Philosophy

Bachelor of Arts Degree: 182.0 - 188.0 credits

About the Program

The work of philosophers and philosophically-trained researchers is aimed at questioning and illuminating the issues, principles, concepts, and problems that organize our lives and fields of endeavor so as to give rise to a more subtle, precise, and interesting sense of their meaning, their prospects, and their limitations. Although philosophy is correctly identified with asking life’s big questions, like:  “What is reality?”, “What is goodness?”, “What is beauty?”, “What is truth?”, most philosophers work on concrete, well-focused questions that emerge from all areas of life and work: social and natural scientific research, health care, the law, criminal justice, engineering, public policy, the arts, sports, business, etc. Drexel's philosophy faculty conduct research that is uniquely engaged in real-world issues and the kinds of problems that emerge from life and work in politics, law, health care, literature and every area of scientific and humanistic research. They are widely-published in some of the finest research journals in the field, and are deeply engaged in specialized work in the discipline.
 

In the broadest sense, philosophical study is intended to stimulate, provoke, and encourage the student to think for himself or herself, and its real value lies in what it helps to illuminate about life and experience. But the study of philosophy benefits students and serves society in more tangible ways too. A philosophy major won’t guarantee you a job—no major will—but no major will prepare you for success in as wide a range and variety of fields as philosophy will. This is because philosophy classes help you develop the skills and abilities that are fundamental to success in any worthwhile career. Among many other things, philosophical study helps you develop your ability and inclination to think for yourself, to reflect upon complex situations and circumstances, to tell the difference between good and bad arguments, and to write and speak clearly and coherently.

 

It is no coincidence that assessments of critical, logical, and dialogical abilities are featured prominently in exams like the GRE, GMAT, LSAT and MCAT, which are designed to gauge one’s likelihood of success in graduate study or the pursuit of careers in law, business, and medicine. In this respect, a philosophy major prepares the student uniquely well for success in the widest range of fields. And since the philosophy major at Drexel reserves a full 48.0 credit hours for free electives, it is particularly suitable as a double major that can broaden, deepen, and enhance the student’s educational experience, preparation for various non-academic careers, and preparation for life.

 

Most students who choose philosophy as a major pursue careers in which thoughtful, logical, reasonable, creative persons are needed. Another large group are looking toward careers in the legal profession or graduate study in fields related to philosophy, like critical media studies, or public policy. A further group of philosophy majors pursue academic careers in philosophy by eventually getting an MA or PhD. At Drexel, our philosophy program is a great first step for the student who is interested in pursuing any of these paths. Alongside our major, (BA), program, we offer two certificate programs, (18 credits each), and a minor, (24 credits).

Drexel philosophy majors take our introduction to Western Philosophy class, two logic classes and a 200-level ethics class during the first year of the program. In the second year, majors take the history of philosophy sequence, (three classes), a 200-level logic class, foundational classes in metaphysics and epistemology, and a 300-level applied ethics class. In the third year, along with aesthetics and philosophy of science, majors begin taking seminar classes, which are discussion-driven, reading and writing intensive classes which meet in small groups. Philosophy majors take at least five seminars, usually during their junior and senior years. As seniors, majors embark upon a year-long, self-designed research and writing project, culminating in the defense of a Senior Thesis before the program's faculty and other majors. This jointly-designed project consists of three one-on-one tutorials with a faculty member of the student’s choosing.

Additional Information

For more information about the Drexel philosophy program, please visit the Department of English & Philosophy website or drop by to see our director anytime. The Department of English and Philosophy is located in MacAlister Hall, room 5044. You can contact the director directly at:

Dr. Peter Amato
Director of Programs in Philosophy
Department of English and Philosophy

MacAlister 5030, phone 215-895-1353

 

Degree Requirements 

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
CHEM 201Why Things Work: Everyday Chemistry3.0
MATH 101Introduction to Analysis I *4.0
MATH 102Introduction to Analysis II **4.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
PHYS 135How Things Work4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience3.0
Two Studies in Diversity Electives 6.0
Two International Studies Electives6.0-8.0
Four Social and Behavioral Sciences Electives12.0-16.0
Select two of the following:6.0
History of Art I: Ancient to Medieval
History of Art II: High Renaissance to Modern
History of Art- Early to Late Modern
Language Requirement
201 Language Course 4.0
202 Language Course4.0
Major Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy (College requirements state students can select PHIL 101 or PHIL 102, but the major requires PHIL 101.)3.0
PHIL 111Propositional Logic3.0
PHIL 207Predicate Logic3.0
PHIL 211Metaphysics3.0
PHIL 221Epistemology3.0
PHIL 212Ancient Philosophy3.0
PHIL 214Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 215Contemporary Philosophy3.0
PHIL 231Aesthetics3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
PHIL 361Philosophy of Science3.0
PHIL 431 [WI] Seminar in Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 481 [WI] Seminar in a Philosophical School 3.0
PHIL 485 [WI] Seminar in a Major Philosopher 3.0
PHIL 497 [WI] Senior Essay I: Research & Thesis3.0
PHIL 498 [WI] Senior Essay II: Argument Construction3.0
PHIL 499 [WI] Senior Essay III: Defense3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Philosophy of Social Sciences
Philosophy of Religion
Select one of the following:3.0
Seminar in Medieval Philosophy
Seminar in Ancient Philosophy
Select one of the following:3.0
Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy
Seminar in American Philosophy
Professional Ethics Elective
Select one of the following:3.0
Business Ethics
Communication Ethics
Computer Ethics
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
Global Ethical Issues
Electives
Free Electives48.0
Total Credits182.0-188.0

*

Credit will be granted to students who achieve Advanced Placement (AP) in relevant mathematical disciplines. On the other hand, students unprepared for MATH 101 should take MATH 100 Fundamentals of Mathematics.

**

Students who took MATH 100 in Term 1 must take MATH 101 in Term 2, and MATH 102 in Term 3 or Term 4.

Presupposes a level of success in the placement examination warranting enrollment at this language level. Students are encouraged to pursue language instruction in “the languages of Western Philosophy;” thus, French, German, Italian and Spanish would be recommended. However, pursuit of proficiency in languages other than those recommended would not be discouraged. Credit will be granted to students who achieve Advanced Placement (AP) in a language.

This course may be repeated for credit.



Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 101Introduction to Analysis I4.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Language 201*4.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
MATH 102Introduction to Analysis II4.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Language 202 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 3
CHEM 201Why Things Work: Everyday Chemistry3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PHIL 111Propositional Logic3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
Social science elective 3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 4
PHIL 207Predicate Logic3.0
ARTH 102
or 101
History of Art II: High Renaissance to Modern
History of Art I: Ancient to Medieval
3.0
PHIL 212Ancient Philosophy3.0
Social science elective 3.0-4.0
Diversity studies elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 5
PHIL 211Metaphysics3.0
PHYS 135How Things Work4.0
PHIL 214Modern Philosophy3.0
ARTH 103
or 102
History of Art- Early to Late Modern
History of Art II: High Renaissance to Modern
3.0
Diversity studies elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
PHIL 215Contemporary Philosophy3.0
PHIL 221Epistemology3.0
Social science elective 3.0-4.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 7
PHIL 231Aesthetics3.0
Social science elective 3.0-4.0
Professional ethics elective*3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 8
PHIL 361Philosophy of Science3.0
PHIL 481 [WI] Seminar in a Philosophical School3.0
International studies elective 3.0-4.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 9
PHIL 485 [WI] Seminar in a Major Philosopher3.0
International Studies Elective 3.0-4.0
Free Electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 10
PHIL 497 [WI] Senior Essay I: Research & Thesis3.0
PHIL 425 [WI]
or 421 [WI]
Seminar in Medieval Philosophy
Seminar in Ancient Philosophy
3.0
PHIL 391
or 371
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy of Social Sciences
3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
PHIL 431 [WI] Seminar in Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 498 [WI] Senior Essay II: Argument Construction3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
PHIL 499 [WI] Senior Essay III: Defense3.0
PHIL 465 [WI]
or 461 [WI]
Seminar in American Philosophy
Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy
3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Total Credit: 182.0-188.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.

 

Minor in Philosophy

This minor is intended for undergraduates seeking to broaden and enhance their education by attaining a firm grounding in philosophy. The minor requires seven carefully-selected classes, plus one of the senior seminars. Students who have completed 30.0 credits may apply for the philosophy minor by submitting the Application for Admission to Minor Program form, available online at the Student Resource Center website.

Required Courses
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PHIL 211Metaphysics3.0
PHIL 221Epistemology3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Critical Reasoning
Propositional Logic
Select one of the following Professional Ethics courses:3.0
Business Ethics
Communication Ethics
Computer Ethics
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
Global Ethical Issues
Select one of the following:3.0
Aesthetics
Social & Political Philos
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Medicine
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Social Sciences
Philosophy in Literature
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Select one of the following:3.0
Seminar in Ancient Philosophy
Seminar in Medieval Philosophy
Seminar in Modern Philosophy
Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy
Total Credits24.0

Courses

PHIL 101 Introduction to Western Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Introduces the main methods and aims of Western Philosophy, involving the study of problems central to metaphysics, theory of knowledge, and ethics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 102 Introduction to Eastern Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the main topics of study in Buddhist, Hindu and other systems of Eastern thought.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 105 Critical Reasoning 3.0 Credits

Introduces and develops the skills involved in reasoning effectively about experience, and being able to distinguish strong arguments form weak ones.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 107 Philosophy and Knowledge Organization 3.0 Credits

This course imparts knowledge and skills associated with organizing concepts. The context for the course is the history of knowledge organization, viewed philosophically, with special emphasis on the Platonic, Cartesian, Kantian, Comtean and Digital paradigms. Students will learn to recognize the classical principles of knowledge organization and how to apply them using a "logic of concepts." Students will also come to understand how and why knowledge is organized the way it is in the modern university.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 111 Propositional (zero-order) Logic 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of symbolic logic: argument, validity, soundness, provability, completeness, consistency, decidability, entailment, logical equivalence, logical truth, logical contradiction. Covers truth-functional connectives, rules of formation and translation, and rules of inference. Proof techniques studies include natural deduction, truth-tables, and/or truth-trees.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 207 Predicate (first-order) Logic 3.0 Credits

Concentrates on syntax and semantics of quantification. Formation principles include A, E, I, and O statements (and square of opposition), domain of discourse, quantifier scope, multiple quantification, relations, and identity. Proof mechanics covered include natural deduction, instantiation, semantic tableau, and possible-world counterexamples. Also explored are the completeness, consistency, and decidability of first-order systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PHIL 111 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 210 Philosophy of Sport 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about philosophical issues arising in sport, in areas including its personal, social, aesthetic, and political dimensions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore

PHIL 211 Metaphysics 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about the nature of reality and philosophical issues such as the nature of time, mind, personal identity, and free will.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 212 Ancient Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Studies central works that have shaped Western Philosophy and culture from the Ancient Greek era and its legacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 214 Modern Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Studies central works that have shaped Western Philosophy and culture from the Renaissance through the late Nineteenth Century.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 215 Contemporary Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Studies central works that have had important impacts upon Western Philosophy and culture from the Twentieth Century through the present.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 216 Philosophy of Time 3.0 Credits

In this course we will study philosophical problems surrounding the nature of time. We will consider questions like, "Does the present exist?"; "Does time have a direction?"; "Are events pre-determined?"; "Is time travel possible?"; etc. Students will read and discuss treatments of these issues in philosophy, literature, and film.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 221 Epistemology 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about knowledge that bear upon philosophical issues concerned with the nature and status of knowledge claims as expressed in concepts like belief, truth, and justification.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 231 Aesthetics 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about art and the nature of beauty that bear on philosophical issues concerned with artistic production, performance, and perception, such as arise in activities like painting, sculpture, film literature, music, and dance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 241 Social & Political Philos 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about human social and political life that bear on philosophical issues such as the nature and scope of justice, the legitimacy of states, and the relationship between democracy, civil rights, and civil disobedience.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 251 Ethics 3.0 Credits

Studies theories about human conduct which bear upon the rightness and wrongness of actions, and the goodness and badness of ends, including the nature, scope, purposes, and varieties of moral and ethical theories.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 255 Philosophy of Sex & Love 3.0 Credits

This course investigates sexual activity and desire, and the morality of sexual behavior. It also examines various types of love and their links with sexuality. Figures studied include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Kierkegaard, Freud and Foucault. Topics include marriage, prostitution, pornography, homosexuality, perversion, rape, intentionality, irreplaceability, unconditionality, reciprocity, and exclusivity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PHIL 301 Business Ethics 3.0 Credits

Study of such moral issues as truth-telling, puffery, and lying in business communications; employer-employee relations; obligations to customers; obligations to foreign populations; and government contracts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 305 Communication Ethics 3.0 Credits

Ethical analysis of current laws and legislation aimed at regulating speech in the context of mass communications (radio, television and film).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 311 Computer Ethics 3.0 Credits

Ethical analyses of current laws and pending legislation aimed at regulating computer use as well as Internet practices and content.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 315 Engineering Ethics 3.0 Credits

Provides critical reflection on the nature of engineering and technology and on the ethical obligations and responsibilities unique to the engineering profession. Topics include the social responsibilities of engineering, the nature of professionalism, professional autonomy, whistleblowing, conflicts of interest, organizational (dis)obedience, the ethics of risk assessment, and the place and purpose of engineering codes of ethics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if major is BUSN or major is ECON or classification is Freshman or Sophomore

PHIL 317 Ethics and Design Professions 3.0 Credits

Examines ethical theories and their application to architecture; the ethics of architectural space and place; the logic of ethical reasoning applied to the practice of architecture; professional ethics and the social responsibility of architects; the ethics of safety and risk in the production of architectural structures; sustainable environmental architectural design.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is ARCH or major is INTR.

PHIL 321 Biomedical Ethics 3.0 Credits

Studies moral issues related to health and disease, patients' rights and professional responsibilities, informed consent, abortion, euthanasia, and biomedical research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 322 Ethics of Human Enhancement 3.0 Credits

Discussion of developments in health-care with the potential not only to treat disease, but also to improve human performance and cosmetically change the human body, thereby creating ethical considerations about the nature of health and disease and the proper scope and goals of health care.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: HSAD 210 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 323 Organizational Ethics 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the application of ethical theories and principles to organizational systems and decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on how ethical principles affect and are applied to organizational policy-making, leadership behavior, systems of communication, technology use, and other systems of organization.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.

PHIL 325 Ethics in Sports Management 3.0 Credits

An introduction to various ethical issues in sports and sports management, such as leadership and coaching; gender and racial equity in sports; fair play and cheating; violence and competition; commercialization of sports; the relation of sports to cultural value systems; ethics of technology and sports performance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore

PHIL 330 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

Studies ethical issues in the policies and practices of criminal justice, and theories that bear upon issues such as the relationship of law to justice, the definition of crime, the use of deception and coercion in law enforcement, and the purposes and varieties of criminal punishment.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 335 Global Ethical Issues 3.0 Credits

Offers an introduction to the ethical tensions of our age, globally construed. May address such issues as terrorism, genocide, religious exclusivism, nuclear proliferation, the regulation of the Internet, as well as culturally competing notions of right and wrong, and good and bad.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 341 Philosophy of the Environment 3.0 Credits

Studies ecological issues from a philosophical standpoint stressing the implications of scientific and technological developments as they affect people's lives and choices.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 351 Philosophy of Technology 3.0 Credits

Studies technology from a philosophical standpoint stressing its role in shaping human existence and values, considering issues such as the control and distribution of information, housing and city planning, automation, and the uses of technology in medicine.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 355 Philosophy of Medicine 3.0 Credits

Examines the ideas of medicine, disease, and health from a philosophical perspective. Examines such concepts as gender, mental-illness, mind-body unity, aging and physical perfection as derived from both Eastern and Western traditions. Current health policy alternative treatment practices are also discussed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 102 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 361 Philosophy of Science 3.0 Credits

Studies natural scientific theory-construction and investigative methods from a philosophical standpoint, considering issues such as the nature and scope of experimental method, and the history and justification of theory change.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 371 Philosophy of Social Sciences 3.0 Credits

Studies social scientific theory-construction and investigative methods from a philosophical standpoint, considering issues such as the distinction between explanation and interpretation, and the history and justification of theory change.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 381 [WI] Philosophy in Literature 3.0 Credits

Studies philosophical issues such as the concept of the self, the nature and course of evil, the nature and scope of free will, and ideals in living as they appear in significant works of literature.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PHIL 385 Philosophy of Law 3.0 Credits

This course addresses philosophical issues in the law. Topics include the meaning of "law," the nature and logic of legal (in contrast to moral) concepts and principles, and competing conceptions of law (Natural Law, Positivism, Realism, Rights-Based, etc.). Authors may include Plato, Mill, Rawls, Hart, Dworkin and others.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 102 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 391 Philosophy of Religion 3.0 Credits

Studies various aspects of religious belief and experience from a philosophical standpoint, considering issues such as the definition and existence of God, the nature and course of evil, and the relationship between faith and reason in a religious life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 101 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 395 Advanced Topics in Logic 3.0 Credits

Specialized topics, from among: self-reference paradoxes, set theory, axiomatization of arithmetic, computability, Church-Turing thesis, Gödel's theorem, minds and machines, Turing test, artificial intelligence, definitions of truth, models and satisfaction, analyticity, syntax/semantics, ontological commitment, intention/extension, reference justifying deduction, nominalism/realism, multi-valued logic, intuitionism, modal logic, doxastic logic, and logic of moral discourse.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PHIL 111 [Min Grade: D] and PHIL 207 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 399 Independent Project in Philosophy 1.0-12.0 Credit

Provides directed reading and writing in philosophy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 2 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PHIL 421 [WI] Seminar in Ancient Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Advanced study and discussion of the works of the leading philosophers and philosophical schools of Western antiquity. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 425 [WI] Seminar in Medieval Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Advanced study and discussion of the works of the leading philosophers and philosophical schools of the Medieval period. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 431 [WI] Seminar in Rationalism & Empiricism 3.0 Credits

Advanced study and discussion of the works of the leading philosophers and philosophical schools of the Modern period (circa. 1500 A.D. to 1900 A.D.) on the European Continent and British Isles. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 461 [WI] Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Advanced study and discussion of the works by leading philosophers from 1900 to present. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 465 [WI] Seminar in American Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Advanced study and discussion of works by leading American philosophers, including Peirce, James, Mead, Royce, C.I. Lewis, Quine, Davidson, Rorty and others. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 475 Special Problems in Philosophy 3.0 Credits

Topic for each term to be announced. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore

PHIL 481 [WI] Seminar in a Philosophical School 3.0 Credits

Development of doctrines, theories, arguments and problems associated with one or more philosophical schools (or movements). Schools (or movements) may include Pythagoreanism, Platonism, Epicureanism, or recently, Positivism, Pragmatism, and Existentialism. This course is Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 485 [WI] Seminar in a Major Philosopher 3.0 Credits

Study of the works of a major philosopher such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, etc. Reading and Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 3 times for 9 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: (PHIL 211 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 212 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 214 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 215 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHIL 221 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 231 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 241 [Min Grade: D] or PHIL 251 [Min Grade: D])

PHIL 497 [WI] Senior Essay I: Research & Thesis 3.0 Credits

Individual supervision. Selection of research topic for the senior argumentative essay; collection and analysis of hard-copy and electronic research material; construction of bibliography. Initial thesis formulation and drafting of argument sketch. Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PHIL and classification is Senior.

PHIL 498 [WI] Senior Essay II: Argument Construction 3.0 Credits

Supervised construction of the main and supporting arguments of the senior essay involving drafting and re-drafting of the prose statement. Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PHIL and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PHIL 497 [Min Grade: D]

PHIL 499 [WI] Senior Essay III: Defense 3.0 Credits

Individual Supervision. Defense of the senior essay thesis before the philosophy faculty and fellow senior philosophy majors. Written replies to main criticisms as determined by the faculty supervisor. Final submission of senior essay. Writing Intensive.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PHIL and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PHIL 498 [Min Grade: D]

Philosophy Faculty

Stacey Ake, PhD, (Pennsylvania State University) Co-Director, Certificate Program in Medical Humanities. Associate Teaching Professor. Ethics, semiotics, existentialism
Peter Amato, PhD (Fordham University) Director, Philosophy. Associate Teaching Professor. Ethics, Marxism, Continental philosophy.
Jacques N. Catudal, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. Epistemology, aesthetics, philosophy of religion.
Nathan Hanna, PhD (Syracuse University). Assistant Professor. Ethics; philosophy of law; political philosophy.
Sarah Hansen, PhD (Vanderbilt University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Continental philosophy, feminist theory, and bioethics.
Carol Mele, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Ethics, medical ethics, critical reasoning.
Flavia Padovani, PhD (University of Geneva). Assistant Professor. History and philosophy of science, philosophy of science, epistemology, logic.
Marilyn Gaye Piety, PhD (McGill University). Associate Professor. History of philosophy, philosophy of religion, critical reasoning, Kierkegaard.
Andrew Smith, PhD (SUNY, Stony Brook) Associate Director, Philosophy. Assistant Professor. Social and political philosophy, ethics, American philosophy.
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