Physics

Master of Science: 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The Department of Physics offers opportunities for students to study with leading researchers in astrophysics, biophysics, nonlinear dynamics, particle physics, and solid state physics, as well as to participate in international collaborations. Coursework for the MS and PhD degrees includes advanced training in core areas of physics and in the topics of current research. PhD students begin research early in the program, commencing thesis work in their second year of study.

To learn more about the graduate program in physics visit the Physics Department webpage.


 

Admission Requirements

For admission to the graduate programs, a bachelor's degree in an approved program is required with a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0/4.0 specified.

The GRE Subject Test is required for PhD applicants to be considered for assistantships.

  • minimum Quantitative Score = 150 (650 on previous 800-point scale)
  • minimum Verbal Score = 150 (450 on previous 800-point scale).

Students from non-English speaking countries are required to demonstrate proficiency in English via the TOEFL exam. TOEFL scores are required for international applicants or applicants who earned a degree outside the US (minimum scores: 100/600/250). Scores will be reviewed based on section scores and total scores. IELTS scores may be submitted in lieu of TOEFL scores. The minimum IELTS band score is 7.0. Teaching assistants educated in non-English speaking countries must complete a special English program.

Visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information about requirements and deadlines, as well as instructions for applying online.

Master of Science in Physics

Students who wish to complete only the master's degree are welcomed, and will find that the learning environment will allow them to broaden their professional understanding by exploring current topics and trends of physics in an interdisciplinary setting.

 There are no thesis, language, or special examination requirements for the master's degree.

The degree requires 45.0 graduate credits, with at least 30.0 credits from the following:

PHYS 501Mathematical Physics I3.0
PHYS 502Mathematical Physics II3.0
PHYS 506Dynamics I3.0
PHYS 511Electromagnetic Theory I3.0
PHYS 512Electromagnetic Theory II3.0
PHYS 516Quantum Mechanics I3.0
PHYS 517Quantum Mechanics II3.0
PHYS 518Quantum Mechanics III3.0
PHYS 521Statistical Mechanics I3.0
PHYS 522Statistical Mechanics II3.0


PhD in Physics

 90.0 quarter credits

The Department of Physics offers opportunities for students to study with leading researchers in astrophysics, biophysics, nonlinear dynamics, particle physics, and solid state physics, as well as to participate in international collaborations. Coursework for the PhD degree includes advanced training in core areas of physics and topics of current research. PhD students begin research early in the program, commencing thesis work in their second year of study.

The usual schedule for physics graduate students consists of two years of coursework, qualifying exams, and research training, followed by dissertation research. All PhD students follow a common set of ten core courses during their first two years of study. In addition to these core courses, students also take four special topics courses.

PhD students Admitted with Post-Master's Status

Students who are admitted for PhD study with “post-masters” status must take 15 credits of graduate coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.0 to become doctoral candidates. Courses are to be chosen in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. Post-masters students are expected to pass the written and oral qualifying exams by the end of the Spring quarter of their first year of study. Ordinarily, this means taking the written qualifying exam in September before the start of classes. To be prepared for the oral exam, post-masters students should begin research as soon as possible.

Program Requirements

Doctoral candidates are required to complete a minimum of 45.0 credits of coursework and research work beyond the master’s requirement of 45.0 credits while maintaining a minimum of 3.0 GPA.

Core Courses
First Year
PHYS 501Mathematical Physics I3.0
PHYS 506Dynamics I3.0
PHYS 502Mathematical Physics II3.0
PHYS 516Quantum Mechanics I3.0
PHYS 521Statistical Mechanics I3.0
PHYS 517Quantum Mechanics II3.0
Second Year
PHYS 522Statistical Mechanics II3.0
PHYS 518Quantum Mechanics III3.0
PHYS 511Electromagnetic Theory I3.0
PHYS 512Electromagnetic Theory II3.0
Select four of the following:12.0
Galactic Dynamics
Cosmology
Biophysics
Nanoscience
Computational Biophysics
Single Molecule Methods
Nonlinear Dynamics
Nuclear and Particle Physics
Solid State Physics I
Special Topics
Total Credits42.0

Research Training

Students begin research in the first year with two small projects. In the spring quarter, this project culminates in a talk presented to the other students and Director of Graduate Studies. In the summer quarter, the project requires a written report to the research advisor. Research during the second year is toward the oral qualifying exam, described below.

Candidacy Examination

PhD candidates must pass a Candidacy Examination, which consist of two parts: written and oral:

  • The written portion of the qualifying examination is given twice a year, during the week before the fall quarter begins and during the first week of classes of the winter term. Students must pass the written qualifying examination no later than the winter quarter of their second year. At most two attempts may be made at passing the exam. The qualifying examination covers four general areas at the advanced undergraduate level: classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, and statistical physics.
  • The oral portion of the qualifying exam is based on original research performed by the student, which consists in an oral presentation and a written report of no less than 15 pages, submitted to the examination committee and the Director of Graduate Studies at least one week prior to the exam. Immediately after the public presentation, the Examination Committee will privately conduct an oral examination. This exam must be passed by the end of the second year of study.

Dissertation Defense

This dissertation defense includes a final public presentation and defense of the dissertation. The dissertation must be submitted to the Examination Committee at least two weeks prior to the oral defense. The oral presentation involves a public 45-60 minute presentation by the candidate followed by an unspecified period during which the Examination Committee will ask questions. All doctoral dissertations, in addition to originality and scholarly content, must conform to University format requirements.

Plan of Study (PhD) 

The following sample plan of study contains the required courses for full-time PhD students entering without a previous Master’s degree. Post-master's students should consult the Director of Graduate Studies.

First Year
FallCredits
PHYS 501Mathematical Physics I3.0
PHYS 506Dynamics I3.0
Special Topics Course*3.0
 Term Credits9.0
Winter
PHYS 502Mathematical Physics II3.0
PHYS 516Quantum Mechanics I3.0
Special Topics Course*3.0
 Term Credits9.0
Spring
PHYS 521Statistical Mechanics I3.0
PHYS 517Quantum Mechanics II3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Second Year
Fall
PHYS 522Statistical Mechanics II3.0
PHYS 518Quantum Mechanics III3.0
Special Topics Course*3.0
 Term Credits9.0
Winter
PHYS 511Electromagnetic Theory I3.0
Special Topics Course*3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Spring
PHYS 512Electromagnetic Theory II3.0
PHYS 997Research1.0-12.0
 Term Credits4.0-15.0
Total Credit: 43.0-54.0

*

Special topics courses are an introduction to current topics of experimental and theoretical interest. They are offered in alternate years.

 

Academic Year 2013/2014 (odd)

FallCredits
PHYS 531Galactic Dynamics3.0
PHYS 561Biophysics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Winter
PHYS 532Cosmology3.0
PHYS 562Computational Biophysics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Spring
PHYS 563Single Molecule Methods3.0
PHYS 750 (Quantum Field Theory)Special Topics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Total Credit: 18.0

 

Academic Year 2013/2013 (even)

FallCredits
PHYS 626Solid State Physics I3.0
PHYS 576Nuclear and Particle Physics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Winter
PHYS 553Nanoscience3.0
PHYS 571Nonlinear Dynamics3.0
 Term Credits6.0
Spring
To be announced 
 Term Credits0.0
Total Credit: 12.0

 

Additional information for graduate students is available at the Department of Physics.


Facilities

Astrophysics Facilities

  • Numerical Astrophysics Facility, primarily networked LINUX workstations emphasizes theoretical and numerical studies of stars, star clusters, the early universe, galaxy distributions, cosmology modeling and gravitational lensing. Large file server provides access to Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. The facility also employs special purpose high performance computers, such as the Gravity Pipeline Engine (GRAPE), a new Beowulf cluster (128 processors, 128G RAM, 2TB RAID disk), and a system using Graphics Processing Units to achieve computational speeds of up to trillion floating point operations per second.
  • The Joseph R. Lynch Observatory houses a 16 inch MEAD Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope equipped with SBIG CCD camera. Drexel is a participant in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which operates a 2.5m telescope at Apache Point, NM, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to be built in Chile (first light 2020).

Biophysics Facilities

  • Modulated excitation kinetics laboratory uses frequency domain techniques to follow internal dynamics of biological molecules.
  • Energy Materials Research Laboratory including Variable Temperature UHV Scanning Probe Microscope, installed in STC-50 rated acoustic chamber.
  • Spatially resolved kinetics laboratory uses simultaneously resolved spatio-temporal data at microscopic resolution to follow biological self-assembly processes, such as polymerization of sickly hemoglobin.
  • Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) facility to study the structure and interaction of macromolecule via imaging, and to investigate the mechanical and kinetic properties of individual protein molecules via nanomanipulation.
  • Computational Biophysics facility including two Beowulf clusters (44-node dual-core Xeon, 43-note dual quad-core Xeon [344 cores]), 24TB RAID disk server, and ten Linux workstations connected through a gigabit network (3).
  • Preparative laboratory provides facilities for biological sample purification and characterization.

Condensed Matter Facilities

  • Ultra-low temperature laboratory has a dilution refrigerator, 3He and 4He cryostats and microwave sources to study quantum phenomena in nano and microscale devices, superconducting qubits, nanostructures and quantum fluids and solids.
  • Magnetic material laboratory conducts research on amorphous magnetic thin films, fiber optical sensors.
  • Surface science laboratory has scanning probe microscopy to study surface structure interfaces at the atomic level.

Particle Physics Facilities

  • Detector development laboratory provides experimental support for an international research program in nonaccelerator particle and nuclear physics performing tests of invariance principles and conservation laws, and neutrino oscillations.

General Support Facilities

  • Include an electronics shop capable of custom design and fabrication of electronics and computer components, and a machine shop to assist in the design, construction, and repair of mechanical components.

 


 

Courses

PHYS 501 Mathematical Physics I 3.0 Credits

Covers various topics in mathematical physics and their numerical implementations, including calculus of residues and further applications of complex variables; vector spaces, Fourier series, and generalized functions; integral transforms; theory and application of ordinary and partial differential equations; special functions; boundary value and initial value problems; Green's function theory and applications; and integral equations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 502 Mathematical Physics II 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 501.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 503 Mathematical Physics III 3.0 Credits

Calculus of residues and further applications of complex variables; vector spaces, Fourier series and generalized functions; integral transforms; theory and application of ordinary and partial differential equations; special functions; boundary value and initial value problems; Green's function theory and applications; integral equations; group theory; nonlinear dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 506 Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Covers Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulations, variational principles, particle kinematics and dynamics, and small oscillations and normal modes.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 507 Dynamics II 3.0 Credits

Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulations; variational principles; particle kinematics and dynamics; small oscillations and normal modes; Navier-Stokes equations; statistical description of turbulent flows; thermodynamics and energetics of ideal gases; computational fluid dynamics; viscous and compressible flows; boundary-layer flows; hydrodynamic perturbation and stability theory; nonlinear dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 508 Dynamics III 3.0 Credits

Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulations; variational principles; particle kinematics and dynamics; small oscillations and normal modes; Navier-Stokes equations; statistical description of turbulent flows; thermodynamics and energetics of ideal gases; computational fluid dynamics; viscous and compressible flows; boundary-layer flows; hydrodynamic perturbation and stability theory; nonlinear dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 511 Electromagnetic Theory I 3.0 Credits

Covers electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic waves, boundary value problems of electromagnetic theory, theory of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, classical electrodynamics, special relativity, waveguides, and radiation theory.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 512 Electromagnetic Theory II 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 511.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 513 Electromagnetic Theory III 3.0 Credits

Electrostatics; magnetostatics; electromagnetic waves; boundary value problems of electromagnetic theory; theory of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction; classical electrodynamics; special relativity; waveguides; radiation theory; plasmas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 516 Quantum Mechanics I 3.0 Credits

Covers axioms of quantum mechanics and the basic mathematical tools, one-dimensional Schrodinger equation, spin and general two-level systems, harmonic oscillator, general theory of angular momentum, hydrogen atom, elements of atomic spectroscopy, quantum theory of scattering, electron spin, addition of angular momenta, stationary and time-dependent perturbation theory, fine and hyperfine structure of the hydrogen atom, interaction of light and matter, and Dirac Equation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 517 Quantum Mechanics II 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 516.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 518 Quantum Mechanics III 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 517.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 521 Statistical Mechanics I 3.0 Credits

Covers thermodynamics; probability theory; Gibbs-Boltzmann formulation; relation between density of states and entropy; partition functions; ensembles; Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac, phonon, photon, and electron systems; and phase transitions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 522 Statistical Mechanics II 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 521.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 523 Statistical Mechanics III 3.0 Credits

Thermodynamics; probability theory; Gibbs-Boltzmann formulation; relation between density of states and entropy; partition functions; ensembles; Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac, phonon, photon, and electron systems; phase transitions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 531 Galactic Dynamics 3.0 Credits

Covers dynamical problems in astrophysics, including the two-body problem, galactic stability, globular clusters, spiral arms, and galactic collisions. Computational methods such as calculation of grid-based and particle-based potentials will also be discussed and applied.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 532 Cosmology 3.0 Credits

Covers cosmological models, age and distance scales in the universe, the hot big bang, primordial nucleosynthesis, inflation, baryonic and non-baryonic matter, galaxy formation and evolution, dynamics of structure formation, statistics of cosmological density fields, and cosmic background fluctuations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 541 Atmospheric Physics I 3.0 Credits

Chemical composition, transformation and evolution; radiation spectra, absorption, scattering and heat transfer; thermodynamics and cloud and precipitation microphysics; surface fluxes, thermal structure and energy balance; optics and acoustics: observational methods and remote-sensing techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 542 Atmospheric Physics II 3.0 Credits

Chemical composition, transformation and evolution; radiation spectra, absorption, scattering and heat transfer; thermodynamics and cloud and precipitation microphysics; surface fluxes, thermal structure and energy balance; optics and acoustics: observational methods and remote-sensing techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 543 Atmospheric Physics III 3.0 Credits

Chemical composition, transformation and evolution; radiation spectra, absorption, scattering and heat transfer; thermodynamics and cloud and precipitation microphysics; surface fluxes, thermal structure and energy balance; optics and acoustics: observational methods and remote-sensing techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 544 Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Theoretical thermodynamics and atmospheric energetics; flow on a rotating sphere; general circulation; barotropic and baroclinic instability; cyclonic circulations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 545 Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics II 3.0 Credits

Theoretical thermodynamics and atmospheric energetics; flow on a rotating sphere; general circulation; barotropic and baroclinic instability; cyclonic circulations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 546 Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics III 3.0 Credits

Theoretical thermodynamics and atmospheric energetics; flow on a rotating sphere; general circulation; barotropic and baroclinic instability; cyclonic circulations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 547 Small Scale Atmospheric Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Theory of turbulent flows and perturbation analysis of waves; boundary-layer processes, including diffusion; storm microphysics and dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 548 Small Scale Atmospheric Dynamics II 3.0 Credits

Theory of turbulent flows and perturbation analysis of waves; boundary-layer processes, including diffusion; storm microphysics and dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 549 Small Scale Atmospheric Dynamics III 3.0 Credits

Theory of turbulent flows and perturbation analysis of waves; boundary-layer processes, including diffusion; storm microphysics and dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 553 Nanoscience 3.0 Credits

Physical basis of nanoscale materials and systems including discussion of low-dimensional structures and their physical properties, the self-assembly of nanostructures, applications in various fields of science and technology, and techniques for fabrication and characterization on the nanoscale.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 561 Biophysics 3.0 Credits

A one-course introduction to Biophysics. Topics may include structure of biomolecules, protein stability, electron transfer, protein folding, protein substrates, allostery, and self-assembly. No biological background is assumed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 562 Computational Biophysics 3.0 Credits

Covers mathematical applications of biological simulations. Using classical and statistical mechanics, we will cover topics including atomic scale simulations, statistical sampling, and models of molecular cellular systems and living processes.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 563 Single Molecule Methods 3.0 Credits

Covers the principles, operations and applications of the most commonly used single molecule methods in biophysics, including scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy, optical trapping and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 571 Nonlinear Dynamics 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the basic ideas of the new science of nonlinear dynamics and develops methods to carry out fundamental computations of fractal dimension, Lyapunov exponents, and topological invariants.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 576 Introduction to Particle Physics 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the physics of fundamental particles. Topics include the fundamental forces, quarks and leptons, Feynman diagrams, symmetries and conservation laws, relativistic kinematics, bound states, and experimental methods.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 601 Advanced Quantum Mechanics I 3.0 Credits

Relativistic one-particle quantum mechanics; Dirac theory radiation theory; free fields; interactions; quantum electrodynamics; introduction to elementary particle theory; quantum chromodynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 602 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II 3.0 Credits

Relativistic one-particle quantum mechanics; Dirac theory radiation theory; free fields; interactions; quantum electrodynamics; introduction to elementary particle theory; quantum chromodynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 603 Advanced Quantum Mechanics III 3.0 Credits

Relativistic one-particle quantum mechanics; Dirac theory radiation theory; free fields; interactions; quantum electrodynamics; introduction to elementary particle theory; quantum chromodynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 626 Solid State Physics I 3.0 Credits

Crystal lattices; Bloch theorem; classical and quantum theory of lattice vibrations; phonons, electron states in solids; calculation of energy bands and Fermi surfaces; dynamics of electrons in metals; electron-electron interactions; plasmons; electron-phonon interactions; polarons; semiconductor and insulator crystals; transport properties of solids; thermal properties; optical properties; magnetism; magnons; superconductivity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 627 Solid State Physics II 3.0 Credits

Crystal lattices; Bloch theorem; classical and quantum theory of lattice vibrations; phonons, electron states in solids; calculation of energy bands and Fermi surfaces; dynamics of electrons in metals; electron-electron interactions; plasmons; electron-phonon interactions; polarons; semiconductor and insulator crystals; transport properties of solids; thermal properties; optical properties; magnetism; magnons; superconductivity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 628 Solid State Physics III 3.0 Credits

Crystal lattices; Bloch theorem; classical and quantum theory of lattice vibrations; phonons, electron states in solids; calculation of energy bands and Fermi surfaces; dynamics of electrons in metals; electron-electron interactions; plasmons; electron-phonon interactions; polarons; semiconductor and insulator crystals; transport properties of solids; thermal properties; optical properties; magnetism; magnons; superconductivity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 631 Relativity Theory I 3.0 Credits

Covers particle and field dynamics in special relativity, tensor calculus for Riemannian space-time manifolds, Einstein's gravitational field equations and their principal solutions in general relativity, black holes, general relativistic variational principles, big bang cosmology, and quantization of general relativity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 632 Relativity Theory II 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 631.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 633 Relativity Theory III 3.0 Credits

Continues PHYS 632.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 643 Physics of the Upper Atmosphere 3.0 Credits

Structure of the methods of probing the upper atmosphere; solar radiation; aurorae; cosmic rays, the ionosphere; geomagnetism, meteors.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 644 Atmospheric Numerical Prediction Techniques 3.0 Credits

Application of modern numerical methods to the prediction of atmospheric motions; initialization and assimilation methods; filtering, verification, and testing.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 645 Atmospheric Analysis Techniques 3.0 Credits

Covers analysis and interpretation of meteorological data, including statistical and objective techniques. Uses data sources including satellites, radars, and special observational networks. Includes evaluation of analysis techniques, and initialization and assimilation in numerical models.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 646 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion 3.0 Credits

Introduction to mechanics of turbulence, structure of atmospheric turbulence and its role in diffusion of contaminants.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 676 Nuclear Physics I 3.0 Credits

Review of systematics of experimental phenomena; nuclear structure theory, including shell model, interacting-boson model, Hartree-Fock approaches, and collective models; intermediate energy theory and experiment, including electron, nucleon, and pion scattering and reactions; group theoretical approaches; interfaces of quark-meson-nucleon coexistence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 677 Nuclear Physics II 3.0 Credits

Review of systematics of experimental phenomena; nuclear structure theory, including shell model, interacting-boson model, Hartree-Fock approaches, and collective models; intermediate energy theory and experiment, including electron, nucleon, and pion scattering and reactions; group theoretical approaches; interfaces of quark-meson-nucleon coexistence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 678 Nuclear Physics III 3.0 Credits

Review of systematics of experimental phenomena; nuclear structure theory, including shell model, interacting-boson model, Hartree-Fock approaches, and collective models; intermediate energy theory and experiment, including electron, nucleon, and pion scattering and reactions; group theoretical approaches; interfaces of quark-meson-nucleon coexistence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 699 Independent Study 1.0-6.0 Credit

Independent study in Physics under direction of a faculty member.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 4 times for 12 credits

PHYS 750 Special Topics 0.5-9.0 Credits

Assignment of readings and study in current topics of experimental and theoretical interest.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PHYS 865 Overview of Gradute Physics I 3.0 Credits

Methodology for efficient solution of Ph.D. candidacy exam-type problems; main quantitative theoretical relations and selected problems reviewed in mathematical physics, classical mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, statistical physics, and atomic physics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 898 Master's Thesis 0.5-20.0 Credits

Master's thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHYS 997 Research 1.0-12.0 Credit

Research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PHYS 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-12.0 Credit

Ph.D. dissertation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Physics Faculty

Alexey Aprelev, PhD (St Petersburg State University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Experimental biophysics.
S. M. Bose, PhD (University of Maryland). Professor. Theory of surfaces and interfaces, disordered systems, electron and X-ray spectroscopy of solids, high-temperature superconductivity.
Luis R. Cruz Cruz, PhD (MIT). Associate Professor. Correlation studies and density map analysis of the loss of spatial organization of neurons in the aged brain: computational studies of the folding of the Alzheimer amyloid beta protein using all-atom molecular dynamics:cellular automata models of the growth of plaques in Alzheimer's disease: fluid flow through porous media using computer lattice models.
N. John Dinardo, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Vice Provost for Academic Affairs. Professor. Vibrational and electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces and interfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, polymer surfaces and interfaces, diamond-like carbon thin films, and protein and cell interactions with biomaterials surfaces.
Michelle Dolinski, PhD (University of California, Berkeley). Assistant Professor. Neutrino physics, rare nuclear decays, cyrogenic detector technologies.
Frank A. Ferrone, PhD (Princeton University). Professor. Experimental and theoretical protein dynamics, kinetics of biological self-assembly, including sickle cell and Alzheimer's disease.
Robert Gilmore, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Professor. Applications of compact and non-compact Lie algebras for problems in nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics; nonlinear dynamics and chaos and the analysis of chaotic data.
David M. Goldberg, PhD (Princeton University) Director of Undergraduate Studies. Professor. Theoretical and computational cosmology, extragalactic astrophysics, parallel computing.
Goran Karapetrov, PhD (Oregon State University). Associate Professor. Experimental solid state physics, scanning probe microscopy, nanoscale catalysis, mesoscopic superconductivity.
Charles Lane, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Professor. Experimental tests of invariance principles and conservation laws, experimental search for magnetic monopoles and high-energy cosmic neutrinos, solar neutrinos and neutrino oscillations.
Teck-Kah Lim, PhD (University of Adelaide) Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. Professor. Structures and dynamics of small nuclear and molecular systems, spin-polarized quantum systems, physics in two dimensions. Physics education.
Hairong Ma, PhD (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign). Assistant Professor. Protein folding, aggregation and mechanics; ultrafast laser spectroscopy; and microfluidics-integrated live-cell imaging of biomolecular dynamics.
Stephen L. W. McMillan, PhD (Harvard University) Interim Department Head, Physics. Professor. Stellar dynamics, large-scale computations of stellar systems, and high-performance special-purpose computers.
Kevin Olson, PhD (University of Massachusetts). Research Associate Professor. Development of parallel and numerical algorithms for astrophysics applications.
Gordon Richards, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Quasars, active galactic nuclei, supermassive black holes, sky surveys, gravitational lensing, galaxy evolution.
Richard I Steinberg, PhD (Yale University). Professor. Experimental tests of invariance principles and conservation laws, experimental search for magnetic monopoles and high-energy cosmic neutrinos (MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso Laboratory, Italy), solar neutrinos and neutrino oscillations (CHOOZ project).
Somdev Tyagi, PhD (Brigham Young University). Professor. Nanobiophysics, Raman spectroscopy, magnetic materials.
Brigita Urbanc, PhD (University of Ljubljana, Slovenia). Associate Professor. Landau-Ginsburg theory of ferroelectric liquid crystals; cellular automaton model of Alzheimer's senile plaque growth; protein folding and assembly relevant to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; discrete (discontinuous) molecular dynamics simulations and coarse-grain protein models; applications of automated neuron recognition and density map methods to quantify spatial correlations in aging brain.
Michel Vallières, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Shell-model and mean field studies of nuclei on and off beta-stability, chaotic scattering, computational physics.
Michael Vogeley, PhD (Harvard University) Director of Graduate Studies. Professor. Cosmology; galaxy formation and evolution; statistical analysis of large data sets; active galactic nuclei.
Jian-Min Yuan, PhD (University of Chicago). Professor. Protein folding, signal transduction pathways, computational biophysics, nonlinear dynamics and chaos in atomic and molecular systems, protein folding.

Emeritus Faculty

Leonard D. Cohen, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus.
Richard D. Haracz, PhD (Wayne State University). Professor Emeritus.
Arthur P. Joblin, PhD (Drexel University). Professor Emeritus.
Donald C. Larson, PhD (Harvard University). Professor Emeritus.
Arthur E. Lord, PhD (Columbia University). Professor Emeritus.
James McCray, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Professor Emeritus.
T. S. Venkataraman, PhD (Worcester Polytechnic Institute). Professor Emeritus. Material engineering and physics.
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