Economics

Major: Economics
Degree Awarded: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 60.0 (Post-Master's degree) or 90.0 (Post-Bachelor's degree)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 45-0603
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code:
19-3011

About the Program

Drexel's PhD program in Economics prepares economists for academic research as well as careers in government or industry by providing a solid background in economic theory, quantitative analysis, and analytical tools at the advanced level. Each year a relatively small number of PhD students are accepted into the program, which allows for a collegial environment where the PhD students interact with faculty on a daily basis. Requirements for the MS in Economics program are satisfied if the coursework associated with the first and second years of the PhD program are complete.

The PhD program in Economics offers three fields of study:

  • Industrial Organization
  • International Trade
  • Open Economy Macroeconomics

The PhD program in Economics is also particularly strong in applied microeconometrics.  

Students typically complete their coursework in two years and the PhD degree in five. Students work as research and teaching assistants under the supervision of a faculty member. After their second year, students can teach independently.

Additional information can be found online at the PhD Program in Economics page as well as in the LeBow College of Business LeBow PhD Handbook

To apply and for application information please check online at the LeBow PhD Admissions webpage. 

Questions should be addressed to lebowphd@drexel.edu

Admission Requirements

The LeBow College of Business: School of Economics seeks applicants with exceptional ability and motivation. For the PhD, the School places emphasis on applicants who can provide evidence of strong potential in a research-oriented program. In general, prior training at either the undergraduate or graduate level in economics and mathematics is strongly encouraged. All courses in the program expect a preparation of at least principles of economics and basic statistics. Students who lack some part of this preparation may be considered for admission conditional on their completing the appropriate undergraduate courses as non-matriculated students during the summer term before they begin the program in the fall.  

Admission is competitive and highly selective.

 In reviewing an applicant's credentials, the faculty will consider the following factors:

  • Prior Academic Accomplishments: The faculty will examine all course work taken prior to application, paying particular attention to the specific courses that have been completed. Applicants should have attained a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for all undergraduate course work completed. They also should have attained a minimum 3.3 average for any graduate-level course work taken. The faculty generally expects applicants to demonstrate a substantially higher level of accomplishment than these minimum requirements. A master's degree is not a requirement.
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE): Applicants are required to submit GRE scores. GRE scores are not accepted if they are more than five years old.
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL): Applicants whose native language is not English and who have not already received a degree from a U.S. university must also submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
  • Personal Statement/Essay: Each applicant must submit a personal statement. The personal statement should explain the applicant's educational and personal experiences that have influenced the decision to pursue a PhD and should discuss the candidate's career plans and goals. The faculty are especially interested in learning about an applicant's prior research experience and the commitment to future research in the applicant's area of specialization.
  • Letters of Recommendation: Two letters of recommendation must be submitted in support of the application. Applicants are strongly encouraged to seek recommendations from academics or other professionals who can assess the applicant's likelihood of success in a research-oriented PhD program.

Admission Procedures

The PhD Programs in Economics admits students each fall. To be considered for admission, the completed application must be received by the LeBow College of Business Office of Graduate Admissions no later than January 15th. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that all transcripts, test scores and letters of recommendation, as well as the application form and the personal statement, are received by Drexel University no later than January 15th.

Assistantships and Financial Aid

The LeBow College of Business strives to provide graduate assistantships to all entering PhD students. Each applicant to the PhD program is automatically considered for a graduate assistantship as well as for admission into the program. First-year graduate assistants are assigned to work with a faculty member on research activities. During the second and subsequent years, graduate assistants are generally assigned a combination of teaching and research responsibilities. Assistants receive a stipend and 27.0 credits of tuition remission per academic year. Doctoral students who are making satisfactory progress toward the degree can expect to be provided with an assistantship for at least four years.

Degree Requirements

The PhD in Economics program prepares economists for careers in research, teaching, business, and government. It is designed to provide students with not only a broad understanding of modern economics, but also the opportunity to conduct high quality research in a number of specific fields of study including industrial organization, international economics, and health economics.

In the second year of study, the PhD in Economics offers three fields of specialization: industrial organization, international trade, and open economy macroeconomics. Students complete courses in two of these fields of specialization.

Curriculum 

60.0 credits (Post-Master's degree)
90.0 credits (Post-Bachelor's degree)

  • 27.0 credits of first year core courses
  • 18.0 credits of economics field requirements
  • 15.0 credits (minimum) of dissertation research
  • 30.0 additional dissertation research credits for students without a Master's degree

Core Program

All PhD students pursue a common set of core courses. The following courses are all completed during the first year, with the exception of ECON 941 Econometrics II, which is completed in the second year.

Core Courses
ECON 902Mathematical Economics3.0
ECON 910Advanced Microeconomics I3.0
ECON 911Advanced Microeconomics II3.0
ECON 920Advanced Macroeconomics I3.0
ECON 921Advanced Macroeconomics II3.0
ECON 940Econometrics I3.0
ECON 941Econometrics II3.0
ECON 942Applied Microeconometrics *3.0
ECON 980Game Theory3.0
STAT 931Statistics for Economics3.0
Total Credits30.0
*

Taken in the second year.

 First-Year Examination

After the completion of the core coursework, students are examined on their competence in the core material and their readiness to proceed.

Fields of Specialization
Students are required to complete the coursework for at least two of the following fields/sequences.
Industrial Organization
Industrial Organization I
Industrial Organization II
Industrial Organization Seminar
International Trade
International Trade
Empirical International Trade
International Trade Seminar
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Macroeconomic Dynamics
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Open Economy Macro Seminar

 Electives

In addition, students can take elective courses from the Economics Department, from any other departments in the College of Business, and from departments in other Colleges of Drexel University. The following is a set of sample electives:

ECON 930Monetary Economics3.0
ECON 952Health Economics3.0
ECON 955Public Economics3.0
ECON 964Economic Development3.0
ECON T980Special Topics in ECON0.5-9.0
Additional courses with the permission of the advisor3.0
Dissertation Research12.0
Dissertation Research in Economics

Courses

ECON 548 Mathematical Economics 3.0 Credits

Discusses the application of mathematics in economic models, with extensive discussion of economic applications of calculus and other mathematical tools. Considers implications of the assumptions of maximization of profits and utility. Stresses mathematical models and techniques useful in theoretical and applied applications of economics.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ECON 550 Econometrics 3.0 Credits

Economics 550 is an applied course in econometrics for Masters students. The course covers some statistical tools to understand economic relationships. Economic applications will be discussed and real economic data will be analyzed.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: STAT 601 [Min Grade: C] or STAT 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 560 Time Series Econometrics 3.0 Credits

The objectives of this course are to introduce the students to time series econometric models and to provide them with tools for empirical analysis using time series economic and financial data, with specific emphasis on application and forecasting.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: STAT 610 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 550 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 601 Managerial Economics 3.0 Credits

Covers demand and cost analysis, pricing policies, and selected topics of economic analysis as they relate to business policies.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BUSN 502 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 610 Microeconomics 3.0 Credits

Covers consumer and producer behavior, responses to price changes, cost functions, and various market structures, including perfect market competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Applies theories to issues in resource markets and international trade.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ECON 614 Macroeconomics 3.0 Credits

Provides an in-depth analysis of dominant theories behind short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth. Employs both mathematical and graphical tools to discuss determination of output, employment, and price level in the aggregate economy. Also covers effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies in dealing with unemployment and inflation. Emphasizes the use of theory to understand past and current macroeconomic events.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 548 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 616 Public Finance and Cost Benefit Analysis 3.0 Credits

Introduces market failure as a justification for government provision of public goods and regulation. Covers public choice theory and cost-benefit analysis for public expenditure, impact of taxation on efficiency, incidence of taxes, personal and corporate income taxes, and fiscal federalism.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BUSN 502 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 630 International Economics 3.0 Credits

Examines the theoretical principles guiding international trade. Emphasizes the gains from trade, exchange rates, and balance-of-payments adjustments.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 601 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 634 History of Economic Analysis 3.0 Credits

Traces the development of economic principles and ideas to the present time. Emphasizes the historical changes that have taken place in the frameworks of economic analysis.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: BUSN 502 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 202 [Min Grade: C] or (BUSN 507 [Min Grade: C] and BUSN 508 [Min Grade: C])

ECON 639 Applied Industrial Analysis 3.0 Credits

This course will provide students with the theoretical and empirical tools to determine how markets work and to answer a variety of policy-relevant questions. For each topic, students will use real data and court documents to justify their conclusions, so econometrics is a prerequisite for taking the course.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 610 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 550 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 650 Business & Economic Strategy: Game Theory & Applications 3.0 Credits

This course discusses business strategy in the context of the "game theory" approach to strategic interaction, with additional tools drawn from industrial organization and economic theory. Alternative approaches to pricing strategy, strategic investment, strategies of technological innovation, market entry, and information release; strategy for design of and participation in auctions.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 601 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 610 [Min Grade: C] or STAT 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 661 Health Economics 3.0 Credits

Use analytical techniques from microeconomics to analyze the inter-relationship between health care resources, providers, consumers, and markets.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 601 [Min Grade: C] or ECON 610 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 662 Economic Analysis of Health Systems 3.0 Credits

Using applies microeconomic models developed in ECON 661, this course analyzes the government's role in health care. Methodology for economic evaluation of health care intervention and analysis of the pharmaceutical industry.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 661 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 700 Economics Seminar 3.0 Credits

The Economics Seminar is a course designed to give students who have completed the first four quarters of the MS program in economics an opportunity to put what they have learned to work, and gain wider and deeper knowledge of the field, though discussions and writing.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if program is MSECON.

ECON 902 Mathematical Economics 3.0 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide Ph.D. students with a survey of the basic math tools applied in the study of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Econometrics and related areas such as Finance.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ECON 910 Advanced Microeconomics I 3.0 Credits

This course is intended to introduce the student to a rigorous treatment of Microeconomic Theory. Topics include an introduction to choice theory; the representative consumer's utility maximization problem; and the firm's profit maximization problem and choice under certainty.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 902 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 911 Advanced Microeconomics II 3.0 Credits

This course is a continuation of Advanced Microeconomics I. Topics to be covered include competitive markets, oligopoly model, adverse selection, signaling, screening, moral hazard, the principle-agent problem and auctions.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 910 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 920 Advanced Macroeconomics I 3.0 Credits

This course introduces student to the basic tools and structures used in modern macroeconomic research. The course covers basic general equilibrium models of business cycles and growth including two period models: finite horizon models and infinite horizon models in both discrete and continuous time.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 902 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 921 Advanced Macroeconomics II 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to models and techniques used extensively in macroeconomics. While focusing on tools, the course presents and discusses competing theories of monetary aspects of macroeconomic and short-run fluctuations in a closed economy, with several extensions to the open-economy setting.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 920 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 925 Macroeconomic Dynamics 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to advanced methods and current research in Macroeconomics. The course will focus on dynamic macroeconomic models including theory, policy implications and numerical solution methods. Topics will be selected from Growth Theory, DSGE models, Calibration, Labor, Monetary Economics, Search Theory, and Banking and Business Cycles.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is PhD.
Prerequisites: ECON 920 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 921 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 930 Monetary Economics 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to give students in-depth knowledge of the models used to investigate the interactions between real and monetary factors. Topics covered include short-run real effects of monetary policy, the credit channel of money, and types and effectiveness of monetary policy rules.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 920 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 940 Econometrics I 3.0 Credits

This course is an introduction to applied econometric techniques beyond Ordinary Least Squares (OLS). Many of the questions that arise in economics cannot be studies using linear estimation methods. Nonlinear estimation techniques will be presented with emphasis on interesting economic questions that can be analyzed using these methods.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: STAT 931 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 941 Econometrics II 3.0 Credits

This course examines advanced topics in time-series econometrics and its application to economic/finance research, unit-root tests, bivariate and multivate co-integration relationships, causality and error correction models, vector autoregression models, and the time-varying heteroskedastic behavior of economic and financial data.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 940 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 942 Applied Microeconometrics 3.0 Credits

This course provides an advanced, in-depth study of many of the popular techniques used in the analysis of microeconomic data. Topics will include panel data, identification of causal effects, and Generalized Method of Moments estimation. The course will present theoretical models but will stress the implementation of the models to applied settings and the interpretation of the empirical results.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is PhD.
Prerequisites: ECON 940 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 950 Industrial Organization I 3.0 Credits

This course is an introduction to theoretical industrial organization. We will examine how firms interact in markets characterized by imperfect competition.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 911 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 951 Industrial Organization II 3.0 Credits

This course introduces the student to research methods in industrial organization. The primary focus is on the use of empirical analysis, although relevant theoretical papers are discussed.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 950 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 952 Health Economics 3.0 Credits

This course discusses the economics of the health care system including government programs and policies that influence health.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 910 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 940 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 955 Public Economics 3.0 Credits

This course discusses the welfare effects of government expenditure programs, taxes, and other policies including their incentive effects on firms and households.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 910 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 940 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 959 Industrial Organization Seminar 3.0 Credits

This course will be team-taught by Economics faculty members whose research interest lie in the areas of Industrial Organization (theoretical and applied). It will be a continuation of IO-I (theory) and IO-II (applied).

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 951 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 960 International Trade 3.0 Credits

This course provides the student with an understanding of the theory of International Economics and some empirical issues. Topics include: determinants of trade patterns, gains from trade, international factor mobility, factor market distortions, strategic trade policy, and issues related to the theory of commercial policy and international finance.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 910 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 961 Empirical International Trade 3.0 Credits

The purpose of this course is for students to be familiar with a number of important topics and papers in the empirical trade literature.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 960 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 962 Open Economy Macroeconomics 3.0 Credits

This course emphasizes macroeconomic issues and policies in an open-economy setting. Topics covered include: monetary and exchange rate regimes, international capital flows, and current issues in international macroeconomic policy.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 920 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 940 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 964 Economic Development 3.0 Credits

This course examines a number of theoretical and empirical issues in economic development of underdeveloped economies, including topics dealing with growth, inequality, human capital, the relationship between international trade and economics development, and credit and labor market imperfections.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 910 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 969 International Trade Seminar 3.0 Credits

This course is the last of a three-course sequence of international trade at the graduate level. The course will be jointly taught by faculty with expertise in theoretical and/or empirical aspects of international trade and public policy.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 960 [Min Grade: C] and ECON 961 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 979 Open Economy Macro Seminar 3.0 Credits

The objective of the course is to introduce students to current/relevant topics in open economy macroeconomics (OEM) and international finance (IF) and get them started on their own individual research. The course emphasizes international macroeconomic and financial topics in an open-economy setting and relevant international policy issues. The course is organized as a broad-based reading on main issues in OEM/IF and producing and presenting a research paper.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ECON 962 [Min Grade: C]

ECON 980 Game Theory 3.0 Credits

This course introduces concepts and tools of game theory as they enter into business and economics research. Topics to be covers include Nash equilibrium, games in extensive form and repeated games, together with critical and scholarly controversies about game theory.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ECON 998 Dissertation Research in Economics 1.0-12.0 Credit

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON I599 Independent Study in ECON 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON I699 Independent Study in ECON 0.5-12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON I799 Independent Study in ECON 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON I899 Independent Study in ECON 12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON I999 Independent Study in ECON 3.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

ECON T580 Special Topics in ECON 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON T680 Special Topics in ECON 0.5-9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON T780 Special Topics in ECON 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON T880 Special Topics in ECON 12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

ECON T980 Special Topics in ECON 0.5-9.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: LeBow College of Business
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

School of Economics Faculty

Marco Airaudo, PhD (University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia). Associate Professor. Computational economics, international economics, macroeconomics and monetary economics.
Patricia Awerbuch, MBA (Drexel University). Assistant Clinical Professor. Performance of on-campus students in an online classroom designed for distance learners; business professors.
Richard Barnett, PhD (University of Minnesota). Clinical Professor. Economic theory, macroeconomics.
Sebastien Bradley, PhD (University of Michigan). Assistant Professor. Public finance, international economics.
Mian Dai, PhD (Northwestern University). Assistant Professor. Managerial economics and strategy.
Pia DiGirolamo, PhD (Purdue University). Assistant Clinical Professor. Macroeconomics, international finance.
Matthew Freedman, PhD (University of Maryland). Associate Professor. Labor economics, public economics.
Shawkat M. Hammoudeh, PhD (University of Kansas). Professor. Applied econometrics, financial economics, international economics, and natural resource economics.
Teresa D. Harrison, PhD (University of Texas Austin) Associate Dean, Academic Affairs. Associate Professor. <em>School of Economics</em> Econometrics, public finance, industrial organization, empirical microeconomics including health and nonprofit organizations.
Paul E. Jensen, PhD (Penn State University) Associate Dean, College of Business. Associate Professor. International trade. Primary research interest is international trade, particularly in empirical studies of international trade patterns.
Bang Nam Jeon, PhD (Indiana University) Department of Economics and International Business. Professor. Financial economics, world financial market linkages, foreign direct investment flows in the Asia-Pacific economies, the Korean economy: currency crisis, FDI, and macroeconomic issues, regional economic integration and newly industrializing economies: the
Stephen Joyce, MA (Temple University). Assistant Clinical Professor. Education and human capital.
Andre Kurmann, PhD (University of Virginia). Associate Professor. Computational economics, financial economics, labor economics, macroeconomics and monetary economics.
Christopher A. Laincz, PhD (Duke University). Associate Professor. Economic development, technological change, and growth, industrial organization, macroeconomics and monetary economics.
Philip Luck, PhD (University of Califorinia, Davis). Assistant Professor. International economics, international trade.
Vibhas Madan, PhD (Michigan State University). Professor. International trade theory, applied microeconomics.
Roger A. McCain, PhD (Louisiana State University). Professor. Computational economics, game theory.
Bruce D. McCullough, PhD (University of Texas Austin). Professor. Applied Econometrics, Data Mining, Econometric Techniques, Reliability of Statistical and Econometric Software.
Irina Murtazashvili, PhD (Michigan State University). Assistant Professor. Applied econometrics.
Maria Olivero, PhD (Duke University). Associate Professor. Macroeconomics, international finance.
Eydis Olsen, MA (American University). Clinical Associate Professor. Macroeconomics, political economy.
Tristan Potter, PhD (Boston College). Assistant Professor. Macroeconomics, labor.
Konstantinos Serfes, PhD (University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana). Professor. Industrial organization; microeconomics.
Ricardo Serrano-Padial, PhD (University of California at San Diego). Assistant Professor. Microeconomics theory, information economics with applications in finance, macroeconomics and industrial organization.
Mark Stehr, PhD (University of California at Berkeley) Assistant Director School of Economics. Associate Professor. Health economics, health behaviors, public finance, public policy.
Constantinos Syropoulos, PhD (Yale University) Trustee Professor of International Economics. Professor. International trade, political economy, applied microeconomics.
Matthew Weinberg, PhD (Princeton University). Associate Professor. Antitrust and regulation, applied econometrics, industrial organization.
Yoto Yotov, PhD (Boston College). Associate Professor. International trade, applied microeconomics, political economy.

Emeritus Faculty

Edward C. Koziara, PhD (University of Wisconsin). Professor Emeritus. Applied micro and macro economics.
Bijou Yang Lester, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus. Behavioral characteristics of shopping on-line, economic issues of electronic commerce, contingent employment and part-time work, the economy and suicide.
Andrew G. Verzilli, PhD (Boston College). Professor Emeritus. Teaching effectiveness in economics; economics and financial history.
Chiou-shuang Yan, PhD (Purdue University). Professor Emeritus. International economics, input-output analysis.
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