Communication, Culture and Media

Major: Communication, Culture and Media
Degrees Awarded: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 90.0 (Post-Bachelors) or 45.0 (Post-Masters)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 09.0102
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code:
25-1122

About the Program

The PhD program in Communication, Culture and Media develops innovative scholar-teachers who know how to impart theories and studies on the interaction of social forces and communication. Our graduates are trained as committed researchers in quantitative and qualitative approaches to communication study. The program also encourages interdisciplinary approaches to the study of communication and media through faculty strengths in anthropology, communication, linguistics and sociology.

Click here for more information about the Master of Science (MS) in Communication.

Additional Information

Visit the Department of Communication website for more information.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the PhD program will be evaluated by the Department's Graduate Committee for admission to the program. Prospective students must submit with their application:

  • a 1,500 word statement of purpose
  • three letters of recommendation
  • transcripts of all college-level coursework
  • GRE scores
  • for international students where English is not the official language, TOEFL or other English language proficiency scores are also required. For more information regarding international applicant requirements, view the International Students Admissions Information page.

Minimum criteria include:

  • Completion of a BA or BS degree in an appropriate field
  • GPA of 3.0 or higher (preferred GPA 3.5 for courses in the major)
  • For international students, a TOEFL score of 600 (100 iBT) or equivalent.

Students entering the program with a Master’s degree or with some graduate credit will be evaluated by the Graduate Committee as to how many of their courses could possibly be counted toward the PhD. Students entering with an MS in an appropriate field are required by the university to take a minimum of 15 credit hours in the PhD program before being eligible to take qualifying exams.

For additional information on how to apply, visit the Drexel University Requirements for Admissions page.

Degree Requirements

The PhD requires a minimum of 90.0 credits beyond a Bachelor’s degree, including 45.0 credit hours of coursework prior to taking qualifying exams, 15.0 credit hours of coursework after exams, and 30.0 hours of research credits.

The PhD coursework is structured around a set of required core courses, a set of required seminars with rotating topics, and electives in graduate communication lecture courses, independent study work, and dissertation credit.

All students in the program take five common core courses. They then take no less than five courses chosen from Com 800 level seminar offerings. Students are encouraged to take additional seminars after meeting that requirement, since seminar courses enable collaborative relationships with professors and introduce students to the scholarly community.

After completing the core requirements and a sequence of seminars, students are expected to take a minimum of 10 additional courses from existing graduate level lecture courses (depending on their interests and research needs). Students may take up to two graduate courses (six credits) outside the department. Additional credits to meet the 90.0 credit requirements will come from independent study and dissertation credits.

Student advising will include appointments with both graduate director and an assigned mentor during the first two weeks of fall courses, where an individualized plan of study (University form D1) will be completed and approved by the program director. 


Core Courses
COM 701Contemporary Social Theory3.0
COM 702Communication Theory I3.0
COM 703Communication Theory II3.0
COM 704Research Methods in Communication3.0
COM 705Data Analysis in Communication3.0
Seminars
Students select 15 credits from the five categories of seminars *
COM 801Seminar in Contemporary Theory3.0
COM 802Seminar in Discourse and Semiotics3.0
COM 803Seminar in Structural and Cultural Dynamics3.0
COM 804Seminar in Research Methodology3.0
COM 805Seminar in Communication Ethics3.0
Communication Lecture Electives30.0
Ten courses are required, for a total of 30.0 credit hours of electives. These may be chosen from COM 500 to 800 level courses, including 800 level seminars that are a different topic from earlier courses taken.
Dissertation Credits/Additional Electives **30.0
For the dissertation, students work with a principal advisor, one of the Culture and Communication Department faculty, and no less than two additional faculty from within the department. Students must find one additional outside reader, and students may bring in up to two outside readers.
Total Credits90.0

 

*

There are five categories of seminar: one in which students learn advanced work and influences on a specific theorist or theoretical school; one in which students learn about theories of language, discourse and the sign; one that teaches the paradigm of structural dynamics central to social sciences theory and research; one in which students study a research methods approach; and one that deals with approaches to research ethics. Students must take a seminar in each area (COM 801, COM 802, COM 803, COM 804, COM 805). Seminars can be repeated, with a maximum of three courses taken in each area, as long as the subject covered is different each time.

**

Students may take up to two graduate-level courses outside of the Department of Culture and Communication.


Qualifying Examinations

After students have completed 45.0 credits, which will usually be at the end of their 6th term, they will be required to take a qualifying examination. The qualifying exam includes of three parts: theory, methods and a content area. Students will be given the grade of fail, pass or high pass on the exam. A grade of pass in all three sections of the exam will be required to qualify for the PhD. Students who do not pass one out of three sections of the exam on the first attempt may retake the section that they failed one time to qualify for the PhD. If they do not pass the second time they take the failed section of the exam they will be dismissed from the program. When a student passes all three sections of the exam, the proper paperwork will be filed with the university graduate office and they will be advanced to candidacy.

Dissertation Defense

Students should defend the dissertation and graduate towards the end of their fourth or fifth year, depending on whether they entered the program with a Masters degree.

 Visit the Department of Communication website for more information.

Courses

COM 500 Reading & Res Communication 3.0 Credits

Introduces graduate study in the communication program. Presents issues and concepts for this course and other graduate courses. Focuses on issues such as reading complex texts, both theoretical and research-oriented. Also introduces the range of fields in professional communication.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 510 Technical Writing 3.0 Credits

An intensive workshop course in writing technical abstracts, proposals, manuals and reports. Focuses on developing reader-centered documents for a variety of audiences and purposes through the use of a number of styles. Aids students in developing greater awareness of the varieties of rhetorical situations and styles found in their careers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 520 Science Writing 3.0 Credits

An intensive workshop course in communicating scientific information to the public, including reading and discussion of science journalism. Focus is placed on how to translate and reinterpret technical and scientific information for a general readership.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 530 Techniques and Science of Photography 3.0 Credits

Introduces the techniques of photography. Enhances students understanding of photography to better enable them to use photographs and services of photographers as communicative media.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 540 Technical and Science Graphics 3.0 Credits

Covers the design and production of graphic materials for technical and scientific purposes. Allows students to begin to understand the visual aspects of communication. Focuses on the use of type, art, and photographs to reinforce the written message.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 550 Video Production for Science & Technology 3.0 Credits

Introduce the techniques of studio and field video production for technical and science subjects. Teaches students to produce their own video for training purposes or information access.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 570 Technical and Science Editing 3.0 Credits

Covers techniques of formal editing, including project and copy editing. Requires students to read, discuss and edit numerous types of documents from professional, government and industry sources.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 605 Sports Journalism 3.0 Credits

This course enables students to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning-making power of sports journalism. In it, we explore the changing role of the sports journalist, from the mythmaking and hero-worship seen during the field's infancy, to the detachment and devotion to the craft of journalism that marked sports reporting beginning in the mid-20th Century.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 610 Theories of Communication and Persuasion 3.0 Credits

Examines the application of theories and models of communication and persuasion. Introduces theories underlying technical communication and issues informing the discipline. Draws readings from a number of disciplines, such as rhetoric, cognitive psychology, discourse analysis, linguistics, and communication.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 611 Interconnections: Science, Technology, Literature and the Arts 3.0 Credits

Examines issues concerning relations among science, technology, literature, and the arts, and leads students to learn something if the nature of science and technology and explore the contribution of literature, the arts, and aesthetic theory to effective science and the technical communication.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 612 Ethics for Science and Technical Communication 3.0 Credits

Studies principles and concepts of ethics for technical and scientific writers, editors and publishers. Examines moral presuppositions of the profession as they pertain to technical and scientific communications, to the effects of computer technologies on ethical practices in the workplace, and to the responsibilities of editors for preventing fraud.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 613 Ethics for Public Communication 3.0 Credits

This course is a seminar in journalism and public relations ethics. Topics discussed include: professional responsibilities of journalists with respect to truth-telling and objectivity in reporting the news; ethical issues surrounding morally offensive radio and television content; ethical issues concerning what is and is not covered by the news and manipulative advertising.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 616 Campaigns for Health and Environment 3.0 Credits

This reading and writing intensive, seminar-style course explores theories and practical aspects of environmental information campaigns and community-based social marketing campaigns. The theories and frameworks presented in this course apply to health issues as well as environmental issues. This course has a strong applied component.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 617 [WI] Environmental Communication 3.0 Credits

This reading and writing intensive course will explore communication about environmental issues. Topics can include advocacy campaigns, social marketing, environmental journalism, media coverage of environmental issues, green marketing, the environment in popular culture, risk communication, and public participation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 620 Message Design and Evaluation 3.0 Credits

Examines research and theory on the design of messages. Introduces research methodologies appropriate for the evaluation of scientific and technical communications. Examines research in document design and usability, testing and other strategies for collecting, analyzing and presenting data.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 625 Cultural Significance of Fame 3.0 Credits

This course explores our fascination with fame and celebrity, and the desire of so many people to achieve fame: from Alexander the Great to American Idol. Key issues include: the mass media's role in creating the cultural significance of fame, psychological characteristics of fame seekers, and changes in what it means to be a fan of the famous.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 630 Software Documentation 3.0 Credits

Teaches the principles and goals involved in writing, revising, and testing computer documentation, both paper and on-line. The focus will be on the end user documentation, although the principles involved may also apply to systems documentation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 635 Electronic Publishing 3.0 Credits

Electronic Publishing gives students applied and theoretical knowledge of professional electronic publishing. Students will focus on issues relating to writing and integrating text and graphics to create websites and on-line publications. Students will also consider how issues in document design and usability analysis can be used to evaluate websites.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Junior or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

COM 640 Desktop Publishing 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on designing and developing publications using Desk Top publishing software. Students develop a publication plan for a specific organizational situation and learn basic design principles. Classes deal with planning, designing, writing and budgeting publications. Students concentrate on two major kinds of publications, brochures and newsletters, and will also learn about smaller publications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 650 Telecommunications Policy in the Information Age 3.0 Credits

The historical, governmental, social, economic and political structures of telecommunications policies are examined. Special emphasis is placed on how assumptions concerning living in an information age affect policies, philosophies, structures and outcomes, especially at a global level.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 655 Ethnography of Communication 3.0 Credits

Following an examination of theories about interaction in speech, the course provides and in-depth look at qualitative communication studies. Both transcripts of talk in natural settings and videos of actual interactions will be used. Considers such topics as story telling (narrative), self-presentation in talk (performance and identity), the construction of gender in communication, literacy, and cross-cultural approaches to politeness.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 657 Media Effects Advanced Seminar 3.0 Credits

In this course we will examine the contemporary facts and the discourse on media effects. The focus will be on electronic media.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 660 Investigative Journalism 3.0 Credits

An intensive hands-on course in researching and writing investigative news stories. Students will select and cover beats and submit a series of in-depth articles on deadline.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 663 Event Planning 3.0 Credits

This course will provide the student with the theoretical and practical fundamentals in understanding the complexities of producing special events across all major industries.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 665 Journalists, Courts and the Law 3.0 Credits

Students explore and apply techniques for covering the court system, and explore case law and recent key legal developments that have reshaped how journalists do their jobs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: COM 500 [Min Grade: C] and COM 660 [Min Grade: C]

COM 670 Medical Writing 3.0 Credits

Students learn about the major branches of medical writing and editing, for both medical and pharmaceutical contexts. The course includes the following topics: writing for professional, commercial and popular audiences, preparing FDA submissions, reading and researching medical literature, using medical statistics, interviewing subjects and writing ethically.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 673 Medical Journalism 3.0 Credits

This course teaches students how to research and write articles geared to the medical field for the mass media and public relations, and to evaluate the scientific merit of medical research relative to the pressures on scientists, doctors, researchers, companies and universities to garner media attention.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 675 Grant Writing for the Arts and Humanities 3.0 Credits

Students develop the skills needed to write an effective grant proposal. Topics include idea development, analyzing a team's capabilities to complete a project, developing a clear plan of attack, locating funding sources, honing research skills, and effectively using graphic elements in proposal design.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 680 Public Relations Writing and Strategies 3.0 Credits

An intensive, advanced public relations course covering public relations theory, strategies and writing. Students will apply theory and tactics in the development of crisis communication plans and issue management strategies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 685 International Public Relations 3.0 Credits

This course is a comprehensive overview of international issues in PR including history and evolution of the field, image-formation and image-change processes, PR in war and conflict, effects of different political and legal systems on PR, actual PR practices in different countries and regions of the world.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 686 International Communication 3.0 Credits

This course is taught within the paradigm of media ecology. Such issues as the historical context, theoretical concepts, economic and structural aspects of international communication is considered. The effects of culture, language, religion, history, politics, and tradition on the process of international communication are also examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 687 International Negotiations 3.0 Credits

This course examines theoretical and practical elements of international negotiations. Students are taken into the work of diplomats, policymakers, and corporate leaders negotiating agreements and are guided through psychological, sociological, and political dimensions of the talks process. By the end of this course students will be able to analyze negotiations scientifically and professionally.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 701 Contemporary Social Theory 3.0 Credits

This course is a graduate level introduction to social theory, familiarizing students with original works by the major theorists of the late 19th century to the present. Students will especially examine the production of social theory as an ongoing conversation about the predicaments of modernity and post-modernity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 702 Communication Theory I 3.0 Credits

This course is an introduction to the study of persuasion and media effects. Readings include elements of persuasion and compliance seeking, as well as how persuasion takes effect through mass media. Course draws liberally from contemporary research in communication literature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 703 Communication Theory II 3.0 Credits

Through readings of major theoretical ideas and voices, and occasional case examples, this course introduces students to theories of discourse and semiotics, including the role that language plays in social construction, discourse and post modernity, theories of the sign, structuralism and post-structuralism, pragmatics and language ideology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 704 Research Methods in Communication 3.0 Credits

This course familiarizes students with various quantitative research methods in communication research including analysis, survey research and experiments. Each state of the research process will be explored from hypotheses to defining and operationalizing variables. To effective sampling, to analysis and write-up. Also introduces students to a wide range of original research studies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 705 Data Analysis in Communication 3.0 Credits

Students are introduced to statistics for communication research, including quantitative analysis techniques for survey data and content analysis. Casual models, sampling and basic ideas of correlation and regression are discussed. Course is a hands-on approach with equal attention to technique and theoretical understanding, using SPSS software.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 710 Mass Communication and American Social Thought 3.0 Credits

Mass communication was at the center of most of the hopes and anxieties of the 20th Century. Would mass communication promote democracy or totalitarianism, support the powers-that-be or challenge them, make us more or less intelligent, enhance real life or distort it, etc.? In the end, what do we want mass communication to be and do in the 21st Century?.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 715 Media, Advocacy and Public Spaces 3.0 Credits

Half of the world’s population lives in cities. With this increase, notions of public space, rights of access, land use and development become highly contested. Students will conduct their own ethnographic fieldwork in urban environments that address issues of conflict that take place in or engage with urban public spaces.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 720 Critical Theory 3.0 Credits

This course provides an overview of critical theory. It starts with the creation of the critical Frankfurt School, and reviews the works of Gramsci, Adorno, Horkheimer and Marcuse. It then focuses on the expansion of critical theory by Jurgen Habermas through consideration of his Theory of Communicative Action.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: COM 701 [Min Grade: C]

COM 725 Political Communication 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the background concepts and literature in multiple areas of political communication. Material ranges from rhetoric and public relations to mass communication theory. The course objective is to equip students with the skills so that they can go on to pursue scholarly research in these areas on their own. Among other things, students will learn how to write and analyze speeches; evaluate more and less adroit responses to questions; assess media coverage of political affairs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 730 Politics of Life 3.0 Credits

In this course we will explore the sociological implications of advancements that have been made in genetic engineering, biotechnologies and other areas of biomedical research. Starting with earlier examples of "power over life" from the 18th and 19th centuries, we will explore themes, dilemmas and complications embedded in the scientific control over life. Topics to be explored include biopower and biocapital, eugenics, race and class, stewardship and bioengineering, new reproductive technologies and reproductive choice, among much, much more. Consideration to feminist, queer and critical race theories will frame much of our discussion in class. This is a reading and discussion-intense course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 731 Global Subjects of Biocapital 3.0 Credits

Students explore issues related to capitalism based on biotechologies, the life sciences, medicine, agriculture and other related industries globally. Students consider specific cases of human trafficking, the global trade in human organs, global agribusiness and biotech, global clinical trials and medical tourism. The experiences of workers, farmers, research participants, and donors will be a central focal point. This is an intensive reading, writing and discussion course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 735 Material Culture 3.0 Credits

Stuff. Things. Goods. Possessions. This course explores the relationship between human beings and the material objects that surround us. Drawing from literature in anthropology, archaeology, cultural studies, communications, and science and technology studies, we will be exploring the cultural and social life of things: how they move across borders and through our lives, how they accumulate and disperse, how they define the difference between social groups and classes, and, most of all, how they lend our lives weight and meaning. We will also be exploring the status of things in the digital age, emergent notions of materiality, and cutting edge work in "new materialism" studies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 777 Social Network Analysis 3.0 Credits

This seminar introduces social network analysis to graduate students, emphasizing its theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations. The main objective of this course is to allow students to acquire a sufficient grasp of both the classical and the contemporary network literature to enable them pursue independent advanced study, and ultimately, to contribute original research results to their disciplines. The course covers key network concepts and principles; examines data collection, measurement, and computer analysis techniques; and investigates applications in social sciences, communication, information science, public health, organizational studies, and related disciplines.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM 801 Seminar in Contemporary Theory 3.0 Credits

This is a special topics seminar course that will introduce students to different currents in contemporary social theory, especially through in-depth reading and discussion of a single major theorist or theoretical school. Course may be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

COM 802 Seminar in Discourse and Semiotics 3.0 Credits

This is a special topics seminar course that will explore in-depth a particular theoretical or research approach to the study of language and signs. Students will work with major theoretical approaches as well as research in the area. Course may be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

COM 803 Seminar in Structural and Cultural Dynamics 3.0 Credits

Through in-depth exploration of a specific research topic, this seminar course will introduce students to what is called the sociological imagination. The course examines special topics that will illuminate such broad sociological approaches as political economy, cultural analysis, neo-institutionalism or post-modernism. Course may be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

COM 804 Seminar in Research Methodology 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on a single research method. The course takes students through the inception of research ideas, research design, implementation and data-analysis/write up as the mean to understanding the limitations and possibilities of the research process according to methodology. Course paper involves student research design practicum. Course may be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

COM 805 Seminar in Communication Ethics 3.0 Credits

By in-depth examination of a single issue in research ethics, this course develops student awareness of ethical issues in processes like peer review, human subjects research evaluation, and public consumption of knowledge generated by scholarly investigation. Course may be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

COM 998 PHD Dissertation Research in Communications 1.0-12.0 Credit

Requires supervised research, including literature research, data collection, and writing of doctoral thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM I599 Independent Study in COM 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM I699 Independent Study in COM 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM I799 Independent Study in COM 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM I899 Independent Study in COM 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM I999 Independent Study in COM 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM T580 Special Topics in Communication 9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM T680 Special Topics in Communication 6.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM T780 Special Topics in COM 9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

COM T880 Special Topics in Communication 9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM T890 Special Topics in Communication 9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

COM T990 Special Topics in Communication 9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

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