The Louis Stein Minor in Judaic Studies

The Louis Stein Minor in Judaic Studies program, housed within the College of Arts and Sciences, is designed to give students the opportunity to explore and understand the history, culture, politics, and religion of the Jewish people. Through interdisciplinary coursework and directed field study, students investigate the Jewish experience from both a contemporary and a historical perspective.

The Louis Stein Minor in Judaic Studies program requires 24.0 credits: 9.0 from required courses, and 15.0 from electives. Students can apply a maximum of 6.0 credits toward the minor from field study under the supervision of the academic advisor.

Required Courses
JUDA 201Jewish Literature and Civilization *3.0
JUDA 202Jewish Life and Culture in Middle Ages **3.0
JUDA 203Modern Jewish History 3.0
Minor electives15.0
Total Credits24.0

*

Offered concurrently with ENGL 350 Jewish Literature and Civilization.

**

Offered concurrently with HIST 253 Jewish Life and Culture in the Middle Ages.

Offered concurrently with HIST 249 Modern Jewish History.

 
Courses offered as electives have included:

Kathleen Carll
Associate Director
Judaic Studies Program
215-895-6388
judaicstudies@drexel.edu

Professor Rakhmiel Peltz
Director of Judaic Studies
215-895-1499
rakhmiel.peltz@drexel.edu

The Judaic Studies Program offices are located in Room 331 of Hagerty Library.

Courses

JUDA 201 Jewish Literature and Civilization 3.0 Credits

This course explores the origins of the Jewish people and their core narratives and beliefs that have become the foundations of Jewish civilization and religion, introducing the first five books of the Torah, the Jewish Bible and analyzing its influence. Major events of the Jewish lifecycle and calendar are examined.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 202 Jewish Life and Culture in Middle Ages 3.0 Credits

This course is an introductory survey of the history of the Jewish people, their civilization, religion and contacts with other cultures in medieval times. Topics will include the rise of Christianity and Islam, the Talmud, Jewish mysticism and the growth of Ashkenazic and Sephardic Jewry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 203 Modern Jewish History 3.0 Credits

This course is an exploration of the social, cultural, political and religious forces that have shaped Jewry the world over from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Topics will include Emancipation and Enlightenment, modern religious movements, socialism, Hebrew and Yiddish literature, the Holocaust, Zionism and the state of Israel.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 211 American Jewish Experience 3.0 Credits

The course explores communal organization of Jews in America from colonial times until today. Topics include westward expansion, urban neighborhoods, American Jewish religion and culture, and Jewish contributions to American culture. The study of this ethno-religious group elucidates historical issues, such as the immigration legacy, minority rights, discrimination, and intermarriage.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 212 Contemporary Jewish Life 3.0 Credits

The course will analyze Jewish social, cultural, and religious activities since the 1970s through four ethnographic community studies and documentary films, aiming to understand the meaning that Jews derive from their beliefs, rituals, and institutions. We will stress identity development over the lifespan and historical issues since the Holocaust and the establishment of the State of Israel.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 213 Jewish Cultural Tapestry 3.0 Credits

The course examines the different customs and traditions of Jews in various parts of the world throughout history. How do minorities develop and maintain their group identity? How have the Jews evolved both diversity and uniformity of practice and ideology? The focus will be on the geography and history of folk traditions: language, religious practice, foodways, dress, and music. The class will examine the phenomenon of diaspora, the dispersion of a people from its homeland, and will analyze the shared religious culture and the parallel, local specific culture.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 214 Language and Cultural Diversity in the USA 3.0 Credits

Starting with research on communication patterns of men and women, moving on to the language diversity of African Americans, and then emphasizing the cultural production of various immigrant groups, the predominance of a rich array of languages and cultures will be shown to pertain to most periods of American history. The Yiddish language-based immigrant culture of American Jews will be treated as a case study, dwelling on the rich Yiddish literature created, as well as language-based cultural institutions, such as the press, theater, radio, klezmer music, and film.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 215 Reconstructing History After Genocide 3.0 Credits

The course explores educational restitution to peoples who are victims of genocide. After conceptualizing the world’s responsibility to maintain its cultures and help victims of genocide to recover their history, the class will compare educational efforts to document life before the destruction in places such as Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia and among Native Americans. Our main focus will be the politics of teaching about Polish Jewry, the largest community of Jews before WW II that was destroyed by the Nazis in the Holocaust. Students will evaluate sources that describe Jewish life in one city, Lublin, Poland.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 216 Yiddish Literature & Culture 3.0 Credits

The course describes the major Jewish culture during the past thousand years. In a lively course stressing the arts and everyday family life, students will be introduced to the multi-faceted Yiddish language and culture. Through study and meetings with community members, students learn how Yiddish both reflects and gives meaning to life. Texts will include English translations of proverbs, folktales, folksongs, prayers, epics, personal diaries, memoirs, drama, films, memorial literature, modern fiction and poetry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

JUDA 280 Special Topics in Judaic Studies 3.0 Credits

In this course, students will explore specific areas not covered in the regularly offered Judaic Studies courses. The course will be taught by teaching faculty members of the Judaic Studies Program, Drexel professors who are members of the Judaic Studies Faculty Committee, or by visiting professors. This is a three-credit elective course for the Louis Stein Judaic Studies Minor. It may also be used as a free elective course for a variety of students.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

JUDA 298 Field Work in Judaic Studies 3.0 Credits

In this course, students will do independent fieldwork within a Jewish communal organization in the USA or abroad, or ethnographic or archeological fieldwork. The plan of the work, weekly time commitment, and periodic reports will be agreed upon in advance by the student and Professor Peltz, Director of Judaic Studies, or another Drexel Judaic Studies faculty member. This is a three-credit elective course for the Louis Stein Judaic Studies Minor. It may also be used as a free elective course for a variety of students.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

JUDA 299 Independent Study in Judaic Studies 3.0 Credits

In this course, students will work under the direction of the director of the Judaic Studies program, one of the Judaic Studies teaching faculty members, or a member of the Judaic Studies Faculty Committee. The subject matter will cover a specific research area in Judaic Studies or an area of academic study not offered in an existing Judaic Studies course. Only students with sufficient background work will be accepted by the faculty member for independent work. This is a three-credit elective course for the Louis Stein Judaic Studies Minor. It may also be used as a free elective course for a variety of students.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits

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