to present on their research to faculty and graduate student peers. Discussion of the scientific content as well as feedback on presentation style and quality follows every presentation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is BIO or major is ENVS and program is MS or MSES or PHD.

BIO 865 Biology Department Research Seminar 1.5 Credit

This weekly research seminar provides a forum for international and national leaders in Biology to present the latest finding from their specialty.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BIO 898 Master's Thesis 0.5-20.0 Credits

Master's thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BIO 997 Research in Bioscience 0.5-20.0 Credits

Research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BIO 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-12.0 Credit

Ph.D. dissertation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Biology Faculty

Shivanthi Anandan, PhD (University of California, Los Angeles). Associate Professor. Microbial genetics, in particular the analysis of light-regulated signal transduction pathways and the regulation of gene expression in photosynthesizing organisms.
Joseph Bentz, PhD (State University of New York). Professor. Biophysics, biochemistry and biopharmaceutics, focused on the molecular basis of biological membrane transport and fusion.
Laura Duwel, PhD (University of Cincinnati) Assistant Department Head, Department of Biology. Teaching Professor.
Felice Elefant, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Professor. Understanding the roles of two classes of chromatin regulatory proteins termed histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone demethylases.
Tali Gidalevitz, PhD (University of Chicago). Assistant Professor. Genetic and molecular pathways regulating protein folding homeostasis, and their role in protein conformation diseases, aging, and development.
Gail Hearn, PhD (Rockefeller University). Professor. The conservation of primate species on Bioko Island in Equatorial Guinea, Africa.
Mesha Hunte-Brown, PhD (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor. Stable isotopes in aquatic food webs.
Jiu Jiang, MD, PhD (Shanghai Second Medical University). Associate Research Professor. T cell immune response to virus infection in aged mice.
Karen Kabnick, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Assistant Teaching Professor. Principles and techniques in molecular biology.
Robert P. Loudon, Ph.D. (Thomas Jefferson University). Instructor. Immunology and molecular biology.
Donna Murasko, PhD (Penn State Hershey Medical Center) Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. Professor. The effects of aging on the adaptive immune response to influenza virus and retrovirus latency and reactivation.
Jacob Russell, PhD (University of Arizona). Assistant Professor. The functional significance and evolutionary histories of symbioses between insects and bacteria.
Nianli Sang, MB, PhD ((M.B., Fudan University Shanghai Medical College; Ph.D., Thomas Jefferson University). Associate Professor. Molecular and cellular biology of cancer; posttranslational modification, folding and quality control of proteins and their implication in cell physiology and human diseases.
Aleister Saunders, PhD (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) Interim Associate Department Head. Associate Professor. Identification and characterization of genes and proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.
Elias T. Spiliotis, PhD (The Johns Hopkins University). Assistant Professor. Cell polarity and cell division: regulation of cytoskeleton-dependent motility.
James R. Spotila, PhD (University of Arkansas) L. D. Betz Chair of Environmental Science. Professor. Physiological and biophysical ecology, thermoregulation of aquatic vertebrates, biology of sea turtles.
Elizabeth A. Spudich, PhD (Thomas Jefferson University). Instructor. Developmental biology, experimental teratology, and cell biology focusing on inflammation and immunology.
Jennifer Stanford, PhD (Harvard University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Approaches to improve undergraduate and graduate student learning in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and genetics.
Monica M. Togna, PhD (New Jersey Institute of Technology). Assistant Teaching Professor. Examination of the structure and function of living organisms from the cellular to the organismal level in order to better understand common physiological processes.
Jeffery L. Twiss, MD, PhD (Medical University of South Carolina) Head of the Department of Biology. Professor. Cellular and molecular biology of the nervous systems, particularly the protein dynamics of sub-cellular domains.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Beth L. Leonberg, MS, MA, RD (Colorado State University, Rowan University) Director, Didactic Program in Dietetics . Instructor. Pediatric nutrition.
Donna H. Mueller, PhD (Temple University) Registered Dietitian, Nutrition and Foods. Professor Emeritus. Clinical nutrition; pediatric nutrition; nutrition in pulmonary diseases, especially cystic fibrosis; nutrition in developmental delay; dental nutrition; dietetic education and professional development.
Jennifer Nasser, PhD (Rutgers University). Associate Professor. Dopamine-mediated mechanisms of food intake regulation in humans and its impact on metabolic homeostasis, especially as it applies to obesity, eating disorders and aging.
Mikael O'Connor, MD, PhD (MD, Johns Hopkins University; PhD, Colorado State). Associate Professor. Biophysical and physiological ecology, thermoregulation of vertebrates, ecological modeling.
Sean O'Donnell, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Professor. Tropical ecology, focusing on geographic variation and elevation effects on ecology and behavior of army ants and ant-bird interactions; neurobiology, focusing on brain plasticity and brain evolution in social insects.
Jennifer Quinlan, PhD (North Carolina State University). Associate Professor. Food microbiology; microbiological quality and safety of produce, dairy and meat products in markets in high vs. low socioeconomics areas, Bacillus and Clostridium spores in food processing.
Vicki Schwartz, MS (Drexel University) Nutrition and Foods. Assistant Clinical Professor. Advanced nutrition, clinical nutrition, nutrition support.

Emeritus Faculty

Cecilie Goodrich, PhD (Harvard University). Professor Emeritus. Neuroscience and systems physiology, postnatal maturation of physiology and behavior in relation to brain immunocytochemistry.
Wayne E. Magee, PhD (University of Wisconsin). Professor Emeritus. Biochemistry and microbiology, drug delivery using phospholipid vesicles, membrane-membrane interactions, hybridoma research for monoclonal antibody production, immunotherapy, biochemical virology.
Stanley Segall, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Professor Emeritus. Flavor evaluation in foods, human organoleptic response, taste and odor, chemistry of sugars in foods, irradiation effects in foods, food science, food safety.
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