English

Bachelor of Arts Degree: 182.0 quarter credits

About the Program

Specifically designed to engage students in critical thinking and applied writing skills, the English major offers a wide-ranging curriculum on British, American and World literatures and stresses the cultural, historical and political contexts that shape and affect literary production. The Department of English and Philosophy also offers variety of courses on periods and genres; creative writing; and the relationship between literature and the visual arts, science and technology. 

Students develop solid techniques in critical inquiry as well as in writing, literary, and reading skills. Implicit in our undertaking is the leadership role of our department in the formulation and discussion of such broad theoretical and practical questions as the following: the connection between oral and written communication skills; analytical, ethical, and critical thinking; questions of value and morality; the relevance and relation of the past to the present; the relations between and among cultures; the role of literary and philosophical texts in our attempts to explain human motives and behavior; and the relations between the sexes. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Degree Requirements 

University Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience3.0
Two Mathematics Courses6.0-8.0
Two Science Courses6.0-8.0
Foreign Language Courses
Any two (2) consecutive foreign language courses (completing level 201)8.0
Humanities and Fine Arts
Select four of the following:12.0
History of Art I: Ancient to Medieval
History of Art II: High Renaissance to Modern
History of Art: Early to Late Modern
Dance Appreciation
Introduction to Dance
History of Dance
Twentieth Century Dance
American Classic Cinema
The Documentary Tradition
Contemporary Cinema
Intermediate Cinematography
Introduction to Music
Music History I
Music History II
Rock Music Through the Mid-60s
Rock Music Since the Mid-60s
Introduction to Western Philosophy
Critical Reasoning
Metaphysics
Epistemology
Aesthetics
Ethics
Photography
Photographic Principles
Theatrical Experience
Theatre History I
Theatre History II
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Select four of the following:12.0
Human Past: Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology
Worldview: Science, Religion and Magic
Mass Media and Society
Techniques of Speaking
Themes in World Civilization I
Themes in World Civilization II
Themes in World Civilization III
Introduction to Political Science
History of Political Thought
General Psychology I
Developmental Psychology
Approaches to Personality
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
Sociology of the Family
International Studies
Select two of the following:6.0
Topics in World Ethnography
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
International Communication
International Public Relations
International Negotiations
European Cinema
Non-Western Cinema
The United States & Central America: From Monroe Doctrine to Cold War
The Great War, 1914-1918
World War II
History of Europe in the 20th Century
Introduction to Latin American History
World Musics
Global Ethical Issues
International Politics
Globalization
Studies in Diversity
Select two of the following:6.0
Introduction to Africana Studies
Cross Currents in Africana Studies
Introduction to Cultural Diversity
Anthropology of Gender
Intercultural Communication
American Ethnic Literature
Jewish Literature and Civilization
Women and Literature
Topics in African American Literature
Themes in African-American History
United States Civil Rights Movement
American Slavery
Freedom in America
Race and Film in United States History
Women and Work in America
Women in American History
Modern Jewish History
Jewish Literature and Civilization
Jewish Life and Culture in the Middle Ages
Modern Jewish History
Afro-American Music USA
Race and Ethnic Relations
Developing Nations and the International Division of Labor
Introduction to Women's Studies
Women and Society in a Global Context
African American Herstories
Major Requirements
Foundational and Professional Courses
ENGL 205 [WI] American Literature I3.0
ENGL 206 [WI] American Literature II3.0
ENGL 211 [WI] British Literature I3.0
ENGL 212British Literature II3.0
ENGL 315 [WI] Shakespeare3.0
ENGL 380Literary Theory3.0
ENGL 490Seminar in English and American Literature4.0
ENGL 492Seminar in World Literature4.0
ENGL 499Senior Project in Literature4.0
Select three of the following:9.0
Classical to Medieval Literature
Renaissance to the Enlightenment
Romanticism to Modernism
Post-Colonial Literature I
Post-Colonial Literature II
African American Literature
Readings in Fiction
Readings in Poetry
Readings in Drama
Select three of the following:9.0
Period Studies
Major Authors
Topics in World Literature
The Bible as Literature
Mythology
Select three of the following:9.0
The Mystery Story
Literature of Baseball
Literature of the Holocausts
Literature and Other Arts
American Ethnic Literature
Jewish Literature and Civilization
Women and Literature
Literature and Society
Topics in African American Literature
Special Studies in Literature
Independent Project in Literature
Philosophy in Literature
Creative and Professional Writing
Select five of the following:15.0
Writing About the Media
Literary Editing & Publication
The Practice of Professional Writing
Writing in Cyberspace
Internship in Literary Publishing
Fundamentals of Journalism
On-line Journalism
Technical Communication
Investigative Journalism
Electronic Publishing
Desktop Publishing
The Peer Reader in Context
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Creative Writing
Writing Poetry
Writing Fiction
Writing Humor and Comedy
Screenwriting I
Screenwriting II
Science and Technology in the Humanities
Select four of the following:12.0
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
Science Fiction
Topics in Literature and Medicine
History of Science: Ancient to Medieval
History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity
Technology in Historical Perspective
Technology in American Life
Computer Ethics
Engineering Ethics
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Medicine
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Science
Electives
Free Electives30.0
Total Credits182.0-186.0


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
HIST 161Themes in World Civilization I3.0
Math Elective 4.0
Foreign Language Course (1st consecutive course) 4.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
HIST 162Themes in World Civilization II3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Foreign Language Course (2nd consecutive course, 201-level) 4.0
Math Elective4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 3
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
MUSC 130Introduction to Music3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
ENGL 205 [WI] American Literature I3.0
ENGL 211 [WI] British Literature I3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective 3.0
Lab Science Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 5
ENGL 206 [WI] American Literature II3.0
ENGL 212British Literature II3.0
International Studies Elective3.0
Lab Science Elective 3.0
Diversity Studies Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
ENGL 202 [WI] Romanticism to Modernism3.0
ENGL 203 [WI] Post-Colonial Literature I3.0
SOC 210Race and Ethnic Relations3.0
WMST 101Introduction to Women's Studies3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
COM 300 [WI] On-line Journalism3.0
ENGL 207 [WI] African American Literature3.0
ENGL 216 [WI] Readings in Drama3.0
Free Elective 3.0
Science, Technology and Human Affairs Elective*3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 340Desktop Publishing3.0
ENGL 315 [WI] Shakespeare3.0
WRIT 220 [WI] Creative Nonfiction Writing3.0
Free Electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
WRIT 310Literary Editing & Publication3.0
English Major Foundational Courses*6.0
Free Electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
ENGL 300 [WI] Literature & Science3.0
ENGL 323Literature and Other Arts3.0
ENGL 360 [WI] Literature and Society3.0
Free Electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
ENGL 380Literary Theory3.0
HIST 281History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity3.0
PHIL 361Philosophy of Science3.0
ENGL 492
or 490
Seminar in World Literature
Seminar in English and American Literature
4.0
Free Electives 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 12
ENGL 499Senior Project in Literature4.0
WRIT 312The Practice of Professional Writing3.0
Free Electives 8.0
 Term Credits15.0
Total Credit: 182.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.

 


Co-op/Career Opportunities

English majors pursue many professional fields in addition to teaching and creative writing. Many go on to law school, politics and government, or business careers. The critical thinking, analytical and writing skills provided by our program are essential for high-level decision-making and problem solving in any professional situation.

Co-op employment is an option for English majors who can explore co-op or internship opportunities at Philadelphia museums, city government and visitors’ bureaus, television and radio stations, law firms, and nonprofit organizations.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Minor in English 

The English minor provides students from other majors with a more intensive background in literature. Coursework in the minor exposes students to literature from a variety of periods, cultures and genres and also provides practice in critical thinking, literary analysis and writing. These courses enrich students' intellectual lives and provide them with skills that are valuable in a variety of professional situations.

Where a course required for the minor is already required for a student's major, the student is directed to choose another English elective. Other substitutions are permissible at the discretion of the Program Director.


Requirements
Select three of the following:9.0
Classical to Medieval Literature
Renaissance to the Enlightenment
Romanticism to Modernism
Post-Colonial Literature I
Post-Colonial Literature II
American Literature I
American Literature II
African American Literature
British Literature I
British Literature II
Readings in Fiction
Readings in Poetry
Readings in Drama
Select two of the following:6.0
Creative Nonfiction Writing
Creative Writing
Writing Poetry
Writing Fiction
Writing Humor and Comedy
Special Topics in Writing
Writing About the Media
Literary Editing & Publication
The Practice of Professional Writing
Writing in Cyberspace
Internship in Literary Publishing
Select three of the following:9.0
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
Science Fiction
The Mystery Story
Literature of Baseball
Literature of the Holocausts
Period Studies
Shakespeare
Major Authors
Topics in World Literature
The Bible as Literature
Mythology
American Ethnic Literature
Jewish Literature and Civilization
Women and Literature
Literature and Society
Topics in African American Literature
Topics in Literature and Medicine
Literary Theory
Total Credits24.0


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Courses

ENGL 101 Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research 3.0 Credits

Develops students' abilities to use writing as a tool for inquiry as they think through open-ended questions. Introduces them to rhetorical concepts and terms—exigence, audience, context, argument, and appeals—that they will apply in their writing and critical reading. Teaches them how to find, evaluate, integrate, and document sources from a variety of media; and how to engage in the many stages of the research and writing processes, from invention, to review, to final product. Engages them in ongoing reflective analysis about writing and their writing development.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

ENGL 102 Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion 3.0 Credits

Teaches terminology and rhetorical strategies of persuasive writing. Advances students’ development in the writing process, and promotes their critical evaluation and integration of varied sources as they research complex and open-ended problems. Engages them in the act and study of collaboration, rhetorical awareness of images and design, and an understanding of how genres shape writing. Continues to promote their critical reading of challenging texts. Supports students in ongoing reflective analysis about writing and their writing development.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 101 [Min Grade: D]

ENGL 103 Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres 3.0 Credits

Teaches terminology and rhetorical strategies of writing analytically about a theme as it appears in a variety of genres. Advances students’ development in the writing and research processes, in their rhetorical awareness of images and design, and in their understanding of how genres of writing (poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction argumentative, investigative, academic, business, reportorial) shape meaning. Continues to promote their critical reading of challenging texts. Supports students in ongoing reflective analysis about writing and their writing development.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 102 [Min Grade: D]

ENGL 105 Honors Freshman English 3.0 Credits

Develops students' abilities to read and write expository and persuasive academic discourse. Teaches students the components of the writing process and strategies to think and read critically and to present a written argument. Requires students to write expository and persuasive essays and research papers and to keep a journal to express their responses to the material read and studied in the course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is HONR.

ENGL 200 [WI] Classical to Medieval Literature 3.0 Credits

A survey of Greek and Roman literature (Homer, Aeschylus, Euripides, Virgil and Cicero), up to and including the Medieval period (Aquinas, Cavalcanti, Chaucer, and Dante). This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 201 Renaissance to the Enlightenment 3.0 Credits

A survey of Western literature from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, focusing on works by Cervantes, Erasmus, Rabelais, Petrarch, Voltaire, Rousseau, Swift and Pope.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 202 [WI] Romanticism to Modernism 3.0 Credits

A survey of Western literature of the 19th and 20th centuries focusing on the major periods of Romanticism (Blake, Coleridge and Keats), Realism (Balzac and Ibsen), and Modernism (Kafka, Borges and Woolf). This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 203 [WI] Post-Colonial Literature I 3.0 Credits

A survey of nonwestern literatures produced before the modern era in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, representing the more important periods and genres. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 204 Post-Colonial Literature II 3.0 Credits

A survey of nonwestern literatures written in the 20th century by writers from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, and focusing on the effects of social, aesthetic and contemporary events on artistic creation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 205 [WI] American Literature I 3.0 Credits

A survey of American literature from Colonial times through the Civil War, including works by such writers as Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Cotton Mather, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau and Walt Whitman. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 206 [WI] American Literature II 3.0 Credits

A survey of American literature from the Civil War through the 21st century, including works by such writers as Kate Chopin, W.E.B. Du Bois, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James, Philip Roth, Mark Twain and John Updike. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 207 [WI] African American Literature 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to African-American Literature, from the mid-18th century to the present. Provides a basic understanding of social, political and cultural influences and an awareness of the African-American literary tradition. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 211 [WI] British Literature I 3.0 Credits

A historical survey of British literature from its beginning to the end of the eighteenth century. Students will read texts selected to represent major authors, forms and thematic material that illustrates the development of English literature through the medieval, Renaissance, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 212 British Literature II 3.0 Credits

A historical survey of British literature form the turn of the nineteenth century to the present; students will read texts selected to represent major authors, forms and thematic material of the Romantic, Victorian and modern periods.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 214 Readings in Fiction 3.0 Credits

A basic course, which focuses on fiction as a genre through the study of a variety of short stories and fiction, organized by theme, period or form. One of three genre courses.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 215 [WI] Readings in Poetry 3.0 Credits

A basic course which focuses on poetry as a genre through the study of a variety of poems organized by theme, period or form. One of three genre courses. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 216 [WI] Readings in Drama 3.0 Credits

A basic course which focuses on drama as a genre through the study of a variety of plays organized by theme, period or form. One of three genre courses. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 300 [WI] Literature & Science 3.0 Credits

This course studies the impact of scientific and technological change on works of literature and art produced in various historical periods. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 302 Environmental Literature 3.0 Credits

This course explores the relatively recent discipline of Ecocriticism and considers the literary relationship between human beings and the natural environment--both altered and unaltered by human activity. The approach is interdisciplinary in its investigation of the relationships among science, culture, and personal observation. Students will read a selection of seminal texts of American environmental literature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 303 Science Fiction 3.0 Credits

Provides reading and discussion of works illustrating the development of modern science fiction.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 304 Young Adult Fiction 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to young adult (YA) fiction and to secondary sources useful for the appreciation of it. Topics discussed include: young adults as n audience, the genres of YA fiction, keeping up with YA fiction, literary and psychological theory applied to YA fiction.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 305 [WI] The Mystery Story 3.0 Credits

A study of the mystery story, from its inception as a genre in the 19th century to the present, through short stories and novels. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 306 Literature of Baseball 3.0 Credits

An examination of novels, short stories, and poetry about our "national pastime" that illumine American ideals and values, history and culture from 1845 to the present. A study of how the game's symbols and rituals, its history and mythology help us understand American belief systems and ideologies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 307 Literature of the Holocausts 3.0 Credits

To underline the fact that more than one Holocaust has occurred, the course offers different points of view about the systematic slaughter of several religious and ethnic groups, pre-and post-World War II, through fiction, children's literature and films.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 308 [WI] The Literature of Business 3.0 Credits

In this advanced reading course, students read literary works about business and work and write analytically about these works, grounding that analysis in nonfiction readings from business publications. Course writing assignments ask students to respond to problems and issues raised in the texts. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: (ENGL 101 [Min Grade: D] and ENGL 102 [Min Grade: D] and ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D]) or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 310 [WI] Period Studies 3.0 Credits

This is a variable topics course, focusing on the literature of a particular period (i.e., Classical Literature; Victorian Literature; the Harlem Renaissance). May be repeated for credit. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 312 Research Project Development 1.0-3.0 Credit

Acquisition of knowledge and skills related to the development of researchable original ideas that involves literature, philosophy, history, or any other humanities area, or a creative work or portfolio.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 315 [WI] Shakespeare 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on Shakespeare's major plays and sonnets, providing the historical and cultural contexts that gave rise to his work. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 320 [WI] Major Authors 3.0 Credits

A course focused on intensive study of one or more authors, for example: Jane Austen; Joseph Conrad; Hemingway, Faulkner and Fitzgerald; Writers of the Harlem Renaissance; Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. May be repeated for credit. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 323 Literature and Other Arts 3.0 Credits

A variable topics course which studies relationships between literature and one or more of the visual arts, theater or music (i.e., Surrealism; Memoir and Documentary Film; The Faust Legend). May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: D]

ENGL 325 Topics in World Literature 3.0 Credits

A variable topics course which focuses on a particular national or regional literature within its cultural, historical and political contexts (i.e., African Literature; French Literature; Latin American Literature). May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 330 The Bible as Literature 3.0 Credits

This course provides a close reading of selected books of the Old and New Testaments alongside selected literary works to discover both the literary qualities of these texts and their influence on literature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 335 Mythology 3.0 Credits

This course investigates the specific forms mythological stories have taken in the literature, art and ritual of some or all of the following: Greece, Rome, Iceland, Mesopotamia and Native American and European cultures in the United States.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 340 [WI] Classic Rhetoric 3.0 Credits

A study in the theory and practical application of Greek and Roman rhetorical strategies in composition. Focuses on influential figures, terminology, the five canons, and the ancient composition processes known as “progymnasmata” to look at historical texts, the rhetoric of popular media, and the students’ writing. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 101 [Min Grade: D] and ENGL 102 [Min Grade: D]

ENGL 345 American Ethnic Literature 3.0 Credits

A variable topics course which studies the literature of one or more of the United States ethnic populations within their historical and cultural contexts. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 350 Jewish Literature and Civilization 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the Jewish Bible, a classic literary document of Western civilization, deemed by many people of the world as fundamental to their religion; stresses aspects of cultural diversity and awareness.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 355 [WI] Women and Literature 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on literature written by, and/or about women and considers issues relating to women's place in literary history. May be repeated for credit. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 360 [WI] Literature and Society 3.0 Credits

This course examines the relationship between literature and the society it reflects and helps shape. May be repeated for credit. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 365 Topics in African American Literature 3.0 Credits

A variable topics course designed to further develop the ideas first presented in the African American Lit survey by exploring, in much more depth, significant authors, periods, and genres within the African American literary and cultural tradition. Topics include Science and Technology in African American Lit; the Slave Narrative; and Black Travel Writing.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 370 Topics in Literature and Medicine 3.0 Credits

This is a variable topics course which focuses on aspects of illness, healing, care-giving, aging, grief, and mortality as presented in narrative. Exploration of how literary construction and analysis affect understanding of these experiences. Topics include ?Illness and Healing in Literature? and ?The Physician in Literature and Film.? May be repeated three times for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

ENGL 380 Literary Theory 3.0 Credits

This course examines literary theoretical thinking, and focuses on twentieth century structuralism, post-structuralism, and contemporary theory. We will examine the ways in which language is conceived and reconceived by major theoretical writers and the implications of this rethinking for conceptualizations of history, politics, ideology, sexuality, and trauma, among others.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENGL.
Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: ENGL 101 [Min Grade: C] and ENGL 102 [Min Grade: C] and (ENGL 202 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 203 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 204 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 205 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 206 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 211 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 212 [Min Grade: C] or ENGL 214 [Min Grade: C])

ENGL 395 [WI] Special Studies in Literature 3.0 Credits

This is a variable topics course, providing intense literary study on a specific theme. May be repeated for credit. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 399 Independent Project in Literature 0.5-12.0 Credits

This course provides independent study on a project for one term only.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Prerequisites: ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: A]

ENGL 470 Capstone Seminar in Medical Humanities 3.0 Credits

This seminar gives students the opportunity to synthesize, contextualize, and deepen their understanding of how disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences approach the experiences and implications of illness, aging, mortality and healing. Regular guest lecturers, discussion of assigned readings, student presentations, and written projects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is CMDH.
Prerequisites: (ENGL 103 [Min Grade: D] or ENGL 105 [Min Grade: D]) and HUM 315 [Min Grade: B]

ENGL 490 Seminar in English and American Literature 4.0 Credits

An advanced course with variable topics in British or American Literature stressing textual analysis, cultural and historical contexts and research; provides students with intensive preparation for advanced and professional studies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 12 credits
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENGL and classification is Junior or Senior.

ENGL 492 Seminar in World Literature 4.0 Credits

An advanced course with variable topics in World Literature stressing textual analysis, cultural and historical contexts and research; provides students with intensive preparations for advanced and professional studies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 12 credits
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENGL and classification is Junior or Senior.

ENGL 499 Senior Project in Literature 4.0 Credits

Open to English Majors only, the senior project in literature should reflect the student's interest in a specific subject, author or theme and should demonstrate the student's research, critical and analytical expertise at an advanced, pre-professional level.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ENGL and classification is Senior.

English Faculty

Jan Armon, PhD (University of Michigan). Assistant Teaching Professor. Academic functions of personal writing, composition.
Valarie Meliotes Arms, PhD (Temple University) Associate Director of the First-Year Writing Program. Professor.
Kenneth Bingham, MA (Temple University). Teaching Professor. First-year writing; engineering ethics.
Valerie Booth, PhD (Emory University) Associate Director, Certificate in Writing and Publishing. Assistant Teaching Professor.
Raymond Brebach, PhD (University of Illinois) Director, Programs in English. Associate Professor. Modern British fiction; the novel; textual studies.
André Carrington, PhD (New York University). Assistant Professor. Cultural politics of race, gender and genre; feminism criticism; critical race theory.
Paula Marantz Cohen, PhD (Columbia University) Distinguished Professor of English; Co-editor, Journal of Modern Literature; Host of the Drexel Interview. Professor. Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century English and American literature; film studies.
Albert DiBartolomeo, MA (Temple University) Co-Director, Drexel Publishing Group. Teaching Professor. Creative writing, first-year writing.
Dan Driscoll, MA (Temple University) Associate Director, Writing Center. Associate Teaching Professor. First-year writing.
Anne Erickson, PhD (Purdue University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Online educational applications; the short story cycle.
Lisa Farley, MEd (Temple University) Coordinator, English as a Second Language (ESL) . Associate Teaching Professor.
Robert Finegan, MFA (University of Pittsburgh). Associate Teaching Professor. First-year writing; technical and creative writing.
Alexis Finger, MS (Queens College, CUNY). Associate Teaching Professor. Speech; ESL; oral communication.
Valerie Fox, PhD (SUNY at Binghamton) Founding Editor, Press I. Associate Teaching Professor. Twentieth century drama; modern and contemporary American poetry; first-year writing.
Edward Fristrom, PhD (State University of New York-Albany). Assistant Teaching Professor. Professional writing, creative writing, multimedia, and writing education.
Gabriella Ibieta, PhD (City University of New York). Associate Professor. Comparative literature; Cuban and Latin American fiction.
Rebecca Ingalls, PhD (University of Michigan) Director, First-Year Writing Program. Associate Professor. Composition and rhetoric.
Henry Israeli, MFA (University of Iowa) Associate Director, Certificate in Writing and Publishing. Assistant Teaching Professor. Founder and editor of Saturnalia Books, a publisher of contemporary poetry.
Miriam Kotzin, PhD (New York University) Founding Director, Certificate in Writing and Publishing; Founding Editor, Per Contra. Associate Professor. American literature; genre studies; creative writing; communications.
Stephen Mandell, PhD (Temple University). Professor. First-year writing; technical writing; speech; American literature.
Deirdre McMahon, PhD (University of Iowa). Assistant Teaching Professor. 19th-century British literature and culture: empire, critical race studies and analyses of material culture.
Kathleen McNamee, MA (Cambridge University). Associate Teaching Professor. Nineteenth-century American literature; British Modernism; first-year writing.
Marianallet Mendez, PhD (University of Minnesota). Assistant Teaching Professor. Use of the mass media to secure, maintain and enhance political power; international technical communication—including issues of translation v. localization.
Harriet Levin Millan, MFA (University of Iowa) Director, Certificate in Writing and Publishing. Associate Teaching Professor.
Christopher Nielson, PhD (Purdue University). Teaching Professor. Shakespeare; renaissance drama and literature; dramatic literature; first-year writing.
Karen Nulton, PhD (Rutgers University) Director, Writing Assessment. Assistant Teaching Professor. Writing assessment, writing pedagogy, and writing across the curriculum.
Emilie S. Passow, PhD (Columbia University) Co-Director, Certificate Program in Medical Humanities. Associate Teaching Professor. Judaic studies; medical humanities; nineteenth-century British literature.
Margene Peterson, MA (Rhode Island School of Design). Instructor. English as a Second Language (ESL).
Abioseh Michael Porter, PhD (University of Alberta) Department Head, English and Philosophy. Professor. Comparative literature; postcolonial literatures; Editor, JALA, Journal of the African Literature Association.
Donald Riggs, PhD (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill). Associate Teaching Professor. Cinematic monsters, science fiction and fantasy literature and film.
Donna Rondolone, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Medieval literature; Arthurian legend; first-year writing.
Gail Rosen, JD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Literature and law; first-year writing.
Doreen Alvarez Saar, PhD (SUNY Buffalo) American Literature Editor, Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature. Professor. Early American literature; race and gender studies.
Sheila Sandapen, PhD (Indiana University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Teaching Professor. First-year writing.
Fred A. Siegel, PhD (New York University) Associate Director, First-Year Writing Program. Teaching Professor. Popular theater; dramatic literature, creative non-fiction; first-year writing.
Scott Stein, MFA (University of Miami) Co-Director, Drexel Publishing Group. Associate Teaching Professor. Creative writing; first-year writing; founding editor, When Falls the Coliseum: A Journal of American Culture (Or Lack Thereof).
Elizabeth Thorpe, MFA (Goddard College). Assistant Teaching Professor. New England literature, illness/healing narratives, and the creative process.
Eva Thury, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Professor. Mythology; classical literature; drama; first-year writing; desktop publishing and software documentation.
Kathleen Volk Miller, MA (Rutgers University) Co-Director, Drexel Publishing Group. Associate Teaching Professor. Co-Editor, Painted Bride Quarterly (PBQ); creative writing; first-year writing.
Maria Volynsky, EdD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. English as a Second Language (ESL).
Marshall Warfield, MFA (University of Pittsburgh). Assistant Teaching Professor. Craft of composition and the craft of poetry.
Scott Warnock, PhD (Temple University) Director, Drexel Writing Center. Associate Professor. Rhetoric and composition; medical writing; information technology and literacy.
Robert A. Watts, MA (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Creative writing; first-year writing.
Rachel Wenrick, MFA (Columbia University) Associate Director, Writing Center. Assistant Teaching Professor. First-year writing program.
Vincent Williams, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. First-year writing; the intersection of race, gender, class and urbanism.
Jennifer Yusin, PhD (Emory University). Assistant Professor. Postcolonial literature.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard Astro, PhD (University of Washington) Distinguished Professor. Provost Emeritus. Twentieth-century American literature; literature and sports.
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