Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (MSME): 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (MEM) Department offers MS and PhD degrees. The courses often associate with one or more areas of specialization: design and manufacturing, mechanics, systems and control, and thermal and fluid sciences. The mechanical engineering field is rapidly changing due to ongoing advances in modern science and technology. Effective mechanical engineers must possess expertise in mechanical engineering core subjects, interdisciplinary skills, teamwork skills, as well as entrepreneurial and managerial abilities. The degree programs are designed so students can learn the state-of-the-art knowledge now, and have the foundation to acquire new knowledge as they develop in future.     

The MS degree program is offered on both a full-time and a part-time basis. The General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for applicants pursuing full-time study. Graduate courses are often scheduled in the late afternoon and evening, so full-time students and part-time students can take the same courses. The department has recently adopted the Graduate Co-op program at the master’s level as an option.

The PhD degree program is offered for full-time students only and is a research intensive program. The research areas include, but are not limited to, bio-engineering, energy systems, high performance materials, nanotechnology, plasma science and engineering, and robotics. 

Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet the graduate requirements for admission to Drexel University. Students holding a bachelor's degree in a science or engineering discipline other than mechanical engineering are advised to take several undergraduate courses as preparation for graduate studies. Though these courses are not counted toward the required credits for the degree, they also must be listed in the student's plan of study. Outstanding students with a GPA of at least 3.5 in their master’s program will be considered for admission to the program leading to the doctor of philosophy degree in mechanical engineering.

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

Requirements

The MS program has a two-fold mission: to prepare some students for continuation of their graduate studies and research toward a PhD degree, and to prepare other students for a career in industry upon graduation with the MS degree. The MS program has a non-thesis option and a thesis option. Students who plan to continue to the PhD degree are advised to select the thesis-option.

The MS program is structured so that students have the opportunity to specialize in areas of interest while also obtain the broadest engineering education possible. Of the required 45.0 credits (15 courses) MS students are required to complete two core-course sequences (two terms each) from two different core areas. Students can take eight technical elective courses of which up to four courses can be from outside the Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Department if they are approved in the students' plan of study. MS students have opportunity to apply to the optional graduate Co-op program. Students in the MS program should consult with the department graduate adviser at the beginning of their program and must file a plan of study prior to the third quarter of study. Further details can be obtained from the department's Graduate Programs Manual. 

Typical MS Program
Two Core-Course Sequences (required)12.0
Three Mathematics Courses (required) *9.0
Eight Technical Electives (including 9 credits for thesis option) 24.0
Total Credits45.0

*

Mathematics courses:  MEM 591, MEM 592, MEM 593.

 

Core Areas

All students take core courses in the department’s areas of specialization as part of a comprehensive and flexible program. Further details can be obtained from the department's Graduate Programs Manual.

The core courses in each area are listed below:

Mechanics Area
Theory of Elasticity
MEM 660Theory of Elasticity I3.0
MEM 661Theory of Elasticity II3.0
Solid Mechanics
MEM 663Continuum Mechanics3.0
MEM 664Introduction to Plasticity3.0
Advanced Dynamics
MEM 666Advanced Dynamics I3.0
MEM 667Advanced Dynamics II3.0
Systems and Control Area
Robust Control Systems
MEM 633Robust Control Systems I3.0
MEM 634Robust Control Systems II3.0
Non-Linear Control Theory
MEM 636Theory of Nonlinear Control I3.0
MEM 637Theory of Nonlinear Control II3.0
Real-Time Microcomputer Control
MEM 639Real Time Microcomputer Control I3.0
MEM 640Real Time Microcomputer Control II3.0
Thermal and Fluid Sciences Area
Advanced Thermodynamics *
MEM 601Statistical Thermodynamics I3.0
MEM 602Statistical Thermodynamics II3.0
Heat transfer
MEM 611Conduction Heat Transfer3.0
MEM 612Convection Heat Transfer3.0
or MEM 613 Radiation Heat Transfer
Fluid Mechanics *
MEM 621Foundations of Fluid Mechanics3.0
MEM 622Boundry Layers-Laminar & Turbulent3.0

 

*

Consult the Thermal and Fluid Sciences area advisor for other options.



PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Outstanding students with a GPA of at least 3.5 in their master’s program will be considered for admission to the program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in mechanical engineering.

PhD Course Requirements
At least 90.0 credits are required for the PhD degree. The master’s degree is not a prerequisite for the PhD, but does count as 45.0 credits toward the 90.0 credit requirement.

For students entering the PhD program with a prior MS degree:

  • 45.0 credits of graduate courses out of which 18.0 credits are graduate courses exclusive of independent study and dissertation. If the MS degree was not from Drexel's Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (MEM) Department, 12.0 of these 18.0 credits must be MEM graduate courses (600-level or above). The remaining 27.0 credits consist of a combination of dissertation, independent study, and additional advanced coursework consistent with the approved plan of study. 

For students entering the PhD program with a BS degree but without a prior master's degree:

  • 90.0 credits of graduate courses. 45.0 of these 90.0 credits must satisfy the MS in Mechanical Engineering degree requirements. The remaining 45.0 credits must satisfy the requirements above.

PhD Candidacy Examination
A graduate student in the PhD program needs be nominated by his/her supervising adviser to take the candidacy examination. A student who enters the PhD program with a prior MS degree must take the Candidacy Examination within the first year after entry to the PhD program. A student who enters the PhD program without a prior MS degree must take the Candidacy Examination within 2 years after entry to the PhD program.

The Candidacy Examination consists of two components: A course-component examination and a research-component examination. The student must demonstrate excellence in both components. The research-component examination consists of a written report and an oral presentation. The Candidacy Committee selects three or more research papers in the student’s declared research area for student to conduct a critical review. In three weeks the student submits a written report. One week after the written report is submitted the student makes an oral presentation. The presentation is followed by questions by the Committee. The goals of the questions: To evaluate the student’s knowledge in the scientific fields related to the research area, including related background and fundamental material, and the student’s ability to integrate information germane to success in research. Additional details are given in the Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Graduate Program Manual.

Thesis Proposal
At least one year prior to graduation, the PhD candidate must give a thesis proposal to the dissertation advisory committee. The student must submit a written proposal and make a presentation. The written proposal normally includes: abstract, introduction, detailed literature review, preliminary results, proposed research tasks and timetable. The committee will approve/reject the thesis topic, the scope of work and the general method of attack.

Thesis Defense
A final examination consisting of a presentation and defense of the research dissertation is required, before the PhD degree is granted. 

Further details can be obtained from the department's Graduate Programs Manual.

Facilities

A. J. Drexel Plasma Institute
The A. J. Drexel Plasma Institute (DPI) was formed in 2002 to stimulate and coordinate research projects related to plasma and other modern high energy engineering techniques. Today the DPI is an active multidisciplinary organization involving 23 faculty members from 6 engineering departments working in close collaboration with School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences and College of Nursing and Health Professions.

Advanced Design and Manufacturing Laboratory
This laboratory provides research opportunities in design methodology, computer-aided design, analysis and manufacturing, and materials processing and manufacturing. Facilities include various computers and software, I-DEAS, Pro/E,ANSYS, MasterCAM, Mechanical DeskTop, SurfCAM, Euclid, Strim, ABQUS, and more.The machines include two Sanders Model Maker rapid prototyping machines, a BridgePort CNC Machining Center, a BOY 220 injection molding machine, an Electra high-temperature furnace for metal sintering, infiltration, and other heat treatment.

Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory
The biofluid mechanics laboratory conducts computational and experimental research on the dynamics of flow in the cardiovascular and respiratory system, and the effects of flow on biological processes, particularly hemostasis and thrombosis. Lab resources include high-performance engineering workstations, commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and basic experimental facilities including Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), pressure and flow transducers, pumps, and microscopes.

Biological Systems Analysis Laboratory
The research in the Laboratory for Biological Systems Analysis involves the integration of biology with systems level engineering analysis and design, with an emphasis on: (1) the development of robotic systems that borrow from nature's designs and use novel technologies to achieve superior performance and function; and (2) the use of system identification techniques to evaluate the functional performance of animal physiological systems under natural, behavioral conditions. Facilities include rapid prototyping machines, compliant material manufacturing, mold making facilities, and a traditional machine shop and electronics workshop.

Biomechanics Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on understanding the mechanical properties of human joints, characterization of the mechanical properties of biological materials, studies of human movements, and design and development of artificial limbs. Facilities include a 3-D kinematic measuring system, Instron testing machine, and microcomputers for data acquisition and processing. Additional biomechanical laboratory facilities are available at Moss Rehab Hospital.

Combustion, Fuel Chemistry, and Emissions Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on developing an understanding of both the chemical and physical factors that control and, hence, can be used to tailor combustion processes for engineering applications. Facilities include two single cylinder research engines, a pressurized flow reactor (PFR) facility, flat flame and slot burner systems, and complete analytical and monitoring instrumentation. The engine systems are used to study the effects of operating variables, fuel type, ambient conditions, and control devices on engine performance and emissions. The PFR facility is used for detailed kinetic studies of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation processes.

Combustion Diagnostics Laboratory
High speed cameras, spectrometers, and laser systems are used to conduct research in (1) low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation, (2) cool flames, and (3) plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Research in optical diagnostic development is conducted in this lab with a specific focus on tools to measure small peroxy radicals.

Complex Fluids and Multiphase Transport Laboratory
The research focus of this lab lies at the interface of thermal-fluid sciences, nano materials, and colloid and surface sciences. We apply these fundamental sciences to advance energy conversion and storage systems, to provide effective thermal management solutions, and to enable scalable additive nanomanufacturing. Facilities include materials printing systems, fluorescence microscope and imaging systems, complex fluid characterization, microfluidics and heat transfer testers, coating and solar cell testing devices, electrochemical characterization, and high performance computing facilities. 

Composite Mechanics Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on the characterization of performance of composite materials. Current interest includes damage mechanisms, failure processes, and time-dependent behavior in resin-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites. Major equipment includes servo-hydraulic and electromechanical Instron testing machines, strain/displacement monitoring systems, environmental chambers, microcomputers for data acquisition and processing, composites fabrication facility, interferometric displacement gauge, X-radiography, and acoustic emission systems.

Dynamic Multifunctional Materials Laboratory (DMML)
The focus of DMML is mechanics of materials; namely fracture and failure mechanisms under extreme conditions and their correlation to meso- and microstructural characteristics. Utilizing highly integrated experimental facilities such as a Kolsky (split-Hopkinson pressure bar), single-stage, and two stage light-gas gun, complex material behavior is deconstructed into dominant time and length scales associated with the energetics of damage evolution. In-situ laser and optical diagnostics such as caustics, interferometry techniques, schlieren visualization and virtual grid method, are used to investigate coupled field properties of multifunctional materials with the goal of not only analyzing and understanding behavior, but ultimately tailoring material properties for specific applications.

Electrochemical Energy Systems Laboratory (ECSL)
The ECSL is specializes in the design, diagnostics and characterization of next generation electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. Current areas of research include flow-assisted supercapacitors, next generation flow battery technology and fuel cells for transportation, stationary and portable applications. ECSL utilizes a comprehensive approach, including: advanced diagnostics, system design, materials characterization, and computational modeling of electrochemical energy systems. The core mission of ECSL is to develop novel diagnostic and computational tools to understand critical issues in flow-assisted electrochemical systems and enable better system design. Due to the complex nature of these systems, our research is highly interdisciplinary and spans the interface of transport phenomena, materials characterization, electrochemistry and system engineering.

Microcomputer Controls Laboratory
This laboratory provides an environment conducive to appreciating aspects of systems and control through hands-on experiments. They range from data acquisition and processing to modeling of dynamical systems and implementing a variety of controllers to control systems, such as DC motors and the inverted pendulum. Facilities also include microcontrollers such as Basic Stamp and the Motorola 68HCI 1. Active research is being conducted on control reconfiguration in the event of actuator failures in aircrafts.

Non-Newtonion Fluid and Heat Transfer Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on the study of hydrodynamic and thermal performance of various non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluids in complex flow geometries. Facilities and equipment include a 20-foot-long recirculating flow loop with a 500-gallon reservoir tank and a thermal conductivity measurement cell. A complete data acquisition system provides fully automated experimental operation and data reduction. A state-of-the-art finite element code FIDAP running on a CDC 180 computer provides three-dimensional flow and heat transfer simulations of flows in complex geometrics, with a complete post-processing graphic capability backed by template.

Precision Instrumentation and Metrology Laboratory
This laboratory is focused on activities related to precision measurement, computer-aided inspection, and precision instrument design. Facilities include 3D Coordinate Measuring Machine (Brown & Sharpe) with Micro Measurement and Reverse engineering software, Surface Profilometer, and Laser Displacement Measuring System.

Rheology Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on developing tools for rheological property measurement of various non-Newtonian fluids, including friction-reducing viscoelastic fluids, molten polymers, coal-water slurries, ceramic slurries, and bonding cements for biomedical applications. A capillary tube viscometer, falling ball and needle viscometers, and Brookfield rotating viscometer are available. In particular, the capillary tube viscometer is designed to allow fully automated operation, thus avoiding time-consuming data collection procedures. A high-temperature and high-pressure capillary tube viscometer is under development, so that viscosities of advanced polymer materials can be measured at relatively high temperatures and shear rates.

Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)
The objective of SSL is ". . . to inspire future generations to advance aerospace engineering.' It provides research opportunities in orbital mechanics, rendezvous and docking maneuvers, mission planning, and space environment. The lab provides facilities for activities in High Altitude Balloons, construction of air-vehicles and nano-satellites, 0-g flights, and STK simulation package for satellite flights and trajectories.

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics Group (TAMG)
Research in the TAMG focuses on using experimental, analytical and computational tools to understand deformation and failure of materials, components and structures in a broad range of time and length scales. To accomplish this goal, TAMG develops procedures that include mechanical behavior characterization coupled with non-destructive testing and modern computational tools. This information is used both for understanding the role of important material scales in the observed bulk behavior and for the formulation of constitutive laws that can model the response including damage initiation and progression according to prescribed loading conditions. Equipment and facilities used by TAMG include a range of mechanical testing equipment for testing in tension, compression, fatigue and fracture as well as: a) two multichannel Acoustic Emission systems, b) a 5 Megapixel Digital Image Correlation system, c) a FLIR infrared thermography camera, and d) a 64-core High Performance Computational Cluster. TAMG has further developed procedures to use several pieces of equipment and facilities at Drexel University including the Machine Shop, Centralized Research Facilities and the University Research Computing Faci

Thermal Systems Laboratory
The thermal systems laboratory is outfitted with an array of instrumentation and equipment for conducting single- and multiphase heat transfer experiments in controlled environments. Facilities include computer-controlled data acquisition (LabVIEW ) systems, a Newport holographic interferometric system with associated lasers and optics, image enlargers, power amplifiers, precision voltmeters, slip-ring assemblies, and workstation for large-scale computing and simulation. A draft-free room is available with independent temperature control for carrying out natural convection experiments. An experimental test-rig is available for studying heat transfer from rotating surfaces. A bubble column has been recently built to study multiphase flow and heat transfer problems. Facilities are also available for measuring thermal conductivities of thin films using a thermal comparator.

Vascular Kinetics Laboratory (VKL)
The VKL uses engineering methods to understand how biomechanics and biochemistry interact in cardiovascular disease.  In particular, we study fluid flow and blood vessel stiffness impact cellular response to glucose, growth factors, and inflammation to lead to atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. We then apply these discoveries to novel biomaterials and therapies, with a particular focus on treating cardiovascular disease in under-served populations. This research is at the interface of engineering and medicine, with close collaborations with biologists and physicians and a strong emphasis on clinical applications.


Courses

MEM 503 Gas Turbines & Jet Propulsion 3.0 Credits

Covers fundamentals of thermodynamics and aerothermodynamics, and application to propulsion engines; thermodynamic cycles and performance analysis of gas turbines and air-breathing propulsion systems, turbojet, turboprop, ducted fan, ramjet, and ducted rocket; theory and design of ramjets, liquid and solid rockets, air-augmented rockets, and hybrid rockets; aerodynamics of flames, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of combustion reactions; supersonic combustion technology and zero-g propulsion problems; and propulsion systems comparison and evaluation for space missions.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 504 HVAC Equipment 3.0 Credits

Covers performance of air handlers, pumps, direct expansion systems, chillers, cooling towers, and similar equipment.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 505 HVAC Controls 3.0 Credits

Covers control theory and application to heating, ventilating, air conditioning, including pneumatic, fluidic, and electronic controls.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 517 Fundamentals of Nanomanufacturing 3.0 Credits

This course introduces conventional methods that emerged from microelectronics and nonconventional or alternative approaches as applied to fabricate nanometer-scale biological and solid-state devices; Preliminary concepts for nanofabrication; Conventional lithographic methods; Nonconventional methods such as nanoimprint lithography and chemical and biological approaches; Cell culturing for application in biology; The safe development and use of advanced nanotechnological manufacturing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: (MEM 417 [Min Grade: C] and ENGR 201 [Min Grade: C] and ENGR 202 [Min Grade: C]) or PHYS 201 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 518 Introduction to Nanoscale Metrology 3.0 Credits

Highlights the most innovative and powerful developments in nano/microscale diagnostics; Reviews conventional and non-conventional micro- and nanofabrication, preliminary concepts for nanoscale metrology; Covers optical diagnostics for microfluidics and nanofluidics, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, ionic current blockage measurement, mass spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy, and laser induced fluorescence.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 530 Aircraft Flight Dynamics & Control I 3.0 Credits

Covers development of dynamic models, linearization, aerodynamic coefficients, control derivatives, longitudinal and lateral modes, and open-loop analysis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 540 Control Applications of DSP Microprocessors 3.0 Credits

Most of the control systems today are digital and implemented using microprocessors. In this course, the students will learn how to employ the state-of-the-art DSP microprocessors to perform analog-to-digital conversion, digital-to-analog conversion, digital signal processing, decision making, and feedback control action to achieve precise regulation/ tracking, disturbance reduction, and robust stability/performance for physical systems. In addition to lectures by the instructor, the course will feature eight hands-on lab projects centered on the design and microprocessor implementation of digital controllers for MIMO (multi-input-multi-output) electro-mechanical systems. Cross-listed with undergraduate course MEM 459.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 545 Solar Energy Fundamentals 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on basic theories of solar radiation, solar thermal energy, and photovoltaics. Students will learn basic radiation heat transfer, solar radiation, solar thermal collection and storage, passive and active solar heating/cooling, physics of photovoltaic cells, and characteristics and types of solar cells.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 345 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 201 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 569 Introduction to Composite Materials I 3.0 Credits

Introduces anisotropic elasticity, lamina stiffness and compliance, plane-stress and plane-strain, stress-strain relations of a lamina, testing methods, engineering elastic constants, failure criteria, and micromechanics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 570 Introduction to Composite Materials II 3.0 Credits

Covers laminated plate theory, stiffness and compliance of laminated plates, effect of laminate configuration on elastic performance, and review of research topics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 569 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 571 Introduction to Robot Technology 3.0 Credits

Covers robot configuration; components, actuators, and sensors; vision; and control, performance, and programming. Includes lectures and laboratory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 572 Mechanics of Robot Manipulators 3.0 Credits

Covers homogeneous transformation, direct and inverse kinematic manipulators, velocities and acceleration, static forces, and manipulators' dynamics, via Lagrange and Newton-Euler formulations. Includes lectures and laboratory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 666 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 573 Industrial Application of Robots 3.0 Credits

Covers path planning and workspace determination, robot accuracy and repeatability measurements, robot call design, application engineering and manufacturing, material transfer, processing operations, and assembly and inspection. Includes lectures and laboratory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 574 Introduction to CAM 3.0 Credits

Examines the basic elements used to integrate design and manufacturing processes, including robotics, computerized-numerical controlled machines, and CAD/CAM systems. Covers manufacturability considerations when integrating unit process elements.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 591 Applied Engr Analy Methods I 3.0 Credits

Covers effective methods to analyze engineering problems. This module focuses on analytical and computational methods for problems tractable with vectors, tensors and linear algebra. Uses symbolic/numerical computational software. Examples drawn from thermal fluid sciences, mechanics and structures, systems and control, and emerging technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 592 Applied Engr Analy Methods II 3.0 Credits

Covers effective methods to analyze engineering problems. This module focuses on computational and analytical methods for complex variables and ordinary differential equations. Uses symbolic/numerical computational software. Examples drawn from thermal fluid sciences, mechanics and structures, systems and control, and emerging technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 591 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 593 Applied Engr Analy Methods III 3.0 Credits

Covers effective methods to computationally and analytically solve engineering problems. This module focuses on solution methods for partial differential equations, Fourier analysis, finite element analysis and probabilistic analysis. Uses symbolic/numerical computational software. Examples drawn from mechanical and civil engineering.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 592 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 601 Statistical Thermodynamics I 3.0 Credits

Covers probability theory; statistical interpretation of the laws of thermodynamics; systems of independent particles; systems of dependent particles; kinetic theory of dilute gases; quantum mechanics; energy storage and degrees of freedom; and thermochemical properties of monatomic, diatomic, and polyatomic gases.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 602 Statistical Thermodynamics II 3.0 Credits

Covers analysis of monatomic solids, theory of liquids, chemical equilibrium, kinetic and thermochemical description of rate processes, transport phenomena, and spectroscopy.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 601 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 603 Advanced Thermodynamics 3.0 Credits

Covers reformulation of empirical thermodynamics in terms of basic postulates; presentation of the geometrical, mathematical interpretation of thermodynamics; Legendre transforms; requirements for chemical and phase equilibrium; first-and second-order phase transitions; Onsager reciprocal relations; and irreversible thermodynamics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 611 Conduction Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Covers conduction of heat through solid, liquid, and gaseous media; advanced analytical methods of analysis, including integral transform and Green's functions, the use of sources and sinks, and numerical and experimental analogy methods; and variational techniques.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 612 Convection Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Covers convective heat transfer without change of phase or constitution, fundamental equations, exact solutions, application of the principle of similarity and the boundary-layer concept to convective heat transfer, similarity between heat and momentum transfer, and heat transfer in high-velocity flows.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 613 Radiation Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Covers radiation heat transfer between surfaces and within materials that absorb and emit. Formulates and applies methods of analysis to problems involving radiation alone and radiation combined with conduction and convection.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 617 Introduction to Microfabrication 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the fundamentals of microfabrication technologies. The materials, principles, and applications of silicon-based microfabrication technologies such as photolithography, wet/dry etching, deposition techniques, surface micromachining, and polymer micromachining will be covered. This course also includes two lab sessions through which students will have a hands-on experience in microfabrication.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 619 Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip 3.0 Credits

The course explores applications of microfluidic phenomena and lab-on-a-chip technology. The topics include fluid behavior in microchannels, electrokinetic manipulation, micro-scale separation/surface sciences, transducer effects, and microactuators. Students will also have a hands-on experience through laboratory sessions.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 417 [Min Grade: C] or MEM 617 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 621 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics 3.0 Credits

Covers kinematics and dynamics of fluid motion; Lagrangian and Eulerian description of motion; transport theorem; continuity and momentum equations (Navier-Stokes equations); vorticity vector and equation; three-dimensional, axisymmetric, and two-dimensional complex potential flows; constitutive equations of a viscous fluid; dynamic similarity; Stokes flow; and similarity analysis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 622 Boundry Layers-Laminar & Turbulent 3.0 Credits

Covers laminar boundary layers; approximate integral method; three-dimensional laminar boundary layer and boundary-layer control; transient boundary-layer flows; the integral momentum equation; origins of turbulence; transition to turbulent flow; Reynolds-averaged equations; Reynolds stress; measurement of turbulent quantities; study of turbulent wall bounded flows, including pipe flow, flow over a flat plate, and flow over a rotating disk; and boundary layer in a pressure gradient.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 621 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 630 Linear Multivariable Systems I 3.0 Credits

State space representation, continuous time and discrete time systems, similarity transformation, invariant subspaces, state response, stability, controllability, observability, Kalman decomposition, spectral and singular value decompositions.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 631 Linear Multivariable Systems II 3.0 Credits

Pole assignment, output feedback, linear quadratic regulator, observer design, stochastic processes, state response to white noise, Kalman filter, linear quadratic Gaussian controller, evaluation of closed loop system.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 632 Linear Multivariable Systems III 3.0 Credits

Model reduction: approximation of transfer functions, modal truncations, oblique projections, component cost analysis, internal balancing; controller reduction: observer-based controller parametrization, Riccati balancing, q-COVER theory, optimal projections.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 633 Robust Control Systems I 3.0 Credits

Covers linear spaces and linear operators; Banach and Hilbert spaces; time-domain spaces; frequency-domain spaces; singular value decomposition; EISPACK, LINPACK, and MATLAB, including internal stability; coprime factorization over the ring of polynomial matrices; matrix fraction description; properties of polynomial matrices; irreducible mfds; Smith-McMillan form; poles and zeros; canonical realizations; and computation of minimal realizations.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 634 Robust Control Systems II 3.0 Credits

Covers the structure of stabilizing controllers; coprime factorization over the ring of proper stable rational matrices; algebraic Riccati equation; state space computation of coprime factorization; yvb controller parametrization; linear fractional transformation; state space structure of proper stabilizing controllers; formulation of control problem, H, and H optimization problem; model matching problem; tracking problem; robust stabilization problem; inner-outer factorization; and Sarason's H interpolation theory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 633 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 635 Robust Control Systems III 3.0 Credits

Covers Hankel-norm approximations, balanced realizations, two-block H optimization, generalized multivariable stability margins, structured and non-structured stability margins, structured singular values, robust stabilization and performance, and recent developments in robust control.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 634 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 636 Theory of Nonlinear Control I 3.0 Credits

Provides a comprehensive introduction to the geometric theory of non-linear dynamical systems and feedback control. Includes stability, controllability, and observability of non-linear systems; exact linearization, decoupling, and stabilization by smooth feedback; and zero dynamics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 637 Theory of Nonlinear Control II 3.0 Credits

Covers systems with parameters, including bifurcation and stability; static bifurcation; local regulation of parameter-dependent non-linear dynamics; tracking; limit cycles in feedback systems; perturbation methods; frequency domain analysis; and applications.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 636 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 638 Theory of Nonlinear Control III 3.0 Credits

Covers high gain and discontinuous feedback systems, including sliding modes, applications, and advanced topics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 637 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 639 Real Time Microcomputer Control I 3.0 Credits

Covers discrete-time systems and the Z-transform, sampling and data reconstruction, the pulse transfer function, discrete state equations, time-domain analysis, digital simulation, stability, frequency-domain analysis, Labview programming, and data acquisition and processing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 640 Real Time Microcomputer Control II 3.0 Credits

Covers design of discrete-time controllers, sampled data transformation of analog filter, digital filters, microcomputer implementation of digital filters, Labview programming techniques, using the daq library, writing a data acquisition program, and Labview implementation of pid controllers.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 639 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 646 Fundamentals of Plasmas I 3.0 Credits

Introduces the fundamentals of plasma science and modern industrial plasma applications in electronics, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include quasi-equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, statistics, fluid dynamics and kinetics of plasma and other modern high temperature and high energy systems and processes.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 647 Fundamentals of Plasmas II 3.0 Credits

Continues the development of the engineering fundamentals of plasma discharges applied in modern industrial plasma applications in electronics, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include quasi-equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, statistics, fluid dynamics of major thermal and non-thermal plasma discharges, operating at low, moderate and atmospheric pressures.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 646 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 648 Applications of Thermal Plasmas 3.0 Credits

Introduces applications of modern thermal plasma processes focused on synthesis of new materials, material treatment, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include: thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of high temperature plasma processes, engineering organization of specific modern thermal plasma technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 649 Application of Non-Thermal Plasmas 3.0 Credits

Application of modern non-thermal plasma processes focused on synthesis of new materials, material treatment, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include: non-equilibrium thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of cold temperature plasma processes, engineering organization of specific modern non-thermal plasma technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 660 Theory of Elasticity I 3.0 Credits

Summarizes mechanics of materials courses. Covers vector and tensor analysis, indicial notation, theory of stress, equilibrium equations, displacements and small strains, compatibility, and strain energy; formulation of the governing equations and the appropriate boundary conditions in linear elasticity, and uniqueness of the solutions; elementary three-dimensional examples and two-dimensional theory; stress functions; solutions in Cartesian and polar coordinates; and Fourier series.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 661 Theory of Elasticity II 3.0 Credits

Covers two-dimensional problems by the method of Muskhelishvili, torsion problem, stress function and solutions by means of complex variables and conformal mapping, three-dimensional solutions for straight beams, energy theorems, virtual work and their applications, and Rayleigh-Ritz method.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 660 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 662 Theory of Elasticity III 3.0 Credits

Covers use of Fourier series and Green's functions for plane problems; three-dimensional problems in terms of displacement potentials; use of the Galerkin vector and the Boussinesq-Papkovitch-Neuber functions; fundamental solutions to the Kelvin, Boussinesq, Cerruti, and Mindlin problems; and elastic contact. Introduces non-linear elasticity.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 661 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 663 Continuum Mechanics 3.0 Credits

Covers kinematics, Eulerian, and Lagrangian formulations of deformation; theory of stress; balance principles; continuum thermodynamics; and constitutive relations in fluids and solids.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 664 Introduction to Plasticity 3.0 Credits

Reviews stress and strain deviators, invariants and distortional energy, principal and octahedral stresses and strains, Tresca and von Mises yield criteria, yield surface and Haigh-Westergaard stress space, Lode's stress parameter, subsequent yield surface, Prandtl-Reuss relations, work hardening and strain hardening, stress-strain relations from Tresca criteria, incremental and deformation theories, the slip-line field, slip-line equations for stress, velocity equations and geometry of slip-line field, limit analysis, simple truss, bending of beams, lower and upper bound theorems, and plasticity equations in finite-element methods.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 660 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 665 Time-Dependent Solid Mechanics 3.0 Credits

Part a: Covers elastodynamics, including plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves; characteristics; the acoustic tensor; polarizations and wave speeds; transmission and reflection at plane interfaces; critical angles and surface waves; and waveguides and dispersion relationships. Part b: Covers linear viscoelasticity, including relaxation modulus and creep compliance, hereditary integrals, Laplace transform, correspondence principle, creep buckling and vibrations, viscoplasticity, creep, strain-rate effects, shear bands, and shock waves.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 660 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 666 Advanced Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Covers analytical statics (principle of virtual work), Lagrange's equations, conservation laws, stability analysis by perturbation about steady state, Jacobi first integral, ignoration of coordinates, classification of constraints, solution of constrained dynamical problems by constraint embedding (elimination) or constraint adjoining (Lagrange multipliers), generalized impulse and momentum, and formulation and solution of non-holonomic systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 667 Advanced Dynamics II 3.0 Credits

Covers vector dynamics in three dimensions, including a detailed study of rotational kinematics, motion of the mass center and about the mass center for a system of particles and a rigid body, moments of inertia, three-dimensional dynamical problems, and comparison between Lagrangian techniques and the vector methods of Euler and Newton. Includes vibrations, Euler's angles, motion of a gyroscope, and motion of an axially symmetric body under no force other than its weight.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 666 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 668 Advanced Dynamics III 3.0 Credits

Covers central forces, effect of the earth's rotation, Foucault's pendulum, variational methods, Hamilton's principle, state space techniques for the integration of equations of motion, and numerical integration of equations of motion on microcomputers through the CSMP program. Depending on student interest, includes either Hamiltonian dynamics (canonical equations, contact transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory) or rigid body kinematics of complex dynamical systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 667 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 670 Theory of Plates and Shells 3.0 Credits

Covers elements of the classical plate theory, including analysis of circular and rectangular plates, combined lateral and direct loads, higher-order plate theories, the effects of transverse shear deformations, and rotatory inertia; matrix formulation in the derivation of general equations for shells; and membrane and bending theories for shells of revolution.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 671 Mechanical Vibrations I 3.0 Credits

Free and forced responses of single degree of freedom linear systems; two degree of freedom systems; multiple degree of freedom systems; the eigenvalue problem; modal analysis; continuous systems; exact solutions; elements of analytical dynamics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 672 Mechanical Vibrations II 3.0 Credits

Continuous systems; approximate solutions; the finite element method; nonlinear systems; geometric theory, perturbation methods; random vibrations; computational techniques.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 673 Ultrasonics I 3.0 Credits

Basic elements of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, wave analysis, transducers, transform techniques, A,B,C,M,F and Doppler imaging, medical imaging, multiple element arrays, real-time imaging, calibration.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 674 Ultrasonics II 3.0 Credits

Basic elements of guided wave analysis, oblique incidence reflection factor, critical angle reflectivity, surface waves, lamb waves, plate waves, dispersion, phase and group velocity, experimental techniques for guided waves.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 675 Medical Robotics I 3.0 Credits

Use of robots in surgery, safety considerations, understanding robot kinematics, analysis of surgeon performance using a robotic devices, inverse kinematics, velocity analysis, acceleration analysis, various types of surgeries case study.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 676 Medical Robotics II 3.0 Credits

Force and movement for robot arms, robot dynamics, computer vision, vision based control, combining haptics, vision and robot dynamics in a cohesive framework for the development of a medical robotic system.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 675 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 677 Haptics for Medical Robotics 3.0 Credits

Introduction to haptics, physiology of touch, actuators, sensors, non-portable force feedback, portable voice feedback, tactile feedback interfaces, haptic sensing and control.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 678 Nondestructive Evaluation Methods 3.0 Credits

This course covers the tools necessary for the inspection and evaluation of materials and infrastructures. Most relevant methods used for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of structural components will be discussed. Physical principles of continuum mechanics, electrical engineering, acoustics and elastic wave propagation underlying the NDE methods will be covered. Sensor data acquisition and digital signal processing will be addressed.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 681 Finite Element Methods I 3.0 Credits

Covers formulation of finite element methods for linear analysis of static and dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and field problems; displacement-based, hybrid, and stress-based methods; variational and weighted residual approaches; effective computational procedures for solution of finite element equations in static and dynamics analyses; and pre-processing and post-processing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 682 Finite Element Methods II 3.0 Credits

Covers formulation of advanced finite element methods for non-linear analysis of static and dynamic problems in solids, structures, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and field problems; material non-linearity; large displacement; large rotation; large strain; effective solution procedures for non-linear finite element equations in static and dynamic analyses; and effective finite element methods for eigenvalue problems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 681 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 684 Mechanics of Biological Tissues 3.0 Credits

Covers composition and structure of tendons, ligaments, skin, and bone; bone mechanics and its application in orthopedics; viscoelasticity of soft biological tissues; models of soft biological tissues; mechanics of skeletal muscle; and muscle models and their applications.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 685 Mechanics of Human Joints 3.0 Credits

Covers the structure of human joints, including experimental and analytical techniques in the study of human joint kinematics; applications to the design of artificial joints and to clinical diagnosis and treatments; stiffness characteristics of joints and their applications to joint injuries; and prosthetic design and graft replacements.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 686 Mechanics of Human Motion 3.0 Credits

Examines experimental and analytical techniques in human motion analysis and human locomotion; interdeterminacy of muscle force distribution in human motion; modeling and simulation of bipedal locomotion; energetics, stability, control, and coordination of human motion; and pathological gait.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 687 Manufacturing Processes I 3.0 Credits

Introduces basic manufacturing process technology and the mechanical properties of metals and plastics. Covers dimensional and geometry tolerancing; surface finishing; material removal processes and machine tools; processing of polymers and reinforced plastics, including general properties of plastic materials and forming, shaping, and processing of plastics; and CNC machining and programming. Combines lectures and laboratory work.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 688 Manufacturing Processes II 3.0 Credits

Covers processing of polymers and reinforced plastics, including general properties of plastic materials and forming, shaping, and processing of plastics; CNC machining and programming; casting processes; sheet-metal forming processes; bulk deformation processes; and computer integrated manufacturing systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 687 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 689 Computer-Aided Manufacturing 3.0 Credits

Covers development of software and hardware for computer-aided manufacturing systems, basic elements used to integrate the manufacturing processes, and manufacturability studies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 699 Independent Study and Research 0.5-9.0 Credits

Offers independent study and research in mechanical engineering.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MEM 701 Physical Gas Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Reviews equilibrium kinetic theory of dilute gases. Covers non-equilibrium flows of reacting mixtures of gases, flows of dissociating gases in thermodynamics equilibrium, flow with vibrational or chemical non-equilibrium, non-equilibrium kinetic theory, flow with translational non-equilibrium, and equilibrium/non-equilibrium radiation.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 602 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 705 Combustion Theory I 3.0 Credits

Covers thermochemistry, including the relationship between heats of formation and bond energies, heat capacities and heats of reaction, chemical equilibrium and the equilibrium constant, calculation of adiabatic flame temperature and composition of burned gas, free energy and phase equilibrium, classical chemical kinetics, and chain reaction theory.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 706 Combustion Theory II 3.0 Credits

Covers laminar flame propagation in premixed gases, detonation and deflagration, heterogeneous chemical reactions, burning of liquid and solid fuels, and diffusion flames.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 705 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 707 Combustion Theory III 3.0 Credits

Covers advanced topics in combustion, including combustion-generated air pollution, incineration of hazardous wastes, supersonic combustion, propellants and explosives, and fires.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 706 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 711 Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer I 3.0 Credits

Covers classification of fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena, including time-dependent multidimensional heat conduction and finite-difference and finite-element formulations; convection and diffusion; upwind, exponential, and hybrid schemes; and boundary-layer-type fluid flow and heat transfer problems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 712 Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer II 3.0 Credits

Covers basic computational methods for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, including vorticity-based methods and primitive variable formulation; computational methods for compressible flows; inviscid and viscous compressible flows; finite-element methods applied to incompressible flows; and turbulent flow models and calculations.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 711 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 714 Two-Phase Flow & Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Covers selected topics in two-phase flow, with emphasis on two-phase heat transfer problems, basic conservation equations for two-phase flows, nucleation, bubble dynamics, pool boiling, forced convective boiling, condensation heat transfer, two-phase flow equipment design, tube vibration and flow instability in two-phase flows, and fouling in heat transfer equipment.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 717 Heat Transfer in Manufacturing 3.0 Credits

Covers heat conduction fundamentals, including phase change problems (casting, welding, and rapid solidification processes) and cooling controls of rolling, forging, and extrusion processes.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 611 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 721 Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 3.0 Credits

Covers the stress-strain rate relationship, simple flow, general constitutive and conservation equations, generalized Newtonian models, molecular theories, rheological property measurements, plane Couette flow, hydrodynamic theory of lubrication, helical flow, boundary layer flows, pipe flows, natural convection, thin film analysis, drag reduction phenomenon, and biorheology.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 622 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 722 Hydrodynamic Stability 3.0 Credits

Introduces stability, including discrete and continuous systems. Covers linear theory; instability of shear flows, spiral flows between concentric cylinders and spheres, thermoconductive systems, and viscous flows; global stability and non-linear theories; and time periodic and non-periodic flows, attractors, and bifurcation.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 622 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 723 Vortex Interactions and Complex Turbulent Flow 3.0 Credits

Nonlinear vertex motion and interaction; motion of point vortices; generation and interaction of vortex rings and counter-rotating vortex pairs; vortex impulse, energy, pairing, bifurcation, and bursting; study of free and separating turbulent flows: mixing layers, wakes, jets, and buoyant plumes; recirculation behind bluff bodies and backsteps; longitudinal and lateral vortex waves and shear layers; sweeps and bursts in turbulent boundary layers; characteristics of turbulence: entrainment and molecular mixing, effects of buoyancy, rotation, acceleration, and heat release; the 3-D turbulent energy cascade and the 2-D inverse cascade.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 725 Compressible Fluid Dynamics 3.0 Credits

Reviews one-dimensional flows. Covers steady flow of a compressible fluid; two-and three-dimensional subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow; normal and oblique shock waves; wave reflections; oblique shock wave interactions and generation vorticity; compressible boundary layers; and shock boundary-layer interactions.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 621 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 727 Fluid Dynamics in Manufacturing Processes 3.0 Credits

Covers transport of slurries, molten metals, and polymers; hydrodynamics in forming processes; resin flow model in polymer composites; shaped charge jet technology; separation and filtration; coating; lubrication; and melt-spinning process.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 730 Control of Flexible Space Structures I 3.0 Credits

Covers modeling of FSS including PDE description and finite element modeling, model errors, model reduction, component cost analysis, modal cost analysis, stability of mechanical systems, gyroscopic and non-gyroscopic systems, and rate and position feedback.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 731 Control of Flexible Space Structures II 3.0 Credits

Covers probability theory, stochastic processes, Kalman filter, LQG compensators, controller reduction, CCA theory, balancing reductions, and applications.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 730 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 733 Applied Optimal Control I 3.0 Credits

Covers necessary conditions from calculus of variations, equality and inequality constraints, fixed and free final time problems, linear-quadratic control, bang-bang control, and application to problems in flight mechanics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 734 Applied Optimal Control II 3.0 Credits

Covers neighboring extremals and the second variation, perturbation feedback control, sufficient conditions, numerical solution methods, and application to problems in flight mechanics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 733 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 735 Advanced Topics in Optimal Control 3.0 Credits

Covers singular arc control, model following control, variable structure control, singular perturbation methods, differential games, and applications.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 734 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 760 Mechanical Composite Materials I 3.0 Credits

Covers anisotropic elastic moduli, stress-strain relations of a lamina, failure criteria of a lamina, introduction to micromechanics, laminated plate theory, residual stresses, and strength of laminates.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 660 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 761 Mechanical Composite Materials II 3.0 Credits

Covers anisotropic plates and shells, boundary value problem in anisotropic heterogeneous elasticity, vibrations and buckling of laminated plates, and testing methods.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 760 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 762 Mechanical Composite Materials III 3.0 Credits

Covers classical failure criteria for orthotropic materials, fracture in laminates, three-dimensional stress analysis, simulation of delamination and transverse cracks, fatigue damage, and cumulative damage models.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 761 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 770 Theory of Elastic Stability 3.0 Credits

General stability criteria; beam column; the elastica; energy methods; torsional stability; combined torsion and flexure; lateral buckling of beams in pure bending; buckling of rings; curved bars and arches.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 777 Fracture Mechanics I 3.0 Credits

Covers fundamental mechanics of fracture, including linear elastic crack mechanics, energetics, small-scale yielding, fully plastic crack mechanics, creep crack mechanics, fracture criteria, mixed mode fracture, stable quasi-static crack growth (fatigue crack growth and environmentally induced crack growth), toughness and toughening, and computational fracture mechanics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 782 Impact and Wave Propagation I 3.0 Credits

Governing equations for elastic waves; longitudinal waves in a bar; transverse in a flexible string; flexural waves in a Bernoulli-Euler beam; flexural waves in a Timoshenko beam; Rayleigh surface waves; Pochhammer-Chree waves in circular cylinders; reflection of plane waves at a plane boundary.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 783 Impact and Wave Propagation II 3.0 Credits

Spherical and cylindrical waves in unbounded medium; method of Laplace transform; method of characteristics; flexural waves in a Timoshenko plate; viscoelastic and viscoplastic waves; dispersion and phase velocity; natural frequency in free vibration.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 784 Impact & Wave Propagation III 3.0 Credits

Governing equations for unsteady, nonisentropic fluid flows; shock waves; method of characteristics for nonlinear system; numerical integration along characteristics; impact and vibration of shell topics in wave propagation.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 800 Special Topics Mechanical Engineering 0.5-9.0 Credits

Covers topics of current interest to faculty and students; specific topics for each term will be announced prior to registration. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MEM 891 Topics in Advanced Engineering I 2.0 Credits

Linear systems; control theory; vibrations and eigenvalue problems; systems dynamics; Fourier transformation; flight dynamics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 892 Topics in Advanced Engineering II 2.0 Credits

Separation of variables; thermodynamics; heat transfer; fluid mechanics; boundary layer theory; elasticity; finite element methods. Solid mechanics; aeroelasticity.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 893 Topics in Advanced Engineering III 2.0 Credits

Basic probability and statistics; communication theory; sampled data system; digital and optical processing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 894 Engineering Mathematics 3.0 Credits

Application of matrices, linear algebra, and complex analysis to engineering problems. Ordinary and partial differential equations.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MEM 897 Research 1.0-12.0 Credit

Supervised research in Mechanical Engineering.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MEM 898 Master's Thesis 1.0-20.0 Credit

Master's thesis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MEM 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-12.0 Credit

Ph.D. dissertation.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Faculty

Jonathan Awerbuch, DSc (Technion, Israel Institute of Technology). Professor. Mechanics of composites; fracture and fatigue; impact and wave propagation; structural dynamics.
Philipp Boettcher, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Assistant Teaching Professor. Thermal and hot surface ignition of hydrocarbons; high speed flow diagnostics; absorption and emission spectroscopy.
Nicholas P. Cernansky, PhD (University of California-Berkeley) Hess Chair Professor of Combustion. Professor. Combustion chemistry and kinetics; combustion generated pollution; utilization of alternative and synthetic fuels.
Bor-Chin Chang, PhD (Rice University). Professor. Computer-aided design of multivariable control systems; robust and optimal control systems.
Young I. Cho, PhD (University of Illinois-Chicago). Professor. Heat transfer; fluid mechanics; non-Newtonian flows; biofluid mechanics; rheology.
Alisa Clyne, PhD (Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Cardiovascular biomechanics.
Bakhtier Farouk, PhD (University of Delaware) Billings Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Heat transfer; combustion; numerical methods; turbulence modeling; materials processing.
Alexander Fridman, DSc, PhD (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, John A. Nyheim Endowed University Chair Professor, Director of the Drexel Plasma Institute. Professor. Plasma science and technology; pollutant mitigation; super-adiabatic combustion; nanotechnology and manufacturing.
Ani Hsieh, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Professor. Multi-robot systems, decentralized and distributed control, bio-inspired control, swarm robotics.
Andrei Jablokow, PhD (University of Wisconsin; Madison). Associate Teaching Professor. Computational kinematics; geometric modeling.
Suhada Jayasuriya, PhD (Wayne State University) Department Head, Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Distinguished Professor. Multi-agent systems; machine diagnostics in turbomachinery; human-machine interaction; structural health monitoring; alternative energy systems; gait studies in biomechanics.
Antonios Kontsos, PhD (Rice University). Assistant Professor. Applied mechanics; probabilistic engineering mechanics; modeling of smart multifunctional materials.
Emin Caglan Kumbur, PhD (Pennsylvania State University). Assistant Professor. Next generation energy technologies; fuel cell design and development.
Harry G. Kwatny, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) S. Herbert Raynes Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Dynamic systems analysis; stochastic optimal control; control of electric power plants and systems.
John Lacontora, PhD (New Jersey Institute of Technology). Associate Research Professor. Service engineering; industrial engineering.
Leslie Lamberson, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Dynamic behavior of materials, dynamic fracture, damage micromechanics, active materials.
Alan Lau, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Associate Department Head for Graduate Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Professor. Deformation and fracture of nano-devices and macroscopic structures; damage-tolerant structures and microstructures.
Matthew McCarthy, PhD (Columbia University). Assistant Professor. Micro- and nanoscale thermofluidic systems, bio-inspired cooling, smart materials and structures for self-regulated two-phase cooling, novel architectures for integrated energy conversion and storage.
David L. Miller, PhD (Louisiana State University). Professor. Gas-phase reaction kinetics; thermodynamics; biofuels.
Alexander Moseson, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Sustainability; engineering design; humanitarian (appropriate) technology; international development; service learning
Hongseok Noh, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. MEMS; BioMEMS; lab-on-a-chip; microfabrication; microfluidics.
Paul Y. Oh, PhD (Columbia University) Associate Department Head for External Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Professor. Smart sensors servomechanisms; machine vision and embedded microcomputers for robotics and mechatronics.
Sorin Siegler, PhD (Drexel University). Professor. Orthopedic biomechanics; robotics; dynamics and control of human motion; applied mechanics.
Wei Sun, PhD (Drexel University) Albert Soffa Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Computer-aided tissue engineering; solid freeform fabrication; CAD/CAM; design and modeling of nanodevices.
Ying Sun, PhD (University of Iowa). Associate Professor. Transport processes in multi-component systems with fluid flow; heat and mass transfer; phase change; pattern formation.
Tein-Min Tan, PhD (Purdue University) Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Associate Professor. Mechanics of composites; computational mechanics and finite-elements methods; structural dynamics.
James Tangorra, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Associate Department Head for Finance and Administration, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Associate Professor. Analysis of human and (other) animal physiological systems; head-neck dynamics and control; balance, vision, and the vestibular system; animal swimming and flight; robotics; system identification; bio-inspired design.
Christopher Weinberger, PhD (Stanford University). Assistant Professor. Multiscale materials modeling of mechanical properties including DFT, atomistics, mesoscale and microscale FEM modeling.
Ajmal Yousuff, PhD (Purdue University). Associate Professor. Optimal control; flexible structures; model and control simplifications.
Jack G. Zhou, PhD (New Jersey Institute of Technology). Professor. CAD/CAM; computer integrated manufacturing systems; rapid prototyping; system dynamics and automatic control.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Richard Chiou, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Green manufacturing, mechatronics, Internet-based robotics and automation, and remote sensors and monitoring.
Yalcin Ertekin, PhD (University of Missouri-Rolla). Associate Clinical Professor. High speed machining with micromachining applications, machining process optimization and condition monitoring using multiple sensors, FEA simulation with 3D solid modeling applications, rapid prototyping and reverse engineering, quality and reliability improvement with DOE, neural networks, data mining and Taguchi methods, CNC machine tool calibration, non-invasive surgical tool design, student learning enhancement using online simulation tools.
Michael Glaser, MFA (Ohio State University) Program Director for Product Design. Assistant Professor. Quantifying the designer's intuition; the interplay between digital and physical forms; human desire to shape our surroundings.
Yury Gogotsi, PhD (Kiev Polytechnic Institute) Director, A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute. Distinguished University & Trustee Chair Professor. Nanomaterials; carbon nanotubes; nanodiamond; graphene; MXene; materials for energy storage, supercapacitors, and batteries.
Y. Grace Hsuan, PhD (Imperial College). Professor. Polymeric and cementitioius materials; geosynthetic reliability and durability.
Michele Marcolongo, PhD, PE (University of Pennsylvania) Senior Associate Vice Provost for Translational Research. Professor. Orthopedic biomaterials; acellular regenerative medicine, biomimetic proteoglycans; hydrogels.
Michel Miller, PhD (University of Miami, Florida). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Special education.
Mira S. Olson, PhD (University of Virginia). Associate Professor. Groundwater; environmental fluid mechanics; hydrology.
William C. Regli, PhD (University of Maryland-College Park). Professor. Artificial intelligence; computer graphics; engineering design and Internet computing.
Jonathan E. Spanier, PhD (Columbia University). Associate Professor. Electronic, ferroic and plasmonic nanostructures and thin-film materials and interfaces; scanning probe microscopy; laser spectroscopy, including Raman scattering.

Emeritus Faculty

Leon Y. Bahar, PhD (Lehigh University). Professor Emeritus. Analytical methods in engineering, coupled thermoelasticity, interaction between analytical dynamics and control systems.
Pei C. Chou, ScD (Aeronautical Engineering from New York University) Billings Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering. Professor Emeritus. Material response due to impulsive loading, wave propagation in isotropic and composite materials, manufacturing technology.
Gordon D. Moskowitz, PhD (Princeton University). Professor Emeritus. Biomechanics, dynamics, design, applied mathematics.
Donald H. Thomas, PhD (Case Institute of Technology). Professor Emeritus. Biocontrol theory, biomechanics, fluidics and fluid control, vehicle dynamics, engineering design.
Albert S. Wang, PhD (University of Delaware) Albert and Harriet Soffa Professor. Professor Emeritus. Treatment of damage evolution processes in multi-phased high-temperature materials, including ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites.
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