Biomedical Engineering

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering (MSBE): 45.0 quarter credits
Doctor of Philosophy: 90.0 quarter credits

About the Program

Biomedical engineering applies engineering and science methodologies to the analysis of biological and physiological problems and to the delivery of health care. The biomedical engineer requires the analytical tools and broad physical knowledge of modern engineering and science, fundamental understanding of the biological or physiological system, and familiarity with recent technological breakthroughs.

The biomedical engineer serves as an interface between traditional engineering disciplines and living systems and may work in either direction, applying the patterns of living organisms to engineering design or engineering new approaches to human health. The biomedical engineer may use his/her knowledge of physiological systems to reverse engineer nature, creating, for example, artificial tissues and neural networks. On the other hand, a biomedical engineer may use his/her knowledge of engineering to create new equipment or environments for such purposes as maximizing human performance, accelerating wound healing, or providing non-invasive diagnostic tools.

The master's program in biomedical engineering emphasizes engineering design and scientific analysis. The curriculum develops graduates who can solve problems in the fields of chemical, environmental, biochemical, and materials process engineering, using their knowledge of modern theories, engineering systems, and mathematical and engineering tools. 

Superior students with training in engineering, natural science, or physical science will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Master students can choose to include a 6 month co-op cycle in to their studies. Students may also choose to complete specialized advanced certificates as part of their studies in either: biomedical technology development; biomaterials and tissue engineering; bioinformatics; or may pursue a dual-degree MS option. 

Additional Information

Andres Kriete, PhD
Associate Director for Graduate Studies
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems
ak3652@drexel.edu

Rami Seliktar, PhD
Vice President
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems
seliktar@drexel.edu

For more information, visit the The School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems website.

Master of Science Degree Requirements

The core requirements for the master's in biomedical engineering encompass approximately 45.0 course credits. (Most courses carry three credits each.) A thesis is highly recommended. A non-thesis option is also offered. Students who choose the non-thesis option must take 51.0 credits of coursework and cannot register for thesis or research credits.

The curriculum includes room for specialization in several focus areas of biomedical engineering, as well as a concentration in biomedical technology development.


Core Courses
BMES 501Medical Sciences I3.0
BMES 502Medical Sciences II3.0
BMES 503Medical Sciences III3.0
BMES 672Biosimulation I3.0
BMES 673Biosimulation II3.0
BMES 864Seminar0.0
Electives
The sum of electives, core credits, and/or thesis credits must total 45.0 for thesis students and and 51.0 for non-thesis students. Elective choices would depend upon the student's area(s) of focus or concentration.
Thesis
BMES 897Research1.0-12.0
BMES 898Master's Thesis *0.5-20.0

*

The research for the thesis may include work carried out during an internship.

 

Biomedical Technology Development Concentration

Students enrolled in this concentration will develop an understanding of critical regulatory, economic, and legal issues in addition to the project management skills that facilitate the development of new medical devices and positive working relationships with intellectual property lawyers, insurance companies, and the federal government.

Core Courses
BMES 509Entrepreneurship for Biomedical Engineering and Science3.0
BMES 534Design Thinking for Biomedical Engineers3.0
BMES 538Biomedical Ethics and Law3.0
BMES 588Medical Device Development3.0
BMES 590Clinical Rotation3.0
Total Credits15.0

PhD in Biomedical Engineering Degree Requirements

To be awarded the PhD degree, students must complete 90.0 required credits and fulfill the one-year residency requirement.

The following milestones have to be satisfied during the course of the program:

  • Students must successfully pass the candidacy examination.
  • Students must submit a PhD dissertation proposal and successfully defend it.
  • Students must write a dissertation and successfully pass final oral defense.

Post-Baccalaureate Requirements and Post-Master's Requirements
Both post-baccalaureate and post-master's students are admitted into the doctoral program in Biomedical Engineering, but have slightly differing sets of requirements.

For post-master’s students, 45.0 of the credits that they earned toward their Master’s degree may be applied toward the PhD. If coming from the Master’s program in Biomedical Engineering at Drexel University, those courses they took would apply. For non-Drexel students who have completed their master’s elsewhere, there may be exceptions made. If these students believe that they have covered the material of the required courses in another program, they must show evidence of such material and obtain a formal waiver of this requirement from the Graduate Advisor.

For post-baccalaureate students, students must complete a minimum of 90.0 credits and a research thesis. These 90.0 credits include the core courses required by Drexel’s MS in Biomedical Engineering.


Core Courses
BMES 501Medical Sciences I3.0
BMES 502Medical Sciences II3.0
BMES 503Medical Sciences III3.0
BMES 672Biosimulation I3.0
BMES 673Biosimulation II3.0
BMES 864Seminar0.0

In addition to the required courses, post-baccalaureate PhD students must take at least 21.0 more credits in courses. This balance may be taken as research and/or thesis/dissertation credits.

Thesis Advisor/Plan of Study
During the first year of the program all Doctoral students are required to identify a Thesis Advisor and complete a plan of study. The student’s Thesis Advisor and the Graduate Advisor will guide the student in developing this plan of study. Each plan of study is individually tailored to the student, and includes a combination of research and course credits most beneficial and complimentary to the student’s chosen thesis topic.

The Candidacy Examination
Doctoral students must successfully pass a candidacy examination, preferably at the end of the first year of their study, but no later than the end of the second year.

The overall objective of the candidacy examination is to test the student's basic knowledge and preparedness to proceed toward a PhD in Biomedical Engineering. The candidacy examination contains two parts: a written portion and a pre-proposal. In the written portion of the candidacy examination, students are expected to demonstrate physical science aptitude and a preparation to formulate and model biomedical problems. The pre-proposal portion focuses on the formulation of a brief research protocol of a specific study, its presentation to a committee of five faculty members, an the student's ability to successfully answer relevant questions.

After a satisfactory performance on the candidacy examination the student is awarded the Doctoral Candidate status. Candidates must submit a Thesis Proposal by the end of the second year and defend it in an oral presentation to a committee of five faculty members.

Thesis Defense
After the student has successfully completed all the necessary research and composed a thesis manuscript, in accordance with the guidelines specified by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies, he or she then must formally defend their thesis. A formal thesis defense includes an oral presentation of research accomplishments in front of a committee of faculty members. The thesis defense is open to the general public.

Prospective PhD students are welcome to contact the school to discuss their research interests. For a more detailed description of the PhD requirements, please visit the School of Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems' Biomedical Engineering web site.

Areas of Specialization

Areas of specialization can be pursued within the Biomedical Engineering graduate program. Students can plan their own focus area that will give them strength in a particular sub-discipline. Alternatively, the student can specialize by conducting research and writing a thesis.

Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
Biomaterials and tissue engineering is designed to provide students with advanced training in cellular and molecular biology relevant to tissue engineering and behavior of materials used in biomedical applications.

Biomedical Technology Development
Students pursuing the concentration will develop an understanding of critical regulatory, economic, and legal issues in addition to the project management skills that facilitate the development of new medical devices and positive working relationships with intellectual property lawyers, insurance companies, and the federal government. (This is a formal concentration with specific course requirements.)

Bioinformatics
Bioinformatics emphasizes a systems engineering approach to provide a foundation in systems biology and pathology informatics. Students are provided with hands-on experience in the application of genomic, proteomic, and other large-scale information to biomedical engineering as well as experience in advanced computational methods used in systems biology: pathway and circuitry, feedback and control, cellular automata, sets of partial differential equations, stochastic analysis, and biostatistics.

Biomechanics and Human Performance Engineering
Biomechanics and human performance engineering is designed to meet two objectives: to acquaint students with the responses of biological tissues to mechanical loads as well as with the mechanical properties of living systems and to provide students with the background and skills needed to create work and living environments which improve human health and enhance performance. Biomechanics and human performance also involves the study of orthopedic appliances and the broader aspect of rehabilitation engineering and the management of disability.

Biomedical Systems and Imaging
Biomedical systems and imaging focuses on the theoretical and practical issues related to machine vision, image processing and analysis, and signal processing associated with such medical applications as well biomedical instrumentation and product development.

Neuroengineering
Neuroengineering is broadly defined to include the modeling of neural and endocrine systems, neural networks, complexity in physiological systems, evolutionary influences in biological control systems, neurocontrol, neurorobotics, and neuroprosthetics.

Courses

BMES 501 Medical Sciences I 3.0 Credits

First course in a three-course sequence designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of biology and physiology from an engineering perspective. This first course covers evolution, genetics, molecular biology and basic cellular physiology.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 502 Medical Sciences II 3.0 Credits

Second course in a three-course sequence designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of biology and physiology from an engineering perspective. This second course covers tissues, muscle and nerve function, cardiovascular systems and respiration.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 501 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 503 Medical Sciences III 3.0 Credits

Third course in a three-course sequence designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of biology and physiology from an engineering perspective. This third course covers renal and digestive systems. However, the major emphasis is on biological control systems ? nervous, endocrine and immune system structure and function.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 502 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 504 Medical Sciences IV 4.0 Credits

Mechanical, physical, electrical, and mathematical models of living systems, including feedback control systems. The laboratory part includes computer simulation so that data obtained from laboratory experiments may be compared with those predicted from models.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 505 Mathematics for Biomedical Sciences I 3.0 Credits

This course is for students of biology and related medical fields aimed at bridging the gap between qualitative and quantitative approaches in the study of biological processes. Topics include single and multivariable calculus infinte series, etc.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 506 Mathematics for Biomedical Sciences II 3.0 Credits

This course for students of biomedical sicence or biomedical engineering is designed to permit the student to go on to advanced studies in engineering and science in which differential equations are needed. Biological applications are emphasized.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 505 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 507 Mathematics for Biomedical Sciences III 3.0 Credits

This course covers topics in Fourier series and orthogobnal functions, partial differential equations, and boundary value problems Applications are made to problems in neuro-physiology, cellular transport, and biological oscillations.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 506 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 508 Cardiovascular Engineering 3.0 Credits

This course emphasizes engineering approaches to the analysis of the cardiovascular system focusing on fundamental mechanics and emerging technologies.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 501 [Min Grade: B] and BMES 502 [Min Grade: B] and BMES 503 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 509 Entrepreneurship for Biomedical Engineering and Science 3.0 Credits

This course serves as the foundation course in entrepreneurship and is designed to provide students with a complete working knowledge of the modern entrepreneurial and business planning process.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 510 Biomedical Statistics 4.0 Credits

This course introduces the graduate student to the fundamentals of inferential statistics with biomedical applications. It covers topics in data presentation, sampling, experimental design, probability and probability distributions, significance tests, and clinical trials.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 511 Principles of Systems Analysis Applied to Biomedicine I 3.0 Credits

Covers formulation of biological problems by rigorous mathematical techniques, including application of conservation laws, network theorems, and mesh and nodal analysis.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 512 Principles of Systems Analysis Applied to Biomedicine II 3.0 Credits

Continues BMES 511. Emphasizes input/output transfer function problems, linear systems and linear operations, and impulse response.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 513 Biomedical Electronics 3.0 Credits

Physical principles in the operation of both integrated circuits and discrete components. Analysis and design of transducers, amplifiers, oscillators, logic circuits, etc., with particular application to biomedical problems. (BMS).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 514 Computer Applications in Biomedical Research 3.0 Credits

This course is intended to familiarize students with at least one computer language and to demonstrate computer applications in diagnosis, monitoring, and biomedical signal processing. (BMS).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 515 Experimental Design in Biomedical Research 4.0 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of experimental design and statistical analysis as applied to biomedical research with animals and humans. Topics to be covered include experimental design, clinical design, and protocol submission and review.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 510 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 517 Intermediate Biostatistics 3.0 Credits

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the statistical tools commonly used in biomedical and health sciences research. The course will provide the student with a basic theoretical background on the procedures of repeated measures ANOVA and selected multivariate statistical tests. It will familiarize students with the use of computer-based statistical analyses.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 510 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 518 Interpretation of Biomedical Data 3.0 Credits

The focus of this course is on understanding the methods used to analyze and interpret the results of quantitative data analyses in the biomedical and health sciences and determine their meaningfulness (clinical significance). Fundamental to this process is an understanding of the interrelatedness of statistical power, effect size, sample size and alpha.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 510 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 520 Introduction to Medical Science 3.0 Credits

The course is designed to acquaint professionals with the fundamentals of structure and function of biomedical systems from an engineering perspective. The course introduces the basics of molecular biology, cellular biology, anatomy and physiology.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CMPD.

BMES 521 Principles of Bioengineering 3.0 Credits

Principles of transduction and measurement, including characterization of the measurements systems, and invasive vs. noninvasive methods. (BME).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 522 Principles of Bioengineering II 3.0 Credits

In-depth analysis of selected electromechanical transducer principles; review of important transduction methods in bioengineering; biopotential electrodes and chemical electrodes. (BME).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 523 Principles of Bioengineering III 3.0 Credits

Microprocessor applications in biomedical engineering, including interfacing, data processing, display, and storage. (BME).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 524 Introduction to Biosensors 4.0 Credits

An introductory course in the general area of microsensors covering basic sensing mechanisms and various types of conductometric, acoustic, silicon, optical and MEMS microsensors. Two case studies involving biosensors and acoustics sensors allow students to acquire in-depth knowledge in the theory and design of microsensors.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 525 Advanced Biosensors 4.0 Credits

The second course in a two-course sequence, this course covers aspects of modern biosensor design methods and addresses challenges associated with fabrication technologies and instrumentation techniques. Topics covered include the theory and modeling of biosensors, fabrication steps, and testing methods.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 531 Chronobioengineering I 3.0 Credits

This course advances the student's knowledge of biological time-keeping and adaptive functions of biological clocks. It includes such topics as biochemical and physiological models of biological blocks, adjustment to environmental cycles and rhythms in behavior and models.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 503 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 532 Chronobioengineering II 3.0 Credits

This course continues BMES 531. It covers topics in the patterns, rhythms, evolution, neurology, psychology and overall functions of sleep.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 531 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 534 Design Thinking for Biomedical Engineers 3.0 Credits

This course is a studio-seminar exploring principles and theories of product design, systematic design process, problem-solving, decision-makingand design as authorship. The course uses design research methods and topical design issues to explore and experience design thinking.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 535 Introduction to Product Design for Biomedical Engineers 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to basic product design techniques. It combines lectures, demonstrations, discussions and problem solving exercises exploring product design as a creative process in the production of simple objects. Students develop a command of product development, skills in modeling and communication of their novel solutions.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 534 [Min Grade: D] or PROD 101 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 538 Biomedical Ethics and Law 3.0 Credits

Introduces a wide spectrum of ethical, regulatory, and legal issues facing health care practitioners and biomedical researchers. The course helps students become aware of the ethical and legal issues involved in their work while increasing the student's understanding of how legal and ethical decisions should be made in biomedical research, as well as what sources of help and guidance are available.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 541 Nano and Molecular Mechanics of Biological Materials 3.0 Credits

This course aims to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and latest scientific developments in molecular mechanics of biological materials. The first half of the course will introduce interdisciplinary theoretical background including molecular physics, electrostatics, colloidal science, biocompatibility and polymer mechanics. The second half will describe the most recent advances in nanotechnology and nanomechanics-related biomechanical and biomedical research. Students are expected to understand the fundamental knowledge of the molecular-level phenomena in biological systems, and to grasp the basic design and operation principles of nanomechanical instruments.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 543 Quantitative Systems Biology 4.5 Credits

This course uses a systems engineering approach to provide a foundation in systems biology and pathology informatics. Topics covered include the robust complex network of genes and proteins; cell as basic units of life; communication of cells with other cells and the environment; and gene circuits governing development.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 544 Genome Information Engineering 4.5 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience in the application of genomic, proteomic, and other large-scale information to biomedical engineering. The underlying goal is to develop an understanding of highthrough experimental technologies, biological challenges, and key mathematical and computational methods relevant to biomedical engineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 543 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 545 Biosystems Modeling 4.5 Credits

This course provides hands-on experience in advanced computational methods used in systems biology: pathway and circuitry, feedback and control, cellular automata, sets of partial differential equations, stochastic analysis, and biostatistics.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 503 [Min Grade: C] and (BMES 512 [Min Grade: C] or BMES 561 [Min Grade: C])

BMES 546 Biocomputational Languages 4.0 Credits

This course provides hands-on education in C/C++, MATLAB, Java, and Perl languages used in biomedical applications. The principle application areas to be investigated include image analysis, feedback and control systems, algorithms on strings and sequences, database interactions, Web interactions, and biostatistics.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 551 Biomedical Signal Processing 3.0 Credits

Introduces discrete time signals and systems; origin and classification of biomedical signals; data acquisition, filtering, and spectral estimation of medical signals; compression of medical signals; new processing approaches and time-frequency representation and wavelets.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 552 Introduction to Bioacoustics 3.0 Credits

This course covers essential materials for anyone who is interested in the application of acoustical waves in biomedical and material science. The main objective is to familiarize students with the propagation of acoustic waves in different media, with particular emphasis on biomedical applications.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 561 Introduction to Systems Analysis in Biomedical Engineering & Science 3.0 Credits

This course acquaints students with the methods of dynamical systems analysis as used to understand biological phenomena. Uses mathematical/engineering models from several areas of biological/medical research to describe the function of systems.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 563 Robotics in Medicine I 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the use of haptics (the use of somtaosensory information) in the design of robotic devices in surgery. Topics covered include actuators, sensors, nonportable feedback, portable force feedback, tactile feedback interfaces, haptic sensing and control systems.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 565 Robotics in Medicine II 3.0 Credits

This course covers the use of robots in surgery and included aspects of safety, robot kinematics, analysis of surgical performance using robotic devices, inverse kinematics, velocity analysis and acceleration analysis. Various types of surgeries in which robotic devices are or could be used are presented on a case study basis.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 563 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 566 Robotics in Medicine III 3.0 Credits

This course covers topics in the design of medical robotic systems, including force and movement analysis for robotic arms, dynamics, computer vision and vision-based control. Thus use of haptics, vision systems and robot dynamics are examined in a cohesive framework.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 565 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 571 Biological Evolution: Applications to Human Health and Performance 4.0 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with an evolutionary perspective on health and disease. The focus is on humans as products of evolution by natural selection and as such, subject to the same relationships and historical precedents that govern the rest of the natural world. Topics to be covered include ecological damage and emerging diseases, sociobiological perspectives on behavioral disorders, the development of resistance in pathogens, and adaptation and maladaptation of humans to urban environments.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 588 Medical Device Development 3.0 Credits

Medical device product development must take into account a diverse set of disciplines to achieve a safe and successful product. This course exposes the student to several of these disciplines with the objective of raising the student¿s awareness of safety throughout the product development life cycle. Students will learn to appreciate the complex engineering decisions that support development of a safe medical device through an examination of risk management, regulatory processes, human factors and clinical studies.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 821 [Min Grade: C-]

BMES 590 Clinical Rotation 3.0 Credits

Students are exposed to the problems and issues surrounding the practice of medicine in a modern hospital. Every 2 weeks students will be paired with a medical professional and observe clinical applications and procedures as well as other administrative functions. Actual topics covered vary from offering to offering. Course is run off campus at local hospitals.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits

BMES 594 Clinical Practicum I 3.0 Credits

This course provides biomedical engineering students with an extensive exposure to live clinical cardiology procedures, including cardiac catheterization, electrophysiology, echocardiography and nuclear stress testing. Emphasis is placed on identifying important interfaces between engineering and clinical medicine, particularly in areas where clinical needs may be addressed by advances in biomedical engineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 595 Clinical Practicum II 3.0 Credits

This course provides biomedical engineering students with an extensive exposure to live operations in an emergency department an intensive care until. The students are expected to analyze specific operations within these environments and develop a solution to a process problem within one of these environments. System analysis, design and evaluation are emphasized.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 596 Clinical Practicum III 3.0 Credits

This course provides biomedical engineering students with an opportunity to observe basic operative and postoperative procedures with the idea of both learning about such procedures and identifying the role of biomedical engineering in these clinical settings.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 601 Anatomy I 2.0 Credits

The anatomy sequence surveys the gross and microscopic structure of the human body with emphasis on the structure-function relationship. This course is concerned with cell structure, histology, and tissues.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 602 Anatomy II 2.0 Credits

Continues BMES 601. Functional gross anatomy.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 603 Anatomy III 2.0 Credits

Continues BMES 602. Neuroanatomy.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 604 Pharmacogenomics 3.0 Credits

Covers the interaction between chemical agents and biological systems at all levels of integration. Discusses general classes of drugs, with particular emphasis on general concepts and problems of medical importance.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 611 Biological Control Systems I 3.0 Credits

Introduces the basic concepts of feedback control systems, including characterization in terms of prescribed constraints, study of input and output relationship for various types of biological systems, and stability and time delay problems in the pupillary reflex/eye-hand coordination system.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 612 Biological Control Systems II 3.0 Credits

Covers receptors, skeletal-muscle control systems, vestibular feedback, and sampled-data models.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 613 Biological Control Systems III 3.0 Credits

Covers mathematical models of biological systems, with emphasis on non-linear and adaptive systems study.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 621 Medical Imaging Systems I 4.0 Credits

Provides an overview of the field of medical imaging. Covers aspects of light imaging; systems theory, convolutions, and transforms; photometry, lenses, and depth of field; image perception and roc theory; three-dimensional imaging; image acquisition and display; and image processing operations, including scanning and segmentation.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 622 Medical Imaging Systems II 4.0 Credits

Introduces medical visualization techniques based on ultrasound propagation in biological tissues. Includes generation and reception of ultrasound, imaging techniques (A-mode, B-mode, M-mode, and Doppler), typical and emerging diagnostic applications, elements of ultrasound exposimetry, and safety aspects from the clinical point of view.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 621 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 623 Medical Imaging Systems III 4.0 Credits

Introduces elements of wave imaging, including wave propagation, Fourier optics and acoustics, limitations on resolution, ultrasound transducer characterization, and synthetic aperture systems. Examines MRI imaging in detail, including physical principles and scanning methodologies. Includes aspects of the psychophysics of human vision.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 622 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 625 Biomedical Ultrasound I 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the propagation of ultrasound in inhomogeneous media such as tissue, and discusses imaging principles and basics of tissue characterization. Discusses ultrasound instrumentation, including A-and B-mode scanners. Presents simple tissue models based on ultrasound wave absorption and scattering, and examines properties of tissue-mimicking materials and tissue phantoms. Covers ultrasound transducer models and discusses advantages and disadvantages of various transducer configurations. Outlines the principles of acoustic output measurements and discusses instrumentation requirements. Includes ultrasound exposimetry and biological effects of ultrasound.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 626 Biomedical Ultrasound II 3.0 Credits

Covers the theory and construction of array transducers for imaging, Doppler ultrasound systems and their application to the study of blood flow, and continuous wave and pulsed systems and Doppler imaging. Discusses the mechanisms for biological effects of ultrasound, including thermal and mechanical interaction of ultrasound energy and tissue.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 628 Ultrasound Wave Motion in Solids and Piezoelectrics 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the physics of wave propagation in solids, acquainting the student along the way with the necessary tensor formalism. The origin and behavior of longitudinal and shear bulk waves, surface waves, and plate waves are derived. The ultrasound behavior of piezoelectrics is analyzed and the results are applied to the analysis of piezoelectric transducers and ultrasound signal-processing devices.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 631 Tissue Engineering I 4.0 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize students with advanced concepts of cellular and molecular biology relevant to tissue engineering. This is the initial course in a three-course sequence combining materials from life science, engineering design and biomaterials to educate students in the principles, methods and technology of tissue engineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 503 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 632 Tissue Engineering II 4.0 Credits

This course familiarizes students with advanced concepts of developmental and evolutionary biology relevant to tissue engineering. The second part of a three-course sequence combines materials from cellular/molecular biology, evolutionary design, and biomaterials to education students in the principles and methods of tissue engineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 631 [Min Grade: B]
Corequisite: BMES 661

BMES 641 Biomedical Mechanics I 4.0 Credits

Designed to acquaint students with the response of biological tissues to mechanical loads and with the mechanical properties of living systems. Covers topics in musculoskeletal anatomy and functional mechanics; a review of mechanical principles, statics, dynamics, and materials; soft and hard tissue mechanics; mechano-pathological conditions in biological tissues and their correction; and prosthetics.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 642 Biomedical Mechanics II 4.0 Credits

Continues BMES 641.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 643 Biomedical Mechanics III 4.0 Credits

Continues BMES 642.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 644 Cellular Biomechanics 3.0 Credits

This course of cellular bioengineering focuses on mechanics and transport. Material builds upon undergraduate engineering education to place engineering mechanics into the context of biological function at the cellular level.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 651 Transport Phenomena in Living Systems I 3.0 Credits

Covers physical principles of momentum, energy, and mass transport phenomena in blood and other biological fluids; diffusion and convection at the microcirculatory level; physiology of arteries and veins; and local and systemic blood flow regulation and vascular disease.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 503 [Min Grade: C] and BMES 681 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 660 Biomaterials I 4.0 Credits

First course in a three-quarter sequence designed to acquaint students with the behavior of materials used in biomedical application under load (i.e., mechanical properties), their modes of failure and as a function of their environment. This course provides students with the fundamentals needed to proceed with Biomaterials II.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 661 Biomaterials II 4.0 Credits

Second course in a three-quarter sequence in biomaterials. The goal of this course is with an understanding of, and ability to select, appropriate materials for specific applications taking into account mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties taught in Biomaterials I and combining them with the biocompatibility issues covered in the present course.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Junior or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

BMES 672 Biosimulation I 3.0 Credits

This course focuses upon the mathematical analysis of biomedical engineering systems. As the first course in the biosimulation sequence, the course is a blend of analytical and numerical methods with strong emphasis on analytical approaches. The class concentrates on the application of mathematical concepts to biomedical problems drawn from physiological systems, cellular and molecular systems, bioimaging and biomedical device design.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 673 Biosimulation II 3.0 Credits

The second in a two-course sequence, this course focuses upon the mathematical modeling and subsequent computational analysis of complex biological systems. Specific examples are drawn physiological systems, cellular and molecular systems, bioimaging and biomedical device design and analysis. Topics covered include: modeling of complex bioengineering systems; parameter estimation and optimization of such models; and application of probability and statistical approaches as required.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 672 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 675 Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering III 4.0 Credits

This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of factor-mediated tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Students learn about fundamental repair and regenerative processes and gain an understanding of specific biomaterials being used to mimic and/or enhance such processes. Students also learn about the delivery methods of agents which promote the proper functional development of specialized tissues.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 660 [Min Grade: C-] and BMES 661 [Min Grade: C-] and BMES 631 [Min Grade: C-] and BMES 632 [Min Grade: C-]

BMES 676 Software Development for Health Science Instruction 3.0 Credits

This course presents the planning, development and evaluation of computer software for instruction and clinical decision support in the area of health care. Particular emphasis is given to the Macintosh computer and the preparation of compiled "stand-alone" programs.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 680 Special Topics 9.0 Credits

Covers topics of particular interest that may not be offered every term or every year. Also included in this category are courses under development.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BMES 681 Physics of Living Systems I 3.0 Credits

Designed for the biomedical science student with a background in life sciences. Reviews and expands on basic concepts in physics as applied in biological systems. Topics include mechanics, exponential growth and decay, thermodynamics, and diffusion and membrane transport.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 682 Physics of Living Systems II 3.0 Credits

Covers advanced topics in biophysics for both biomedical science and biomedical engineering students.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 683 Physics of Living Systems III 3.0 Credits

Covers advanced topics of current interest in biomedical engineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 710 Neural Signals 3.0 Credits

This course covers aspects of neural signaling, including fundamentals of action potential generation, generator potentials, synaptic potentials, and second messenger signals. Students learn Hodgkin-Huxeley descriptions, equivalent circuit representations and be able to derive and integrate descriptive equations and generate computer simulations.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 711 Principles in Neuroengineering 3.0 Credits

This course is an in-depth student of some of the cutting-edge technologies in neuroengineering. The course draws on faculty in the College of Medicine and School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems to present and investigate three topics in neuroengineering.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 710 [Min Grade: B]

BMES 722 Neural Aspects of Posture and Locomotion I 3.0 Credits

Studies physiology of sensory/motor systems, with emphasis on modeling of neural systems and biomechanical aspects of functional tasks. Begins with an analysis of the transportation of materials in and out of cells, followed by an examination of the origin and maintenance of membrane potentials. Discusses intra-and extracellular and surface measurement of potentials, generation and transmission of action potentials, synaptic processes, and the structure/function of muscle. Combines these elements to study reflex systems as well as vestibular and ocular effects on posture. Culminates in the study of the control of motor systems with respect to bipedal locomotion.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 725 Neural Networks 3.0 Credits

Explores the mathematical and biological bases for neurocomputing. Involves construction by students of computer simulations of important models and learning algorithms. Discusses applications to pattern recognition, vision, speech, control, and psychological modeling.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 210 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 731 Advanced Topics in Ultrasound Research I 3.0 Credits

Explores subjects of current interest through review of the literature by faculty, students, or invited lecturers.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BMES 732 Advanced Topics in Ultrasound Research II 3.0 Credits

Continues BMES 731. Discusses current developments and research in medical and industrial ultrasound, and geophysical and underwater signal processing.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 731 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 799 Independent & Supervised Study 9.0 Credits

Course and credits arranged with individual advisers.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BMES 821 Medical Instrumentation 3.0 Credits

Provides a broad overview of the applications of health care technology in diagnosis and therapy. Reflects the persuasiveness of biomedical engineering in medicine by describing medical instrumentation and engineering technology used in most of the main areas of specialization in medicine.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 822 Medical Instrumentation II 3.0 Credits

The objective of this course is to prepare the student for following an industry-accepted standard for designing a medical device. Students will work in teams to identify and design a response to medical need. The resulting design will either address an unmet medical need or present an improved approach to an existing solution. After identifying a particular project, the students will learn and implement particular processes for both design and dcoumentation.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits
Prerequisites: BMES 821 [Min Grade: C] or (BMES 391 [Min Grade: C] and BMES 392 [Min Grade: C])

BMES 823 Medical Instrument Laboratory 2.0 Credits

Provides laboratory exercises, including pulmonary function testing, stress testing, EKG, electrosurgery, and x-ray.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 821 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 825 Hospital Administration 3.0 Credits

Provides an analysis of the administrative process, including planning, organization, design, decision-making, leadership, and control. Presents methodologies and techniques that can contribute to the effective performance of administrative responsibilities examined in the light of significant and unique factors in hospital health care administration.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 826 Hospital Engineering Management 3.0 Credits

Covers the wide range of responsibilities of a clinical engineer, including managing a clinical engineering department, setting up an electrical safety program, establishing an equipment maintenance program, approaches for equipment acquisition, pre-purchase evaluation, and incoming inspection. Includes medical legislation, liability, and risk management.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BMES 825 [Min Grade: C]

BMES 864 Seminar 0.0 Credits

An invitation seminar for discussion of research topics in biomedical engineering and science. Attendance of all graduate students in the institute is required. (None may be repeated for credit.).

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 866 Seminar II 2.0 Credits

Continues BMES 865.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 867 Seminar III 2.0 Credits

Continues BMES 866.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 897 Research 1.0-12.0 Credit

Requires investigation of a biomedical problem under the direction of a faculty adviser.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

BMES 898 Master's Thesis 0.5-20.0 Credits

Requires the study and investigation of a research or development problem. Requires results to be reported in a thesis under the direction of a faculty adviser. No credit granted until the thesis is completed and approved.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

BMES 998 Ph.D. Dissertation 1.0-12.0 Credit

Requires the study and investigation of a research or development problem. Requires results to be reported in a dissertation under the direction of a faculty adviser. No credit granted until the dissertation is completed and approved.

College/Department: School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems Faculty

Fred D. Allen, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Professor. Tissue engineering, cell engineering, orthopedics, bone remodeling, wound healing, mechanotransduction, signal transduction, adhesion, migration.
Sriram Balasubramanian, PhD (Wayne State University). Assistant Professor. Structural characteristics of the pediatric thoracic cage using CT scans and developing an age-equivalent animal model for pediatric long bones.
Kenneth A. Barbee, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Cellular biomechanics of neural and vascular injury, mechanotransduction in the cardiovascular system, mechanical control of growth and development for wound healing and tissue engineering.
Lin Han, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Nanoscale structure-property relationships of biological materials, genetic and molecular origins soft joint tissue diseases, biomaterials under extreme conditions, coupling between stimulus-responsiveness and geometry.
Uri Hershberg, PhD (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel). Assistant Professor. Bioinformatics, immunology, neural computation, system biology, somatic selection, autoimmunity, genetic stability, germline diversity, dendritic cell, transcription elements, pathogens, computational and mathematical modeling, complex systems, cognition and inflammation.
Joshua Jacobs, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Professor. Neuroengineering, electrocorticography (ECoG), electroencephalography (EEG), single-neuron spiking, brain oscillations, episodic memory, working memory, spatial navigation, conceptual representations.
Dov Jaron, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Calhoun Distinguished Professor of Engineering in Medicine. Professor. Mathematical, computer and electromechanical simulations of the cardiovascular system.
Andres Kriete, PhD (University in Bremen Germany) Associate Director for Graduate Studies and Academic Operations. Systems biology, bioimaging, control theory, biology of aging, skin cancer.
Ryszard Lec, PhD (University of Warsaw Engineering College). Professor. Biomedical applications of visoelastic, acoustoptic and ultrasonic properties of liquid and solid media.
Peter Lewin, PhD (University of Denmark, Copenhagen-Lyngby) Richard B. Beard Professor, School Of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems. Professor. Biomedical ultrasonics, piezoelectric and polymer transducers and hydrophones; shock wave sensors.
Hualou Liang, PhD (Chinese Academy of Sciences). Associate Professor. Neuroengineering, neuroinformatics, cognitive and computational neuroscience, neural data analysis and computational modeling, biomedical signal processing.
Donald L. McEachron, PhD (University of California at San Diego) Associate Director. Research Professor. Animal behavior, autoradiography, biological rhythms, cerebral metabolism, evolutionary theory, image processing, neuroendocrinology.
Karen Moxon, PhD (University of Colorado). Associate Professor. Cortico-thalamic interactions; neurobiological perspectives on design of humanoid robots.
Banu Onaral, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania) H.H. Sun Professor / Director, School of Biomedical Engineering Science and Health Systems. Professor. Biomedical signal processing; complexity and scaling in biomedical signals and systems.
Kambiz Pourrezaei, PhD (Rensselaer Polytechnic University). Professor. Thin film technology; nanotechnology; near infrared imaging; power electronics.
Arye Rosen, PhD (Drexel University) Biomedical Engineering and Electrical Engineering. Microwave components and subsystems; utilization of RF/microwaves and lasers in therapeutic medicine.
Ahmet Sacan, PhD (Middle East Technical University). Assistant Professor. Indexing and data mining in biological databases; protein sequence and structure; similarity search; protein structure modeling; protein-protein interaction; automated cell tracking.
Joseph J. Sarver, PhD (Drexel University). Teaching Professor. Neuromuscular adaptation to changes in the myo-mechanical environment.
Rahamim Seliktar, PhD (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow) Vice Director, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems. Professor. Limb prostheses, biomechanics of human motion, orthopedic biomechanics.
Adrian C. Shieh, PhD (Rice University). Assistant Professor. Contribution of mechanical forces to tumor invasion and metastasis, with a particular emphasis on how biomechanical signals may drive the invasive switch, and how the biomechanical microenvironment interacts with cytokine signaling and the extracellular matrix to influence tumor and stromal cell behavior.
Wan Young Shih, PhD (Ohio State University) School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems. Associate Professor. Piezoelectric microcantilever biosensors development, piezoelectric finger development, quantum dots development, tissue elasticity imaging, piezoelectric microcantilever force probes.
Kara Spiller, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Professor. Cell-biomaterial interactions, biomaterial design, and international engineering education.
Aydin Tozeren, PhD (Columbia University) Distinguished Professor and Director, Center for Integrated Bioinformatics, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems. Professor. Breast cell adhesion and communication, signal transduction networks in cancer and epithelial cells; integrated bioinformatics, molecular profiling, 3D-tumors, bioimaging.
Margaret Wheatley, PhD (University of Toronto) School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, John M. Reid Professor. Ultrasound contrast agent development (tumor targeting and triggered drug delivery), controlled release technology (bioactive compounds), microencapsulated allografts (ex vivo gene therapy) for spinal cord repair.
Yinghui Zhong, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Spinal cord repair, and engineering neural prosthesis/brain interface using biomaterials, drug delivery, and stem cell therapy.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Douglas L. Chute, PhD (University of Missouri) Louis and Bessie Stein Fellow. Professor. Neuropsychology and rehabilitation; technological applications for the cognitively compromised and those with acquired brain injuries.
Patricia A. Shewokis, PhD (University of Georgia). Professor. Roles of cognition and motor function during motor skill learning; role of information feedback frequency on the memory of motor skills, noninvasive neural imaging techniques of functional near infrared spectroscopy(fNIR) and electroencephalograpy (EEG) and methodology and research design.

Emeritus Faculty

William Freedman, PhD (Drexel University). Professor Emeritus. Motor control; sensory and motor systems; reflexes; eye movements; neural networks.
John M. Reid, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Calhoun Professor Emeritus. Professor Emeritus. Diagnostic ultrasound, wave propagation and scattering in inhomogeneous media, imaging, instrumentation.
Hun H. Sun, PhD (Cornell University). Professor Emeritus. Biological control systems, physiological modeling, systems analysis.
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