Chemistry

Master of Science: 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The Chemistry Department offers graduate programs in analytical chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, materials chemistry, physical chemistry, educational chemistry, and polymer chemistry. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the research and practical application of chemistry to challenges facing mankind.The department also encourages interdisciplinary activities. Faculty members are active participants in the environmental engineering and science and biomedical science and engineering programs; others work with physicists and biologists in areas such as atmospheric science, biochemistry, and biophysical chemistry.

The chemistry faculty wants graduate students to understand the purpose of, and need for, fundamental research while working on problems of practical interest and application to the challenges facing mankind in the modern world. Areas of research include the use of digital electronic methods to analyze trace constituents of air and water, a study of the molecules of living systems, the effects of toxic chemicals and carcinogens, synthesis and characterization of compounds of medicinal and industrial interest, methods for studying macromolecules, and characterization of transient species using lasers.

The Chemistry Department strives to maintain a community of research scholars (faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate and undergraduate students) that is large enough to provide a variety of experiences within chemistry, yet small enough to give each student individual attention. Both full- and part-time study are available.

Admission/Financial Assistance

Requirements for Admission

For admission to graduate study, the department requires a BS in chemistry or the equivalent. This requirement applies to full-time and part-time students working toward either the MS or the PhD degree. All entering MS and PhD students are required to take a series of two-hour exam in analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry to help assess their preparation for graduate work in chemistry. The scores obtained on these exams are used as a basis for course selection.

It is strongly recommended that students submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) results with their application. GRE scores are helpful to the Chemistry Department and the Office of Admissions, and are required for those students requesting financial support, i.e., a teaching assistantship (TA) and/or would like to be considered for a Dean's Scholarship or a Provost's Fellowship.

Financial Assistance

Graduate students at Drexel can obtain two main types of financial support: teaching assistantships and research assistantships. Teaching assistantships are available on a competitive basis to incoming students and are normally renewable for several years. All those requesting financial assistance must submit GRE scores.

Forms, details about requirements, and information about application deadlines are all available on the Chemistry page of Drexel's Graduate Admissions website.

Master of Science in Chemistry

Degree Requirements

The MS degree is awarded after satisfactory completion of a minimum of 45.0 credit hours in chemistry and related fields, at least 30.0 credits of which must be taken at Drexel. Both thesis and nonthesis options are available.

Course Requirements

The course requirements for both thesis and nonthesis options are one complete sequence in the major area of interest; one of the sequence courses from each of analytical, organic, polymer, and inorganic chemistry; and two courses in physical chemistry. The remaining credits may be chosen from graduate courses within the department or from other departments offering courses related to the student’s major areas.


Major Sequence9.0
Select one of the following sequences:
Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry I
Inorganic Chemistry II
Inorganic Chemistry III
Analytical Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry I
Analytical Chemistry II
Mass Spectrometry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry III
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry I
Physical Chemistry II
Quantum Chemistry Of Molecules I
Polymer Chemistry
Polymer Chemistry I
Polymer Chemistry II
Polymer Chemistry III
Additional Sequence Courses*15.0
Electives21.0
Total Credits45.0

*

One of which must be chosen from the following: CHEM 555 Quantum Chemistry Of Molecules I or CHEM 557 Physical Chemistry I.



Thesis Option

Up to 9 credits of coursework may be replaced by either CHEM 997 or by sections of CHEM 680 involving laboratory research. No later than the spring term of the first year of coursework, a student should choose a research advisor with whom to work in carrying out an original investigation in chemistry. The results will be written up in thesis form and submitted to an MS thesis committee consisting of the research advisor and two other departmental faculty appointed by the advisor. The acceptance by this committee of the MS thesis completes the thesis option requirements for the MS degree. Students in the MS program receiving financial aid from the department must elect the thesis option if they do not pursue the PhD program at Drexel.

PhD in Chemistry

Degree Requirements

The PhD degree is awarded in any of eight main areas of chemistry: analytical, atmospheric, inorganic, organic, materials, physical, educational or polymer chemistry. The degree recipient must demonstrate scholastic breadth in chemistry and contribute significantly to scientific advancement in a chosen major area. Requirements of the program include coursework, candidacy examinations, a chemical information retrieval or technical writing course, and successful completion of a publishable PhD thesis.

Course Requirements

Ninety credits of graduate-level work must be completed for the PhD degree. The Chemistry Department requires 30 credits of coursework in chemistry (outlined in the Course Requirements section of the MS program). The balance can be made up of advanced special topics courses and research credits.

Candidacy Requirements

To become a candidate for the PhD in chemistry at Drexel, a student must pass a prescribed set of cumulative examinations.

Cumulative Examinations

Written examinations designed to test a student’s background in his or her major area are given monthly during the academic year and occasionally during the summer at the discretion of the faculty. Students should begin taking these examinations after having completed three courses in the major area (usually the main sequence courses), though beginning these exams earlier is possible for well-prepared students. Students normally begin taking these examinations in the fall term of their second year.

Research Seminar

The thesis proposal seminar is designed to help the student conduct his/her research more efficiently by (i) promoting a greater fundamental understanding about the student's own specific research project and (ii) providing context and perspective about previous accomplishments in the field by other research groups as well as her/his own. The subject of the seminar will be a literature review and a description/defense of the student's research project including results of experiments and investigations already conducted as well as future work.  The examination at which the thesis proposal is defended is held no later than the end of the winter term of the second year for full-time students or the end of the spring term of the second year for part-time students. A written report is submitted to the committee no later than two weeks before the examination. A passing grade on this examination is required for continuation in the PhD program.

Thesis

A PhD thesis — the heart of the PhD degree — must be written, accepted by the research supervisor, presented to a PhD Thesis Examining Committee, and defended orally to the satisfaction of the Examining Committee. It is the responsibility of the student, not the research supervisor, to submit an acceptable thesis. It is expected that the students will have at least one peer-reviewed research article accepted for publication by the time of the thesis defense.

Facilities

There are seven undergraduate teaching laboratories in the department: three freshman Chemistry labs, an advanced Organic Chemistry lab, a Physical Chemistry lab, an Analytical Instrumentation Laboratory and a combined Analytical/Inorganic Chemistry lab.

Mass Spectrometry Laboratory
A Waters Autospec M high resolution mass spectrometer, a Sciex API triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a Bruker Autoflex III MALDI Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer.

Magnetic Resonance Laboratory

Varian INNOVA 300 MHz superconducting FT-NMR spectrometer, Varian INNOVA 500 MHz superconducting FT-NMR spectrometer, and a Varian X-band 12" EPR spectrometer.

Analytical Instrumentation Laboratory
The open-access departmental Analytical Instrumentation Laboratory includes two Perkin-Elmer (PE) Spectrum One Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectrometers each with a universal diamond ATR accessory, a PE Lambda-35 UV/visible spectrometer, a PE Lambda-950 UV/visible/NIR spectrometer with a 60-mm-diameter diffuse reflectance integrating sphere, a PE model 343 polarimeter, a PE LS55B luminescence spectrometer, a PE Clarus 500 capillary-column GC with dual FID detectors, a Clarus 500 capillary-column GC/MS system (with electron impact capability), a PE Series 200 Quaternary HPLC development system with UV/visible photodiode array detector, a PE Series 200 binary HPLC system interfaced to a Sciex 2000 triple quadrupole MS detector, a PE Series 2000 binary gel permeation chromatography system with refractive index detector, and  a Varian AA240FS flame atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a GTA 120 graphite furnace accessory.

Atomic Force Microscopy
The department has a Veeco multimode Atomic force microscopy (AFM) for research and education. AFM, also called scanning force microscopy (SFM), is one of the foremost tools for imaging, measuring, and manipulating matter at the nanoscale. It is when a fine tip is scanned across a surface the tip-surface force is measured to provide topographic, frictional, and adhesion information of a surface. With the ability to perform non-invasive, high-resolution surface imaging and force measurement, AFM has become an essential characterization tool in multiple disciplines in life science, biomedical engineering, nanoengineering, chemistry, materials science, and other related fields. 

Other Departmental Facilities
The department has a VEECO INNOVA N3 Multimode scanning probe microscope and also maintains a computational chemistry laboratory equipped with nine Dell Optiplex 620 computers running Hyperchem v 8.0. Research laboratories for each of the department faculty members are located in Disque and Stratton Halls. Instrumentation available in the research laboratories is described on individual faculty web pages. Additional full-time support includes an instrument specialist (for NMR and MS), a glassblower (Chemistry Department), two electronics specialists (College of Arts & Sciences Electronics Shop), and four machinists (Drexel University Machine Shop).

Courses

CHEM 521 Inorganic Chemistry I 3.0 Credits

Covers the principal models of inorganic chemistry: structure and bonding, interactions in the solid state, coordination compounds, complexation equilibria, and acid-base models.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 522 Inorganic Chemistry II 3.0 Credits

Covers group theory in inorganic chemistry, including crystal field descriptions of transition metal chemistry and qualitative molecular orbital approach to and spectroscopic methods for inorganic molecules.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 521 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 523 Inorganic Chemistry III 3.0 Credits

Covers constitutions and properties of organometallic compounds, including carbonyls and nitrosyls. Also covers kinetic properties of mononuclear and biometallic centers. Includes computer modeling/display of inorganic structures.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 522 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 530 Analytical Chemistry I 3.0 Credits

Covers principles and techniques of optical methods of analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 531 Analytical Chemistry II 3.0 Credits

Covers physical and chemical methods of separation, including distillation, solvent extraction, and chromatographic and ion-exchange techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 532 Analytical Chemistry III 3.0 Credits

Covers electroanalytical principles and techniques of potentiometry, voltametry, and coulometry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 541 Organic Chemistry I 3.0 Credits

Covers spectroscopic methods for the determination of the structure of organic molecules.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 542 Organic Chemistry II 3.0 Credits

Covers static and dynamic stereochemistry; conformational theory; relationships between structure and reactivity in organic reactions; and applications to asymmetric synthesis, physical measurements, and biochemical mechanisms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 543 Organic Chemistry III 3.0 Credits

Covers mechanisms of organic reactions and the techniques of studying them.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 551 Radiochemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers radioactivity; interaction of radiation with matter; radiation detectors; nuclear reactors; hot atom chemistry; carbon-14 dating; and neutron activation analysis and its applications to pottery dating, environment, lunar studies, and forensics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 554 Chemical Kinetics 3.0 Credits

Focuses on experimental and theoretical consideration of chemical reaction rates.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 555 Quantum Chemistry Of Molecules I 3.0 Credits

Covers general properties of operators; Schrodinger's equation and its solutions for a particle in a box; harmonic oscillator, tunneling problems, rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom; approximation methods; and absorption of radiation and selection rules.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 557 Physical Chemistry I 3.0 Credits

Schrodinger's equation and particle-wave duality, atomic structure and spectra, optical spectroscopy on molecules (rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra) molecular symmetry, design of modern spectrometers, magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 558 Physical Chemistry II 3.0 Credits

Covers statistical mechanics of distinguishable and indistinguishable particle systems, and thermodynamic functions for both systems and chemical equilibrium.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 557 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 561 Polymer Chemistry I 3.0 Credits

Covers step growth, polymerization (including polyesters, polycarbonate, nylon, epoxies, urethanes, and formaldehyde-based polymers), step growth kinetics, molecular weight distributions, infinite networks and gelation, techniques of polymerization, ring opening polymerization, thermodynamics of polymer solutions, biological polymers, inorganic polymers, biomedical applications, and electrically conducting polymers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 562 Polymer Chemistry II 3.0 Credits

Includes chain growth polymerization (free radical, ionic, coordination, group-transfer, radiation-induced, and electrochemical polymerizations), kinetics of chain growth polymerization, molecular weight distributions, polymerization/depolymerization equilibria, techniques of polymerization, kinetics of polymerization, reactions of polymers, degradation of polymers, chain conformation and configuration, rubber elasticity, and copolymerization.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 563 Polymer Chemistry III 3.0 Credits

Covers polymer characterization and analysis; morphology; molecular weight determination, including end group analysis, and colligative properties (vapor pressure lowering, elbullometry, cryoscopy, osmometry); light scattering; viscosity; gel permeation chromatography; sedimentation; diffusion and permeation; polymer identification; plasticizers; x-ray diffraction; thermal behavior; and spectroscopic techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 561 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 571 Chemistry of Biomolecules 3.0 Credits

This course is a chemistry-based approach to understanding the basic structure, chemical reactivity, and biological function of biomolecules – including amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids. A special emphasis will be given to topics in the frontiers of biomolecular research at the interface between chemistry and biology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 656 Quantum Chemistry of Molecules II 3.0 Credits

Continues CHEM 555. Covers matrix theory and group theory, atomic structures, and self-consistent field methods including the Hartree-Fock theory. Introduces theory of chemical bonding.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 555 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 657 Quantum Chemistry of Molecules III 3.0 Credits

Continues CHEM 656. Covers the theory of chemical bonding, scattering theory, and detailed Hartree-Fock calculations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 656 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 659 Physical Chemistry III 3.0 Credits

Covers interaction of molecules with electromagnetic radiation, including internal quantum states and structure of atoms and simple molecules, applications of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and lasers in chemistry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 558 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 680 Special Topics 9.0 Credits

Provides extended study of topics of particular interest to the class. Taught by various members of the faculty as appropriate for the given topic. Covers topics including computers in chemistry, magnetic resonance, organic synthesis, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, electronic materials, molecular modeling, atmospheric chemistry, metallobiochemistry, radiochemistry, heterocycles, and photochemistry of small molecules.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 751 Magnetic Resonance In Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers basic principles of electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance; interpretation of chemical shifts, spin-spin couplings, and spin relaxation; and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 752 Biophysical Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Thermodynamics and kinetics to aqueous biological systems. Properties and behavior of biological macromolecules.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 753 Chemical Instrumentation 5.0 Credits

Provides hands-on training in the use of various spectroscopic (FT-IR, UV/VIS, fluorescence, AA), chromatographic (packed and capillary column GC, HPLC), and electrochemical (potentiometry, coulometry, polarography) techniques. Involves lectures with self-paced laboratory work.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Junior or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

CHEM 755 Mass Spectrometry 3.0 Credits

Covers basic interpretive skills for organic and biochemical analysis; basic ion optics design using SIMON; survey of ionization methods, ion selection or separation techniques, and detectors; and applications in chemistry and biology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 767 Chemical Information Retrieval 0.5-20.0 Credits

Examines methods for retrieving literature information, via standard tabulations, journals, and abstracts, using hard-copy and electronic sources. Includes techniques for online searching of databases such as Chemical Abstracts, Beilstein, and crystallographic depositories.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 771 Organometallic Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers compounds with metal-carbon bonds, including molecular and electronic structures and bonding descriptions, constitutions, reactivities, and syntheses of main-group and transition metal carbonyl, alkene, alkyne, alkyl, and arene complexes and clusters.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 521 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 772 Inorganic Biochemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers chemistry of metal ions in biological systems and biomimetic ligands and complexes. Includes metal ion chemistry in aqueous environments and structure and behavior of metalloproteins.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 521 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 773 The Solid State 3.0 Credits

Covers types of bonding in solids, lattice specific heat, phonons, thermal conductivity, free electron gas, band theory of metals and semiconductors, intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductivity, and magnetic properties and superconductivity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 774 Electrochemistry for Chemists 4.5 Credits

Covers potentiometric, coulometric, voltammetric, and potential-step methods for eliciting electron-transfer thermodynamic and kinetic information from chemical and biological systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 780 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Laboratory 3.0 Credits

This course provides theory and technical applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to the solution of structural problems in Chemistry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 782 Electronics for Chemical Instrumentation 4.0 Credits

Covers digital electronics for chemical instrumentation, including Boolean algebra and its applications to digital circuits, implementation of basic Boolean operations with solid-state devices, and applications of digital circuits to chemical instrumentation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 783 Electronics for Chemical Instrumentation ll 3.0 Credits

Instrument components such as temperature, pressure, and light radiance controllers, etc. will be designed in the lectures and built and tested in the laboratory on the test board built by the student. It contains regulated +15, -15 and 5 regulated power supplies. Same sided wire wrap sockets allow amplifiers and other circuit elements to be easily and reliably mounted and connected. The test board belongs to the student.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 788 Atmospheric Radioactivity 0.5-20.0 Credits

Covers naturally occurring and anthropogenic radionuclides of significance in the earth's atmosphere, including their application as tracers of air mass movement, atmospheric dynamics, and other characteristics. Discusses important methods and techniques of measurement. Requires a term paper from students receiving 5 hours of credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 789 Experimental Design and Statistics in Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers descriptive statistics; single and multiple linear regression techniques for analytical calibration; analysis of variance methods; basic experimental design, including full and fractional factorial techniques; and experimental optimization using steepest ascent and simplex techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 792 Advanced Organic Synthesis I 3.0-5.0 Credits

Covers organic functional group transformation and manipulation. Includes oxidations, reductions, additions to pi bonds, substitution reactions including aromatic substitutions, and reactions of electron-deficient intermediates.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 793 Advanced Organic Synthesis II 3.0,5.0 Credits

Covers carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, organometallic reagents, cycloaddition reactions, and multistep synthesis of complex organic molecules including natural products.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHEM 794 Topics in Organic Reactor Mechanics 0.5-9.0 Credits

Covers current topics in organic reaction mechanisms, with emphasis on understanding the fundamental rules that govern the course and reactivity of chemical reactions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 541 [Min Grade: C] and CHEM 542 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 796 Heterocyclic Chemistry 0.5-20.0 Credits

Explores general trends in the synthesis, reactions, and properties of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heterocycles, with emphasis on their applications to the synthesis of bioactive materials.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 541 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 797 The Organic Chemistry of Sulfur and Selenium 0.5-20.0 Credits

Covers fundamentals of organosulfur and organoselenium chemistry, with emphasis on the application of these elements to asymmetric synthesis and the synthesis of natural products.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHEM 541 [Min Grade: C] and CHEM 542 [Min Grade: C]

CHEM 862 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 0.5-9.0 Credits

Covers specialized principles of inorganic chemistry plus contemporary advances in the field. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 865 Chemistry Research Seminar 9.0 Credits

Provides presentation and discussion of current research topics in chemistry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 866 Topics in Polymer Chemistry 3.0 Credits

Covers fundamental concepts in conductivity, magnetism and optical properties, or organic and polymeric materials; elements of the organic solid state; chemical and electrochemical synthesis; structure characterization; and properties and applications of these polymers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 868 Topics in Analytical Chemistry 5.0 Credits

Surveys new or developing instrumental or chemical analysis techniques. Covers spectroscopic, chromatographic, and/or electrochemical techniques for analysis of solutions or surfaces.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 898 Master's Thesis 0.5-9.0 Credits

M.S. thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 997 Research 1.0-12.0 Credit

Requires students to select a topic for investigation and obtain the approval of the staff member in charge of the project. The hours and credits are determined for each individual.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHEM 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-12.0 Credit

Ph.D. dissertation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CHEM.

Chemistry Faculty

Anthony W. Addison, PhD (University of Kent at Canterbury, England). Professor. Design and synthesis of novel biomimetic and oligonuclear chelates of copper, nickel, iron, ruthenium and vanadium; their interpretation by magnetochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic methods, including electron spin resonance; CD and ESR spectroscopy and kinetics for elucidation of molecular architecture of derivatives (including NO) of oxygen-binding and electron-transfer heme- and non-heme iron metalloproteins of vertebrate and invertebrate origins; energy-transfer by Ru, Ir and lanthanide-containing molecules and assemblies.
Jean-Claude Bradley, PhD (University of Ottawa). Associate Professor. The synthesis of novel anti-malarial agents from virtual combinatorial libraries of Ugi products.
Joe P. Foley, PhD (University of Florida) Associate Department Head. Professor. Separation science, especially the fundamentals and biomedical/pharmaceutical applications of the following voltage- or pressure-driven separation techniques: capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrokinetic chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, and high-performance and two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC). Within these techniques, we explore novel separation modes (e.g., dual-opposite-injection CE and sequential elution LC), novel surfactant aggregate pseudophases, and chiral separations.
Monica Ilies, PhD (Polytechnic University of Bucharest). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Haifeng Frank Ji, PhD (Chinese Academy of Sciences). Associate Professor. Micromechancial sensors for biological and environmental applications; nanomechanical drug screening technology; drug discovery; nanotechnology for energy applications.
Daniel B. King, PhD (University of Miami). Associate Professor. Assessment of active learning methods and technology in chemistry courses; incorporation of environmental data into chemistry classroom modules; development of hands-on activities and laboratory experiments.
Daniel A. Kleier, PhD (University of Notre Dame). Associate Teaching Professor.
Kevin G. Owens, PhD (Indiana University). Associate Professor. Mass spectrometry research, including the development of sample preparation techniques for quantitative analysis and mass spectrometric imaging using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) techniques for both biological and synthetic polymer systems, the development of laser spectroscopic techniques for combustion analysis, and the development of correlation analysis and other chemometric techniques for automating the analysis of mass spectral information.
Lynn S. Penn, PhD (Bryn Mawr College). Professor. Surface modification for specific applications: chemically derivatize metal and ceramic solid surfaces; designing and executing sequential chemical processes, building complex and layered structures on surfaces, with specific focus on behavior of polymer brushes (investigating the fundamental transport-selective behavior of polymer brushes because of potential in drug delivery, biomedical devices and as an explanation of some biological processes).
Carey M. Rosenthal, PhD (Harvard University). Associate Professor. Studies in optimum control theory, with particular emphasis on understanding the landscape of the parameter space. Current work includes extension of results for unconstrained problems, where the landscape is well understood, to problems with constraints. In the unconstrained case, there are no suboptimal solutions, so numerical procedures do not encounter "traps." To what extent does this feature apply to constrained problems?
Susan A. Rutkowsky, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Louis Scerbo, PhD (Oregon State University at Corvallis). Associate Professor. Membrane structures and function.
Dora Schnur, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Reinhard Schweitzer-Stenner, PhD (Universitat Bremen) Department Head, Chemistry. Professor. Exploring conformational ensembles of unfolded or partially folded peptides and proteins; determining the parameters governing peptide self-aggregation; structure and function of heme proteins; investigating protein-membrane interactions; use of IR, VCD, Raman, NMR and absorption spectroscopy for structure analysis.
Karl Sohlberg, PhD (University of Delaware). Associate Professor. Computational and theoretical materials-related chemistry: (1) complex catalytic materials; (2) mechanical and electrical molecular devices.
Peter A. Wade, PhD (Purdue University). Associate Professor. Exploration of a newly discovered [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement in which O-allyl nitronic esters are thermally converted to γ,δ-unsaturated nitro compounds; development and exploitation of a carbon-based hemiacetal mimic; and exploration of cycloaddition reactions involving nitroethylene derivatives and novel nitrile oxides.
Anthony Wambsgans, PhD (Rice University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Bryan M. Wong, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Computational chemistry: time-dependent density functional theory for photovoltaic materials, electronic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes, quantum confinement effects in semiconductor nanowires, first-principles calculations for nanomaterials, and large-scale ab initio calculations to predict growth of graphene nanostructures.
Jun Xi, PhD (Cornell University). Associate Teaching Professor.
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