Philosophy, Politics and Economics

Major: Philosophy, Politics and Economics
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 190.0
Co-op Options: No Co-op (Four years); One Co-op (Four years); Three Co-op (Five years)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 45.1004
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code: 25-1065

About the Program

Drexel University’s BA degree Philosophy, Politics & Economics, or PPE as it is often called, exemplifies Drexel’s commitment to comprehensive education at the intersection of thought and practice. A joint endeavor of the School of Economics, the Department of Politics, and the Department of English & Philosophy, the BA in PPE provides a multidisciplinary foundation for professionals and researchers who want to address the complex, interconnected challenges of contemporary life. It prepares students for a wide variety of excellent careers that require thoughtful analysis and engaged leadership including, but not limited to, public service, government, international and domestic business, law, community organizing, publishing, journalism, education, academic research, and more.

PPE began in the early 20th century at Oxford University in the United Kingdom in an effort to ensure that scholars were ready to apply their learning in practical, governmental, and business contexts to become leaders and change agents. Historically, political science and economics descend from what had been called “political economy.” PPE acknowledges what is often lost in the separation and specialization of these fields—the political wisdom that understands economic imperatives and the economic intelligence that recognizes the limits of political initiative. The philosophical dimension of PPE represents the vital reflective and critical aspects that are essential to bringing political and economic insights into conversation for understanding and leadership. PPE is devoted to the idea that great learning should inspire and empower students to have an impact on the world.

Students in the Drexel BA in PPE begin with the interdisciplinary class PPE 101 Introduction to Philosophy, Politics and Economics, which presents the field through a discussion of how the aims and methods of the three constitutive disciplines work together and discussion of the political, economic, and philosophical dimensions of specific topics and themes. The Philosophy classes in the major are mainly focused on issues in ethics, logic, philosophy of law, and social and political philosophy. The Politics classes cover a variety of subjects and constitute a solid foundation in political science covering topics that include comparative politics, history of political thought, qualitative or quantitative research methods, theories of justice, American foreign policy, social protest movements in comparative perspective, and more. The Economics classes are designed to give the student a foundation for profound analysis and insight. These include microeconomics, macroeconomics, economic ideas, public finance, and electives chosen from courses which include Game Theory and Applications, Economics of Small Business, Labor Economics, Comparative Economic Systems, Resource and Environmental Economics, and more.

PPE majors also take electives in Sociology, choosing from courses like Race, Ethnicity and Social Inequality, Wealth and Power, Gender and Society, Development and Underdevelopment in the Global South, Environmental Justice, and more. In the interactive seminar capstone course PPE 450, students work with an instructor as they formulate, evaluate, and criticize public policy proposals, research, and/or theoretical perspectives on political and economic issues using the research tools, arguments, and methods drawn from the three fields. PPE majors at Drexel have access to the widest range of co-op positions related to public service, government, international and domestic business, law, community organizing, education, publishing, journalism, academic research, and many more areas.

Admission Requirements

The interdisciplinary Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) program exemplifies Drexel's commitment to comprehensive education at the intersection of thought and practice. A joint endeavor of the School of Economics, the Department of Politics, and the Department of English and Philosophy, the BA in PPE provides a multidisciplinary foundation for professionals who will address the complex, interconnected challenges of contemporary life. It prepares students for careers that require careful analysis, clear foresight, and thoughtful leadership: government, politics, law, public policy, public service, and business. Our program starts from the idea that the economy is fundamentally political, politics are fundamentally economic, and both are shaped by centuries of philosophical inquiry. We build on a foundation of rigorous philosophical thought, political and economic theory, and applied research skills.

Degree Requirements

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements:
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
COOP 101Career Management and Professional Development *1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
or ENGL 111 English Composition I
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
or ENGL 112 English Composition II
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
or ENGL 113 English Composition III
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two Studies in Diversity classes6.0
Two International Studies classes6.0
Two Natural Science classes6.0
A Mathematics sequence of at least two classes in either Analysis or Calculus **8.0
Two Social and Behavioral Science classes6.0
Two Arts & Humanities classes ***6.0
Two classes in one Foreign Language completing level 103 8.0
Free Electives25.0
Major Requirements:
PPE 101Introduction to Philosophy, Politics and Economics3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PSCI 110American Government4.0
or PSCI 140 Comparative Politics I
or PSCI 150 International Politics
PHIL 111Symbolic Logic I3.0
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
One of these Political Science Methods classes:4.0
Qualitative and Mixed-Methods Research in Political Science
Quantitative Research Methods in Political Science
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics4.0
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics4.0
ECON 326 [WI] Economic Ideas4.0
PHIL 121Symbolic Logic II3.0
PHIL 241Social & Political Philosophy3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
Two of these Political Science Area classes:8.0
American Political Development
Theories of Justice
American Foreign Policy
Global Governance
Power in Protest: Social Movements in Comparative Perspective
Two of these Sociology Elective classes:8.0
Race, Ethnicity and Social Inequality
Wealth and Power
Gender and Society
Development and Underdevelopment in the Global South
Environmental Justice
Three of these Economics / International Business Elective classes: ††12.0
Survey of Economic Policy
Up to three ECON classes numbered 250 and higher
International Trade
International Money and Finance
ECON 334Public Finance4.0
SOC 355 [WI] Classical Social Theory4.0
SOC 356 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory 4.0
PHIL 385Philosophy of Law3.0
Any two Political Science 300 and/or 400-level classes8.0
Any two Philosophy 400-level classes6.0
PPE 450Senior Seminar in Philosophy, Politics and Economics4.0
Total Credits190.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Program. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term.

Sample Plan of Study

4 year, no co-op

First Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ENGL 101 or 1113.0CIVC 1011.0ENGL 103 or 1133.0VACATION
PPE 1013.0ENGL 102 or 1123.0PHIL 1053.0 
UNIV H1011.0PSCI 1204.0Diversity Studies course3.0 
Foreign Language course4.0Foreign Language course4.0Natural Science course3.0 
Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Arts & Humanities elective3.0 
 15 16 15 0
Second Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ECON 2014.0ECON 2024.0ECON 3264.0VACATION
PHIL 1013.0PHIL 1213.0PHIL 2413.0 
PHIL 1113.0PSCI 1104.0PSCI 231 or 2324.0 
Natural Science course3.0Social & Behavioral Science course3.0Diversity Studies course3.0 
Arts & Humanities elective3.0Free elective3.0Free elective4.0 
 16 17 18 0
Third Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
SOC 2104.0PHIL 2513.0ECON 3344.0VACATION
UNIV H2011.0SOC 2304.0PSCI 2104.0 
Social & Behavioral Science course3.0International Studies course3.0International Studies course3.0 
Free electives9.0Free electives6.0Free electives4.0 
 17 16 15 0
Fourth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits 
ECON 3614.0ECON 3014.0PPE 4504.0 
PSCI 2524.0PHIL 3853.0ECON 250-level or higher elective4.0 
SOC 3554.0SOC 3564.0PHIL 400-level elective3.0 
PHIL 400-level elective3.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0 
 15 15 15 
Total Credits 190

4 year, 1 co-op

First Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ENGL 101 or 1113.0CIVC 1011.0ENGL 103 or 1133.0VACATION
PPE 1013.0ENGL 102 or 1123.0PHIL 1053.0 
UNIV H1011.0PSCI 1204.0Diversity Studies course3.0 
Foreign Language course4.0Foreign Language course4.0Natural Science course3.0 
Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Arts & Humanities elective3.0 
 15 16 15 0
Second Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ECON 2014.0ECON 2024.0COOP 101*1.0SOC 2104.0
PHIL 1013.0PHIL 1213.0ECON 3264.0UNIV H2011.0
PHIL 1113.0PSCI 1104.0PHIL 2413.0Social & Behavioral Science course3.0
Natural Science course3.0Social & Behavioral Science course3.0PSCI 231 or 2324.0Free electives9.0
Arts & Humanities elective3.0Free elective3.0Diversity Studies course3.0 
  Free elective3.0 
 16 17 18 17
Third Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
PHIL 2513.0ECON 3344.0COOP EXPERIENCECOOP EXPERIENCE
SOC 2304.0PSCI 2104.0  
International Studies course3.0International Studies course3.0  
Free electives6.0Free electives4.0  
 16 15 0 0
Fourth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits 
ECON 3614.0ECON 3014.0PPE 4504.0 
PSCI 2524.0PHIL 3853.0ECON 250-level or higher elective4.0 
SOC 3554.0SOC 3564.0PHIL 400-level elective3.0 
PHIL 400-level elective3.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0 
 15 15 15 
Total Credits 190

5 year, 3 co-op

First Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ENGL 1013.0CIVC 1011.0COOP 101*1.0VACATION
PPE 1013.0ENGL 102 or 1123.0ENGL 103 or 1133.0 
UNIV H1011.0PSCI 1204.0PHIL 1053.0 
Foreign Language class4.0Foreign Language class4.0Diversity Studies course3.0 
Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Math Analysis or Calculus4.0Natural Science course3.0 
  Arts & Humanities elective3.0 
 15 16 16 0
Second Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ECON 2014.0ECON 2024.0COOP EXPERIENCECOOP EXPERIENCE
PHIL 1013.0PHIL 1213.0  
PHIL 1113.0PSCI 1104.0  
Natural Science course3.0Social & Behavioral Science course3.0  
Arts & Humanities elective3.0Free elective3.0  
 16 17 0 0
Third Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ECON 3264.0SOC 2104.0COOP EXPERIENCECOOP EXPERIENCE
PHIL 2413.0UNIV H2011.0  
PSCI 231 or 2324.0Social & Behavioral Science course3.0  
Diversity Studies course3.0Free electives9.0  
Free elective3.0   
 17 17 0 0
Fourth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
PHIL 2513.0ECON 3344.0COOP EXPERIENCECOOP EXPERIENCE
SOC 2304.0PSCI 2104.0  
International Studies course3.0International Studies course3.0  
Free electives6.0Free electives4.0  
 16 15 0 0
Fifth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits 
ECON 3614.0ECON 3014.0PPE 4504.0 
PSCI 2524.0PHIL 3853.0ECON 250-level or higher elective4.0 
SOC 3554.0SOC 3564.0PHIL 400-level elective3.0 
PHIL 400-level elective3.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0PSCI 300-level or higher elective4.0 
 15 15 15 
Total Credits 190

Affiliated Faculty

Peter Amato, PhD (Fordham University) Teaching Professor of Philosophy. Ethics, Marxism, Continental Philosophy

Debjani Bhattacharyya, PhD (Emory University) Assistant Professor of History. South Asia, Environmental History, Global History

Sebastien Bradley, PhD (University of Michigan) Associate Professor of Economics. Public Economics, Real Estate. Applied Econometrics

Zoltán Búzás, PhD (The Ohio State University) Assistant Professor of Politics. International Norms, Human Rights, Race and Ethnicity in International Politics

Erin Graham, PhD (The Ohio State University) Associate Professor of Politics. International Organization, Institutional Design and Development, Climate Change

Nathan Hanna, PhD (Syracuse University) Associate Professor of Philosophy. Ethics, Philosophy of Law, Philosophy of Punishment

Amelia Hoover Green, PhD (Yale University) Associate Professor of Politics. Armed Conflict, Political Violence, Empirical Research Methods

Roger A. McCain, PhD (Louisiana State University) Professor of Economics. History of Economic Ideas, Welfare Economics, Game Theory

Carol Mele, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Associate Teaching Professor of Philosophy. Ethical Theory, Social and Political Philosophy, Rawls

Joel E. Oestreich, PhD (Brown University) Professor of Politics and Global Studies. Human Rights, Economic Development, International Relations Theory

Maria Olivero, PhD (Duke University) Associate Professor of Economics. Open Economy Macroeconomics, Monetary Economics, Quantitative Methods

Flavia Padovani, PhD (University of Geneva) Associate Professor of Philosophy. History and Philosphy of Science, Epistemology, Logic.

Rachel Reynolds, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago) Associate Professor of Communication. Language and Linguistics. Immigration, African Studies

Andrew Smith, PhD (SUNY, Stony Brook) Associate Professor of Philosophy. Environmental Philosophy, Social and Political Philosophy, American Philosophy

José A. Tapia, MBBCH, MPH, PhD (New School for Social Research) Associate Professor of Politics. Climate Change, Social Development, Economic Effects on Health

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