Chemical Engineering

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (MSCHE): 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The graduate program in the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department integrates current chemical engineering science with the growing fields of engineering applications and processes, emphasizing engineering design and scientific analysis. The department intends to develop broadly educated individuals who are knowledgeable in modern theories, cognizant of the behavior of engineering systems, and aware of current mathematical and engineering tools that are useful for the solution of problems in complex processes and systems, especially those in the fields of chemical, environmental, biochemical, and materials process engineering. Areas of particular strength include biological engineering, energy and the environment, multiscale modeling and process systems engineering, and polymer science and engineering.

Programs are arranged to meet the needs and interests of individual students. The plan of study is initially formulated in consultation with the departmental graduate advisor and subsequently guided by the thesis advisor.

Graduates have pursued a variety of careers, ranging from faculty positions in academia to research and development in industry, in the U.S. and overseas.

Additional Information

For more information about this program, visit Drexel University's Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering web page.

Admission Requirements

Students should fulfill Drexel University's general requirements for admission to graduate studies. The subjects normally included in an undergraduate program in chemical engineering provide a satisfactory background. Decisions regarding prerequisite qualifications for students who may be deficient in some areas are made after consultation with the departmental graduate advisor.

The core courses are designed for students with undergraduate training in chemical engineering. However, students with a background in biological sciences and engineering can also enroll in the core courses after completing the necessary basic engineering courses and disciplinary chemical engineering courses. Programs for such students are determined on an individual basis after consultation with the departmental graduate advisor.

Graduate study in chemical engineering is offered on a regular full-time basis and on a part-time basis. Details not covered in the following information may be obtained by contacting the departmental graduate advisor. The General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for applicants pursuing full-time study.

Financial Assistance

Financial aid in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowship grants is available to qualified full-time PhD students. Awards are made annually on a competitive basis.

For additional information on how to apply, visit Drexel's Admissions page for Chemical Engineering.

Master of Science in Chemical Engineering

Degree Requirements

In general, each program leading to the Master of Science in Chemical Engineering must meet the following requirements: core chemical engineering, 15.0 credits; area of concentration, at least 15.0 credits; electives, at most 6.0 credits; research, at most 15.0 credits. Core courses in the chemical engineering Master's program are listed below. A Master's Thesis is optional.

Thesis option: The thesis may be based on either a theoretical or an experimental investigation, or both, of limited scope but involving a significant degree of originality. The nature of the research may involve multidisciplinary areas such as biological engineering, materials processing and engineering, energy and the environment, and other topics. The scope and content of the thesis is guided by the thesis advisor. All students pursuing a Master's with Thesis must complete 9.0 credits of thesis research (CHE 898) and, at the discretion of the research advisor, up to 6.0 credits of independent study (CHE 799). Credits not devoted to independent study may be applied to general (non-concentration) graduate-level electives or to additional credits of thesis research.

Coursework-only (non-Thesis) option: Students not pursuing Master's with Thesis may take up to 9.0 credits of independent study (CHE 799) and 6.0 credits of general graduate-level electives. Independent study is not required for a non-thesis Master's. Non-thesis students may also take additional concentration electives beyond the required 15.0-credit series. Non-thesis students may not register for thesis research.

Concentration: All Master's students must complete a 15-credit series of concentration electives. Concentration electives may be chosen from course offerings in chemical engineering, mathematics, science, and other engineering disciplines, and are subject to approval by the departmental graduate advisor. Sample concentration series courses are listed below; there are many other possibilities. Non-concentration electives need only be graduate-level.

Full-time students usually take the core courses in the first year. Other courses may be substituted for the core courses, if equivalent courses are available and if the substitution is approved by the graduate advisor. Full-time students normally require a minimum of one calendar year to complete their study and research. Some courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening for the convenience of part-time students. The current schedule of evening courses for part-time students are available upon request.


Curriculum
CHE 502Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering3.0
CHE 513Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics3.0
CHE 525Transport Phenomena I3.0
CHE 543Kinetics & Catalysis I3.0
CHE 554Process Systems Engineering3.0
Area of Concentration15.0
Thesis/Research9.0
Electives6.0
Sample Areas of Concentration
Biochemical Engineering
Sample Courses
Biochemistry I
Biochemistry of Metabolism
Medical Sciences I
Bioreactor Engineering
Unit Operations in Bioprocess Systems
Computer Science
Sample Courses
Operating Systems
Compiler Construction I
Compiler Construction II
Programming Languages
Engineering Management
Sample Courses
Engineering Management
Advanced Engineering Management
Engineering Management Communications
Engineering Economic Evaluation & Analysis
Human Relations and Organizational Behavior
Environmental Engineering
Sample Courses
Chemistry of the Environment
Fate of Pollutants in Air and Water
Env Engr Op-Chem & Phys
Enviro Engr Unit Oper-Bio
Spec Topics Envr Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Sample Courses
Structure and Properties of Metals
Structure and Properties of Polymers
Structure and Properties of Ceramic and Electronic Materials
Phase Equilibria
Kinetics
Total Credits45.0

PhD in Chemical Engineering

Superior students with MS or BS degrees will be considered for the doctoral program in chemical engineering. Students joining with a Master’s degree may satisfy up to 45.0 credit hours of the PhD course/research credit requirements depending on the courses taken and/or research carried out in their Master’s programs, subject to approval by graduate program advisor.

Requirements

The following general requirements must be satisfied in order to complete the PhD in chemical engineering:

  • 90 credit hours total
  • Qualifying exam (first year)
  • Establishing a plan of study (first term)
  • 18 core credits
  • 15 credit hours of specialized plan of study
  • 57 credit hours of research
  • Candidacy exam (5th term)
  • Dissertation/Thesis
  • Defense of Dissertation/Thesis
  • GPA requirements: 3.0 overall; 3.0 in graduate Chemical Engineering (CHE) courses; 3.0 core graduate courses

Qualifying Exam

The qualifying exam takes place in the first year. The department administers the exam twice a year – in January and June. The objective of the exam is to evaluate proficiency in core undergraduate chemical engineering material. The format is made up of seven problems, each covering a separate core topic from the undergraduate curriculum, including thermodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, fluid mechanics, kinetics, control, and separations. Students must display mastery of five out of the seven topics to pass the qualifying exam. Each student will be given two opportunities to pass the qualifying exam.

Thesis Advisor/Plan of Study

All students must meet with their advisor in their first term to work out a plan of study. 


Core Requirements
CHE 502Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering3.0
CHE 513Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics3.0
CHE 525Transport Phenomena I3.0
CHE 543Kinetics & Catalysis I3.0
CHE 614Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II3.0
CHE 626Transport Phenomena II3.0
Specialized Plan of Study Courses15.0
15.0 credit hours of courses approved by research advisor. All students are expected to develop competence in their area(s) of specialization.
Research57.0
57.0 credit hours of research (CHE 998), which may include up to 6.0 credit hours of electives.
Ph.D. Dissertation
Total Credits90.0

 

Candidacy Exam

The components of the candidacy exam are as follows::

  • Proposal Document (Written): The student is required to write a research proposal of about 15 pages, including background, preliminary results, and a research plan (with his/her advisor's input). The proposal must be submitted to each member of the student’s thesis committee and to the Graduate Program Advisor before 5:00 pm on the first day of the student's 5th term.
  • Proposal Defense (Oral): The student provides a formal defense of his/her proposal to his/her thesis committee before the end of the student's 5th term.

Thesis/Dissertation and Defense

As the culmination of intensive study and independent research, the doctoral dissertation represents a major scholarly endeavor; accordingly, it is recognized as the most important requirement of the degree. All doctoral candidates must present an acceptable dissertation based on significant work. The dissertation must represent a unique contribution to chemical engineering or biochemical engineering knowledge. A final oral examination is conducted, in part, as a defense of the dissertation.

A preliminary exam is targeted for the student's 12th term, with this scheduling subject to the research advisor's discretion. This preliminary exam is to ensure that the student has made adequate progress in his/her project and that he/she has gained skills to write an independent research proposal.

The requirements of the thesis/dissertation and defense include:

  • Proposal Document, a.k.a. “Second Proposal”: The student is required to write a research proposal of about 15 pages, including background, summary of results to date, and a plan for completion of the thesis work (with minimal advisor input). The proposal must be submitted to each member of the student’s thesis committee well in advance of the oral exam date.
  • Preliminary Defense (Oral Examination): The student must defend the second proposal and the thesis work to-date in an oral examination by his/her thesis committee.
  • Manuscript Submission: Before taking the preliminary exam, the student is required to submit at least one paper based on his/her PhD research to a refereed journal. This must be an original article, not a review.
  • A copy of the written proposal, together with a copy of the submitted paper with acknowledgment of submission from the journal editor, must be submitted to the Graduate Program Advisor before the Preliminary Defense and at least 6 months before the Thesis Defense.
  • The student is responsible for scheduling the Preliminary Defense
  • Students should submit a copy of the Preliminary Exam Reporting Form no later than three days after the exam.

For more information, visit the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department web page.

Facilities

Abrams Laboratory (ABRAMS)

Cat-472 (Server room) and Cat-361 (Student offices)

  • High-performance computer clusters
    • lamneth -- 90-core DDR Infiniband
    • narpet -- 40-core DDR Infiniband
  • Workstation computers (panacea, maelstrom, cygnus, redstar, syrinx, presto)
  • 24TB RAID server (nlgn)

Access to:

  • The University Research Computing Facility (URCF)
  • The Draco Cluster (Dept. Physics)
  • TeraGrid/XSEDE Allocation (TACC Stampede)

Nanomaterials for Energy Applications and Technology Laboratory (BAXTER)

Cat-266

  • Amplified Ti:Sapphire laser with time-resolved teraherterz spectroscopy and femtosecond UV/vis/NIR transient absorption spectroscopy (Bossone 106)
  • Solar simulator with monochromator and photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical test station
  • Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
  • Layer-by-layer deposition robot
  • Dip coater
  • Spin coater
  • Electrodeposition station
  • Continuous flow microreactors

Biofuels Laboratory (CAIRNCROSS)

Cat-265

  • Bubble column biodiesel reactors
  • Recirculating heated oil baths
  • Quartz crystal microbalance / heat conduction calorimeter (Masscal G1)
  • Maxtek quartz crystal microbalance with phase lock oscillator
  • Parr reactor

Elabd Laboratory (ELABD)

Cat-262, 263, 264

  • Electrochemical Impedance Spectrometer (EIS) (Solartron: 1260 impedance analyzer, 1287 electrochemical interface, Zplot software) with many custom made 4 and 2 electrode cells
  • Fuel Cell Test Station (Scribner 850C with fuel cell software) equipped for gas and liquid fuels and PEM and AEM test cells
  • FTIR spectrometer (Nicolet Nexus 6700) equipped with multiple multi-bounce ATR flow-through cell attachments (Specac)
  • FTIR spectrometer (Nicolet Nexus 6700)
  • Golden GateTM diamond single-bounce ATR attachment (Specac)
  • Silver GateTM zinc selenide single-bounce ATR attachment (Specac)
  • Silver GateTM germanium single-bounce ATR attachment retrofit for electrochemical measurements (Specac)
  • Dynamic Vapor Sorption (DVS) (TA Instruments Q5000 SA)
  • Dynamic Vapor Sorption (DVS) with Cahn balance (Surface Measurement Systems)
  • Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) (TA Instruments Q200) with cooling accessory with temperature range of -180 to 725oC
  • Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) (Waters Breeze 2) with 1525 Binary HPLC Pump for two separate columns (columns for THF and DMF), 214 Refractive Index Detector
  • Environmental Chamber (Tenney) with high temperature/humidity control ranging from 25-200oC and 5-95%RH and integrated with vapor permeation and EIS
  • Electrospinning Apparatus with custom-built enclosed chamber, 2 syringe pumps, and high voltage power supply (Glassman High Voltage, Inc. Series EL)
  • Multipycnometer (Quantachrome)
  • Two Liquid Diffusion Cells (PermeGear) integrated to flow-through ATR cell for detection with temperature control
  • Vapor Sorption Apparatus (custom-built) with pressure transducer, temperature-controlled chamber, and quartz springs for the measurement of vapor and vapor mixture diffusion and sorption in polymers. This equipment is also integrated to an FTIR-ATR spectrometer for the measurement of molecular transport of pure vapors and vapor mixtures in polymers
  • Gas Permeation and Sorption Apparatus (custom-built) with pressure and sorption cells, pressure transducer, and temperature-controlled chamber for the measurement of gas permeation and sorption in polymers
  • Mass Spectrometer (MS) (HP 5989B), Gas Chromatograph (GC) (HP 5890), Liquid Chromatograph (LC) (HP 1090)
  • Gravimetric Balances (Precisa XR 125 SM-FR, 10 μg accuracy; Mettler Toledo AB 54-S, 100 μg accuracy; Mettler Toledo B2002-S, 10 mg accuracy)
  • Sonicators (QSONICA Q125, Cole-Parmer 8890)
  • Heat Press (Carver 3351-0)
  • Charged-Coupled Device (CCD) camera (Cognex in-sight 5403 vision sensor with patmax)
  • Tube Furnace (Barnstead/Thermolyne 21100)
  • Convection Oven
  • Three Vacuum Ovens
  • Three Vacuum Pumps
  • 2x Water Bath (Thermo Scientific Neslab RTE 10)
  • Rotary Evaporator (Buchi Rotovapor®)
  • Many stir/hot plates and other wet chemistry accessories

Nanofibers for Energy Storage and Conversion Laboratory (KALRA)

Cat-471

  • Four Electrospinning Staions (with core-shell spinning capability)
  • Tube Furnaces/Convection Ovens/Vacumm Ovens
  • Mbraun Dual User Glove Box
  • Carver Heat Press
  • Gamry Ref 3000 Potentiostat
  • 32-channel Maccor Battery Cycler

Access to:

  • Drexel’s Centralized Research Facilties (SEM, TEM, Ultramicrotome, FTIR, XPS, XRD, Multi-angle x-ray scattering)
  • XSEDE Compute Hours Allocation
  • Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Lab
  • BET Surface are and Porosity Analyzer

Thin Film and Devices Laboratory (LAU)

CAT-382

  • Chemical Vapor Deposition Thin Film Reactor System I
  • Chemical Vapor Deposition Rotating Bed Reactor System
  • Gamry Reference 600 Electrochemical Testing Station
  • Solar Illuminator
  • Nicolet 6700 FTIR Spectrometer
  • Laurell Technologies Spin Coater

Bossone-521

  • Chemical Vapor Deposition Thin Film Reactor System II

Access to:

  • Centralized Research Facilities (SEM, TEM, XRD, SAXS, XPS, Raman, Profilometer)
  • Thermogravimetric Analyzer
  • Differential Scanning Calorimeter
  • Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer
  • UV-Vis Spectrophotometer

Biosensor and Bioanalytics Laboratory (MUTHARASAN)

Cat-466, 469

  • Custom-built bio-analytical flow apparatus for conducting  in situ surface chemistry and detection assays of pathogens, biomarkers, DNA and RNA
  • Impedance Analyzers Agilent 4294A and Agilent HP4192A with bridge circuits for device characterization
  • Electrochemical Impedance Spectrometer, Gamry Interface 1000 with three electrode cells, and interfaces to biosensor flow cell; Ag/AgCl and Pt electrodes
  • Stanford Research System QCM200 and flow cells 
  • Signal Recovery 875 Lock-In amplifier (plus computer-interface)
  • Function/Arbitrary Waveform Generator, 80 MHz Agilent 33250A
  • Agilent precision Giga-ohmmeter
  • Bausch & Lomb optical Microscopes interfaced with image acquisition system
  • Olympus OM-10 Fluorescence Microscope, coupled to Canon digital imaging and video systems
  • PTI SS Fluorescence Spectrometer with PMT 750 detector
  • UV-VIS spectrometer – Shimadzu UV-1800
  • Denton Desktop high vacuum sputtering system; 6-inch target, one or two cathode configuration, Base vacuum 10-6
  • Harrick RF Plasma Reactor (Model PDC-001, 200 W) modified for conducting plasma-assisted surface reactions
  • UVP UV Radiation Oven, Model OG-1. Radiation at 185 and 254 nm
  • 1550 nm DFB laser (Anritsu GB5A016) and  1310 nm DFB laser (QPhotonics), and associated power supplies
  • High speed micro-centrifuge (200 – 15000 rpm)
  • Vacuum ovens
  • Incubators, 9 ft3, 20-70oC
  • Spectrum analyzer (ANDO AQ-6310B), LabView interface
  • Ericsson FSU 975 fusion splicer
  • Laminar Flow Hoods, Precision CO2 Incubators, Spinners, bioreactors (0.1L to 1L)

Access to:

  • Bruker Daltonics Autoflex III Smartbeam TOF-MALDI mass spectrometer
  • 8 MΩ, Milli-Q system
  • Autoclave
  • Hot room 37oC, 100 ft2
  • Refrigerated room 4oC, 100 ft2
     

Polymers and Composites Laboratory (PALMESE)

Bossone-521

  • TA Instruments TGA Q50 Thermogravimetric Analyzer
  • KSV Instruments CAM 200 Contact Angle and Surface Tension Meter
  • TA Instruments DSC Q2000 Differential Scanning Calorimeter
  • Instron 8872
  • Thermo Nicolet Nexus 870 FTIR
  • TA Instruments DMA Dynamic Mechanical Analysis
  • Perkin Elmer DSC7 Differential Scanning Calorimeter
  • Waters GPC/HPLC (RI, UV Detectors)
  • Electrospinning station
  • TA Instruments AR Rheometer
  • Thinky planetary centrifugal mixer ARE-250
  • Melt Press
  • Portable Near Infrared Spectrometer
  • Brookfield digital viscometer
  • Glove Box
  • Supercritical Dryer (2x)
  • Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma reactor

Process Systems Engineering Laboratory (SOROUSH)

  • Interacting liquid level tanks
  • 2-liter RC1 Calorimeter

Wrenn Laboratory (WRENN)

Cat-470

  • PTI, Inc. C-71 Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectrometer (pulsed nitrogen and dye lasers)
  • PTI, Inc. A-710 Steady State Fluorescence Spectrometer
  • Brookhaven 90Plus Dynamic Light Scattering Apparatus
  • Brookhaven Goniometer-based, Static Light Scattering Apparatus
  • Perkin-Elmer BUV40XW0 UV-Visible Absorbance Spectrometer
  • Zeiss Axioskop2 Fluorescence microscope
  • Zeiss Ultraviolet Digital Image Analysis System (contains Orca Camera, Sony 17” monitor, and Axiovision II software)
  • Beckman Coulter Allegra64 Centrifuge
  • Misonix, Inc. XL2020 Sonicator
  • Lipex Biomembranes, Inc. Lipid Extruder (10 mL)

Courses

CHE 502 Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering 3.0 Credits

Emphasizes formulation of differential and difference equations, both ordinary and partial, governing chemical engineering operations in the steady and unsteady state.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 513 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3.0 Credits

Examines thermodynamic principles from a classical viewpoint, including properties of materials, equations of state of mixtures, and chemical and phase equilibria of complex mixtures.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 525 Transport Phenomena I 3.0 Credits

Presents a unified treatment of transport rate theory, with emphasis on analogies among momentum, energy, and mass transfer, and continuum and molecular theories of matter.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 531 Fundamentals of Solar Cells 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the fundamentals of solar cells. It will cover semiconductor materials, basic semiconductor physics, optical and electronic phenomena, and case studies of crystalline silicon, thin film, and nanostructured photovoltaics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 534 Mass Transfer Operations I 3.0 Credits

Theory and design of equilibrium stage operations. Separation processes for binary and multicomponent mixtures.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 543 Kinetics & Catalysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers chemical reaction kinetics as applied to chemical engineering. Introduces chemical kinetics and mechanisms and heterogeneous kinetics and catalysis. Includes design of ideal and non-ideal chemical reactors.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHE 502 [Min Grade: C]

CHE 554 Process Systems Engineering 3.0 Credits

Covers the basic concepts of the systems engineering approach to the design and operation of processing plants. Includes methods for developing control strategies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHE 502 [Min Grade: C]

CHE 556 Process Optimization 3.0 Credits

Focuses on optimization of processes from the viewpoint of economic return.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 560 Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems 3.0 Credits

Covers gas-liquid mass transfer in microbial systems, mass transfer in cells and biofilms, membrane transport, fluid mechanics of fermentation broth, power consumption in agitated vessels, heat transfer, and scale-up of mass transfer equipment.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 562 Bioreactor Engineering 3.0 Credits

Covers growth and product formation kinetics, batch and continuous stirred tank bioreactors, tower reactors, immobilized-cell reactors, and immobilized-enzyme reactors.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 564 Unit Operations in Bioprocess Systems 3.0 Credits

Covers liquid-liquid extractions, membrane separations, chromatographic separations, filtration, centrifugation, distillation, and leaching.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 566 Dynamics and Control of Biological Process Systems 3.0 Credits

Dynamics of pH and temperature control systems, dynamics of bioreactors to feed upsets, substrate feed rate control, start-up of bioreactors, dynamics of multiple microbial populations, instrumentation of bioreactors, computer interfacing and control of bioreactors.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 614 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II 3.0 Credits

The second in a two-quarter sequence in thermodynamics for graduate students in Chemical and Biological Engineering. Students learn theory and application of statistical mechanics with emphasis on prediction of volumetric and thermal properties of pure fluids and mixtures, as well as phase equilibrium. Modern methods in applied statistical mechanics are covered, including Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations. Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics in terms of linear response theory applied to chemical kinetics is also covered. Students are evaluated on homework sets, two exams, and a term project.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CHE and program is PHD.
Prerequisites: CHE 513 [Min Grade: C]

CHE 626 Transport Phenomena II 3.0 Credits

Transport of mass, energy, and momentum of turbulent systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 631 Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Advanced topics in heat conduction, convection, and radiation with application to design.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 635 Mass Transfer Operations II 3.0 Credits

Theory and design of continuous contact operations including fixed-bed and fluid-bed processes.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 644 Kinetics and Catalysis II 3.0 Credits

Advanced topics in kinetics and catalysis including: diffusion and catalysis; optimization of chemical reaction systems; analysis and treatment of kinetic data.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 658 Advanced Process Design 3.0 Credits

Covers flowsheet analysis and synthesis, batch process design and scheduling, project scheduling, and economic considerations.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: CHE 502 [Min Grade: C]

CHE 670 Real-Time Microcomputer Applications 3.0 Credits

Application of microcomputers in monitoring and control of external devices and processes. Topics include: digital input/output, real-time clock, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, noise removal, signal processing, and data communications. Includes hands-on computer laboratory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

CHE 799 Independent Study in Chemical Engineering 9.0 Credits

Provides advanced independent study in chemical engineering or related interdisciplinary fields.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHE 800 Special Topics 0.5-9.0 Credits

Covers selected advanced-level topics in chemical engineering. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHE 898 Master's Thesis 9.0 Credits

Requires fundamental research in chemical engineering. Hours and credits to be arranged.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

CHE 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-9.0 Credit

Requires dissertation research in chemical engineering. Hours and credits to be arranged.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Chemical and Biological Engineering Faculty

Cameron F. Abrams, PhD (University of California, Berkeley). Professor. Molecular simulations in biophysics and materials; receptors for insulin and growth factors; and HIV-1 envelope structure and function.
Jason Baxter, PhD (University of California, Santa Barbara). Associate Professor. Solar cells, semiconductor nanomaterials, ultrafast spectroscopy.
Richard A. Cairncross, PhD (University of Minnesota). Associate Professor. Effects of microstructure on transport and properties of polymers; moisture transport and degradation on biodegradation on biodegradable polymers; production of biofuel.
Nily R. Dan, PhD (University of Minnesota). Associate Professor. Design of synthetic gene and drug carriers; design of polymeric drug carriers; metal cluster formation in polymeric matrices; colloidal absorption in patterned surfaces.
Yossef A. Elabd, PhD (Johns Hopkins University). Professor. Fuel cells; polymer membranes; diffusion in polymers.
Aaron T. Fafarman, PhD (Stanford University). Assistant Professor. Colloidal nanocrystals; solution-processed solar cells; electrical and spectroscopic characterization of nanomaterials.
Vibha Kalra, PhD (Cornell University). Assistant Professor. Nanotechnology, polymer nanocomposites.
Kenneth K.S. Lau, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Surface science; nanotechnology; polymer thin films and coatings; chemical vapor deposition.
Raj Mutharasan, PhD (Drexel University) Frank A, Fletcher Professor. Biochemical engineering; cellular metabolism in bioreactors; biosensors.
Giuseppe R. Palmese, PhD (University of Delaware) Department Head, Chemical and Biological Engineering. Professor. Reacting polymer systems; nanostructured polymers; radiation processing of materials; composites and interfaces.
George F. Rowell, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Undergraduate laboratory supervising.
Masoud Soroush, PhD (University of Michigan). Professor. Process systems engineering; polymer engineering.
John H. Speidel, BSHE, MCHE (University of Delaware; Illinois Institute of Technology). Teaching Professor.
Stephen P. Wrenn, PhD (University of Delaware) Assistant Dean of Graduate Affairs, College of Engineering. Associate Professor. Biomedical engineering; biological colloids; membrane phase behavior and cholesterol transport.

Emeritus Faculty

Charles B. Weinberger, PhD (University of Michigan). Professor Emeritus. Suspension rheology; fluid mechanics of multi-phase systems.
  • Schedule of Classes
  • All Course Descriptions
  • Co-op
  • Academic Advising
  • Admissions
  • Tuition & Fees
LEARN MORE