Political Science

Bachelor of Arts Degree: 182.0 quarter credits
Bachelor of Science Degree: 182.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The political science program in the Department of History & Politics helps students cultivate perspective, develop critical thinking and communication skills, and understand the economic, social, and political systems within which we live and work. This flexible program allows students to shape a curriculum that meets their needs, whether they are preparing for the business world, graduate school in political science, an MBA or other business program, or law school.

Degrees Offered

The department offers both a Bachelor of Science (BS) and a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in political science. Students may choose the program that best fits their needs and future goals.

The Bachelor of Science (BS) provides a framework for those students who prefer specific course requirements, including sequences in mathematics and the natural sciences.

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) provides a more flexible course of study, which includes foreign language and allows for options in the fulfillment of humanities, social science, math, and science requirements.

Whether they are preparing to enter law school, the business world, or graduate school, students can shape a curriculum that meets their needs.

In addition, the department also offers minors in American StudiesEuropean Studies, HistoryScience, Technology and Human Affairs, Politics, and World History and Politics.

Degree Requirements (BA) 

General Education Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Two Math courses6.0-8.0
Two Science courses *6.0-8.0
Foundation Requirements
Two Studies in Diversity electives6.0
Two Consecutive Foreign Language courses (must complete level 201)8.0
Four Humanities/Fine Arts electives12.0
Four Social Science electives12.0
Two International Studies electives6.0
Core Political Science Requirements
PSCI 110American Government I4.0
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
PSCI 130Research Methods in Political Science I4.0
PSCI 140Introduction to Comparative Political Analysis4.0
PSCI 150International Politics4.0
PSCI 211American Government II4.0
PSCI 220Constitutional Law I3.0
PSCI 230Research Methods in Political Science II4.0
PSCI 240Comparative Government3.0
PSCI 250American Foreign Policy3.0
PSCI 270Problems of Individual Liberty and Government Authority3.0
Three History electives **9.0
Political Science Electives ***30.0
Free Electives33.0-37.0
Total Credits182.0

*

Any Biology (BIO), Chemisitry (CHEM), Nutrition (NFS), Physics (PHYS) or Environmental Science (ENVS) course.

**

Only 200-level and above HIST courses will fulfill this requirement.

***

Only 300-level and above PSCI courses will fulfill this this requirement.


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study (BA)

 

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSCI 110American Government I4.0
PSCI 150International Politics4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Foreign Language course (103-level or higher) 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
PSCI 140Introduction to Comparative Political Analysis4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Foreign Language course (201-level or higher) 4.0
Mathematics course 3.0-4.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective 3.0
 Term Credits19.0-20.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
PSCI 130Research Methods in Political Science I4.0
Mathematics course 3.0-4.0
Free elective 2.0
 Term Credits16.0-17.0
Term 4
PSCI 230Research Methods in Political Science II4.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
Humanities/Fine Arts elective 3.0
Diversity Studies elective 3.0
Science elective*3.0-4.0
 Term Credits16.0-17.0
Term 5
PSCI 240Comparative Government3.0
Political Science elective (300-level and above PSCI course) 3.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
Humanities/Fine Arts elective 3.0
Science elective *3.0-4.0
Free elective 2.0-3.0
 Term Credits17.0-19.0
Term 6
PSCI 211American Government II4.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
International Studies elective 3.0
Diversity Studies elective 3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
PSCI 220Constitutional Law I3.0
International Studies elective 3.0
Humanities/Fine Arts elective 3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
PSCI 250American Foreign Policy3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences elective 3.0
Humanities/Fine Arts elective 3.0
Political Science elective (300-level and above PSCI course) 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
PSCI 270Problems of Individual Liberty and Government Authority3.0
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 5.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 10
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Term 12
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 183.0-188.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.



Degree Requirements (BS) 

General Education Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Math Sequence *8.0
Select one of the following:
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Science Sequence **8.0
Select one of the following:
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics Sequence
General Physics I
General Physics II
Literature
Nonwestern Literature Requirement
Select one of the following:3.0
Post-Colonial Literature I
Post-Colonial Literature II
Western Literature Requirement
Select one of the following:3.0
Classical to Medieval Literature
Renaissance to the Enlightenment
Romanticism to Modernism
American Literature I
American Literature II
African American Literature
British Literature I
British Literature II
Additional General Requirements
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
or ANTH 110 Human Past: Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics4.0
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics4.0
MUSC 130Introduction to Music3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
Any 4-credit Statistics (STAT) course4.0
Core Political Science Requirements
PSCI 110American Government I4.0
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
PSCI 130Research Methods in Political Science I4.0
PSCI 140Introduction to Comparative Political Analysis4.0
PSCI 150International Politics4.0
PSCI 211American Government II4.0
PSCI 220Constitutional Law I3.0
PSCI 230Research Methods in Political Science II4.0
PSCI 240Comparative Government3.0
PSCI 250American Foreign Policy3.0
PSCI 270Problems of Individual Liberty and Government Authority3.0
Three History electives (Only 200-level and above HIST courses will fulfill this requirement.)9.0
Political Science electives (Only 300-level and above PSCI courses will fulfill this requirement.)30.0
Free electives40.0
Total Credits182.0

*

Additional math sequence options are available. Students should check with the Department.

**

Additional science sequence options are available. Students should check with the Department.


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study (BS)

 

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 101Introduction to Analysis I4.0
PSCI 110American Government I4.0
PSCI 150International Politics4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 2
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
MATH 102Introduction to Analysis II4.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
PSCI 140Introduction to Comparative Political Analysis4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
PSCI 130Research Methods in Political Science I4.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 4
MUSC 130Introduction to Music3.0
PSCI 230Research Methods in Political Science II4.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
Western Literature Survey course*3.0
Science Sequence course 1*4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 5
PSCI 240Comparative Government3.0
ENGL 204
or 203 [WI]
Post-Colonial Literature II
Post-Colonial Literature I
3.0
Science Sequence Course 2*4.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
Free elective 2.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics4.0
PSCI 211American Government II4.0
ANTH 110
or 101
Human Past: Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology
Introduction to Cultural Diversity
3.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 7
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics4.0
PSCI 220Constitutional Law I3.0
History elective (200-level and above HIST course) 3.0
Statistics elective 4.0
Free elective 2.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
PSCI 250American Foreign Policy3.0
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 5.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 9
PSCI 270Problems of Individual Liberty and Government Authority3.0
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Term 12
Political Science electives (300-level and above PSCI courses) 6.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 182.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.


Accelerated BS/BA in Political Science and MS in Science, Technology & Society

About the Program

Drexel University Permits undergraduate students in 5-year programs to apply for graduate programs while completing their undergraduate programs, allowing students to complete their master's degrees in a shorter amount of time.

The accelerated-degree program provides an opportunity to simultaneously earn both a BA or BS degree and an MS degree in Science, Technology & Society (two diplomas are awarded) in the time normally required to finish a bachelor's degree alone.

Students entering the program must:

  • have and maintain a minimum of 3.0 grade point average throughout the program
  • have no fewer than 90.0 earned credits
  • have no more than 120.0  registered credits
  • complete only 2 co-ops if in a BS/MS program.

The Department of History and Politics would especially like to encourage its own majors to consider the accelerated degree program in Science, Technology & Society.

For more information about the accelerated BA-BS/MS program, contact:

MSTS Program Director
Macalister Hall, 3025
215.895.2463

Recommended Plan of Study

Students should work closely with faculty advisors in the Science, Technology & Society program to schedule an individualized plan of study for their accelerated degree completion.

The following is a sample plan of study for a student starting in pre-junior year, with 108.0 credit hours completed (based on a 5-year program in which the last co-op was dropped):

Dual Bachelor's Degree & MSTS Degree

 

222.0 minimum credits

Term 7Credits
Undergraduate Courses13.0
Two Science, Technology & Society Courses*6.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 8
Undergraduate Courses13.0
Two Science, Technology & Society Courses6.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 9
Undergraduate Courses10.0
Two Science, Technology & Society Courses6.0
One Graduate Elective**3.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 10
Undergraduate Courses10.0
Two Science, Technology & Society Courses6.0
HIST 696Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society3.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 11
Undergraduate Courses13.0
One Graduate Elective**3.0
HIST 697Practicum: Science and Technology in Action3.0
 Term Credits19.0
Term 12
One Graduate Elective10.0
Undergraduate Courses**3.0
HIST 698Master's Thesis6.0
 Term Credits19.0
Total Credit: 114.0

 

*

HIST 501 recommended as the first course.

**

Graduate electives may be taken as graduate-level courses in History-Politics or from other departments/Colleges within the University


Co-Op/Career Opportunities

Political science majors have a wide variety of co-op experiences from which to choose. Business and public utilities offer many lucrative possibilities, and local, state, and federal governments; museums and archives; and law firms present many additional interesting co-op placements. Pre-law students, for example, are especially eager to see the inside of a law office, whether the co-op job they receive is clerical or a more challenging paralegal assignment. These practical experiences in the “real” world can reinforce the lessons of the classroom, sharpen skills, and establish important contacts. Sample co-op positions include:

  • Law clerk/paralegal, Joe Davidson, Attorney-at-Law, Philadelphia
  • Research analyst, Legislative Office for Research Liaison, Harrisburg, PA
  • Legislative intern, Corporate Public Affairs Division, Philadelphia Electric Company
  • Assistant lobbyist, Government Relations Office, Drexel University
  • Education intern, Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Researcher, Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce
  • Assistant, Office of the Governor, Harrisburg, PA

Career Opportunities

The flexible programs allow students to shape a curriculum that meets their needs, whether they are preparing for the business world, graduate school in history or political science, the Department's Masters Program in Science, Technology, and Society, an MBA or other business program, or law school.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Courses

PSCI 100 Introduction to Political Science 4.0 Credits

Studies the political process, which determines who gets what, when, and how in society.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 110 American Government I 4.0 Credits

Introduces the elements of the American political system.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 120 History of Political Thought 4.0 Credits

Introduces the Western tradition of political thought, examining a selection of works by major political thinkers. Draws on primary sources, with a textual and conceptual emphasis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 130 Research Methods in Political Science I 4.0 Credits

Introduction to basic principles of political science writing and research design. Students learn how to locate, use, and evaluate information from a wide range of government agency websites and political science databases.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 140 Introduction to Comparative Political Analysis 4.0 Credits

Examines methods used to compare state political systems with respect to world order values in varying geographic and cultural settings.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 150 International Politics 4.0 Credits

Analyzes nation-states in their external relations, including the interaction of the great powers with each other and with emerging areas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 211 American Government II 4.0 Credits

Provides a structural analysis of selected social, economic, and political institutions at various levels of government in the American political system.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSCI 110 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 220 Constitutional Law I 3.0 Credits

Introduction to Constitutional law and the federal courts. Examines the emergence of judicial review, the judiciary's role in the system of check and balances, and the powers and limitations on each branch of government.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSCI 110 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 230 Research Methods in Political Science II 4.0 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with concepts, principles and tools of research methodology. Includes projects such as survey and content analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSCI 130 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 240 Comparative Government 3.0 Credits

Examines the political process through the ideology and institutions of major constitutional and totalitarian powers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSCI 140 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 250 American Foreign Policy 3.0 Credits

Examines current issues in American foreign policy, including the assumptions underlying policy goals, the means of achieving them, and the decision-making machinery.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSCI 150 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 255 International Political Economics 4.0 Credits

Analyzes the contradiction between the political-military world and the newly emerging trading world, and its impact on future global political systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 270 Problems of Individual Liberty and Government Authority 3.0 Credits

Examines the relationship between personal freedom and a just society from a variety of perspectives, all of which are designed to serve as an introduction to history and politics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSCI 120 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 272 Contemporary Political Issues 3.0 Credits

Examines a current policy issue in its political context. See departmental brochure for subject scheduled in a particular term. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 313 State & Local Government 3.0 Credits

Examines major political, social, and economic problems of state, local, and metropolitan governments.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 323 Comparative Political Thought 3.0 Credits

Studies modern political thinkers from African, Asian, Latin American, and other traditions of political thought. Uses a textual and conceptual emphasis, but also considers the political movements and social practices that have embraced or given birth to the works of the selected authors.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 325 Political Theory from Below 3.0 Credits

Rethinks traditional approaches to political theory by emphasizing study of texts and movements "from below," drawn from both African American and Latin American thinkers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 327 Democratic Theory 3.0 Credits

Examines the works of various classical and contemporary thinkers on the nature, justification, and practice of democracy. Emphasizes matters of liberty, equality, participation, and social choice.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 329 Theories of Justice 3.0 Credits

Examines the nature and realization of justice in modern societies, with special attention to contemporary questions of civil rights.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 330 Public Opinion & Propaganda 3.0 Credits

Examines public opinion and propaganda from a variety of perspectives, including the process of opinion formation and change and its role in the development of public policy and methods of measurement and analysis of public opinion.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 331 Environmental Politics 3.0 Credits

Examines environmental politics, focusing on the United States. Solving environmental problems is not simply a question of using available science and technology; rather, proposals to combat environmental degradation confront political context that may or may not favor the aims of environmental policy. Understanding politics is therefore indispensable for effective environmental problem-solving.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 335 Political Communication 3.0 Credits

Introduces an investigation of the relationship between politics and communication, with the goal of developing an understanding of political communication's role in election campaigns, news coverage, political debates, political advertising, and "normal" portrayals of the political system through media and interpersonal communication.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 340 Politics of Developing Nations 3.0 Credits

Analyzes problems of political and economic development (modernization) in the Third World, with the focus on Africa.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 344 Introduction to 20th Century Middle East 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the major historical events and political issues that define the region of the Middle East in the 20th century, including Zionism, Arab nationalism, Islamic fundamentalism, and the war on terror.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 345 Comparative Politics of the Middle East 3.0 Credits

Introduces students to political issues and challenges that face Middle Eastern men and women and deepens their understanding of comparative politics in non-Western cultures and nations. Analyzes such common problems as nationalism, religion, and state/society relations, then examines in depth four countries representing various regimes. Assumes some familiarity with Middle Eastern history and concentrates primarily on contemporary politics and political economy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSCI 150 [Min Grade: D] or PSCI 344 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 351 International Organizations 3.0 Credits

The goal of this course is to present an overview of the nature and function of international organization in world politics. The role of the United Nations and its agencies are highlighted, but other organizations are considered. Students gain an understanding of how international life is structured through these institutions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 352 Ethics and International Relations 3.0 Credits

Are ethics relevant in world politics, or are power and survival the only concerns? This course considers the main moral issues facing the international community. Topics include the "just war" tradition, human rights, humanitarian intervention, and what rich countries owe the poor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 353 International Human Rights 3.0 Credits

This course examines the origin of the international human rights movement after World War II, and discusses key issues confronting the international community today. These include genocide, political repression, the rights of women, and religious and cultural minorities. It also considers the moral basis of the rights ideal.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 354 United States & the Third World 3.0 Credits

Analyzes American foreign policy since 1945 with particular emphasis on the United States' rise to power as the major influence in the developing world of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 357 The European Union 3.0 Credits

This course combines an introduction to the history and institutions of the European Union with a special analysis of EU enlargement and institutional reform.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 358 Political Economy of Japan 3.0 Credits

Examines Japanese political economy on a global scale, focusing on her economic and trade relations with the United States, the Soviet Union, China, and Western Europe.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 363 Constitutional Law II 3.0 Credits

Examines protections for civil liberties afforded by the First Amendment of the Constitution, specifically those related to speech, the press, religion, and assembly.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 364 Constitutional Law III 3.0 Credits

Examines Constitutional civil rights claims arising under the Fourteenth Amendment equal protection and due process guarantees. Focuses on claims concerning discrimination on the basis of race, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as those asserted under an individual right to privacy in matters of reproductive rights, sexual conduct, and end of life decisions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 365 Politics, Law, & Justice 3.0 Credits

Examines justice as politically determined, including the personnel, policies, and practices of units of the legal system, especially civil, criminal, and juvenile courts in urban areas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 366 Supreme Court and American Politics 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the workings of the modern Supreme Court: theories of judicial interpretation; internal decision-making processes; the interplay of law and politics on the Court's personnel, agenda, and rulings; and the role of interest groups in shaping the Court's jurisprudence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 367 International Law 3.0 Credits

Examines the legal norms, codes resolutions, treaties conventions, court decisions, customs and other sources that comprised international law. Provides analysis of applications, especially in Europe.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 369 The Politics of Food 3.0 Credits

This course examines how politics shapes our diet. Though cultural and personal preferences influence what we eat, our food choices unfold in the context of public policies such as agricultural subsidies, trade agreements, and food safety regulations, etc. The 1st part of the course describes and analyzes the US food system, with a focus on regulatory policies and interest group politics. The 2nd part of the course examines the ideas and practices of food-based social movements that seek to create a food system that is less harmful to human and international health and more socially just than the existing system.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 370 Topics in Public Policy 3.0 Credits

Provides an in-depth exploration of an important public-policy issue or issue area in American or international life. Explores the origins, development, alternatives, and future consequences of an issue within the context of a political system. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 371 Science, Technology, & Public Policy 3.0 Credits

Examines the political effects of technological change, including public policy efforts to affect the impact of scientific development. Covers topics including atomic energy, electronic communications, and weapons development.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 372 City in United States Political Development 3.0 Credits

Course examines the role of the American city in the larger project of state-building. Topics covered include the changing functions of cities over American history; the role of cities in national political coalitions; and the construction of ethnic, racial, and class identities as a process or urbanization.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 374 Politics of Sport 3.0 Credits

The material in this course comes from a variety of disciplines and schools of thought with political science serving as an overarching framework. Issues covered include ethnicity, gender, race, nationalism, globalism, economics, and class.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 375 Politics of Immigration 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the issues associated with immigration from both a US and international as well as a historical and contemporary perspective. Emphasis will be focused on the theory, public policy and philosophical issues that are associated with this area of inquiry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 376 Running for Political Office 3.0 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the students to both the theory and practice of running for political office. Emphasis will be placed upon both the theoretical and applied aspects of political campaigns. The course will use a combination of readings, a text, films, lectures, and guest speakers.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 377 Politics of Latin America 3.0 Credits

Analysis of contemporary politics in South and Central American, as well as Cuba, with several in-depth country cases. Comparative themes include: legacies of military rules, economic dependency and revolution; dynamics of democratic transition, economic reform and U.S. hegemony; and, problems of domineering presidents weak parties and marginalized social groups.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 470 [WI] Junior Seminar in Political Science 3.0 Credits

A research seminar directed by a political scientist. Requires students to write an extended paper on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

PSCI 472 Special Studies in Political Science 12.0 Credits

Provides supervised individual study of special subjects in political science. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 490 [WI] Senior Seminar I 3.0 Credits

Requires an intensive research project supervised by a political scientist. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSCI 491 [WI] Senior Seminar II 3.0 Credits

Requires completion of the project begun in PSCI 490. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSCI 490 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 492 Political Science Honors Thesis I 3.0 Credits

Students develop and begin an in-depth research project under the supervision of a political scientist. Course is restricted to seniors with a minimum 3.30 GPA.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSCI and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSCI 211 [Min Grade: D] and PSCI 220 [Min Grade: D] and PSCI 230 [Min Grade: D] and PSCI 240 [Min Grade: D] and PSCI 250 [Min Grade: D] and PSCI 270 [Min Grade: D]

PSCI 493 Political Science Honors Thesis II 3.0 Credits

Students complete an in-depth research project under the supervision of a political scientist.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSCI and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSCI 492 [Min Grade: D]

History + Politics Faculty

Lloyd Ackert, PhD (Johns Hopkins University). Associate Teaching Professor. Russian science, history of biology, ecology.
Scott Barclay, PhD (Northwestern University) Department Head, History + Politics. Professor. Judicial systems, civil rights, public policy and administration.
Eric Dorn Brose, PhD (Ohio State University). Professor. German and European history.
Zoltan Buzas, PhD (Ohio State University). Post-Doctoral Fellow. International relations theory, international security, race and politics, diplomatic history.
George Ciccariello-Maher, PhD (University of California, Berkeley). Assistant Professor. Colonialism, social movements, political theory.
Rose Corrigan, PhD (Rutgers University) Director of Women's Studies Program. Associate Professor. Women, public law, American politics and policy.
Richardson Dilworth, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) Director, Center for Public Policy. Associate Professor. American political development, urban politics, public policy.
Daniel V. Friedheim, PhD (Yale University). Assistant Teaching Professor. International relations, comparative politics, democratization.
Erin R. Graham, PhD (Ohio State University). Assistant Professor. International institutions, international relations theory, global environmental politics.
Amelia Hoover Green, PhD (Yale University). Assistant Professor. Dynamics of conflict-related violence; intra-armed group politics and socialization; statistics in human rights.
Christian Hunold, PhD (University of Pittsburgh). Associate Professor. Environmental policy and comparative politics.
Kelly Joyce, PhD (Boston College) Director, Master's Program in Science Technology & Society. Professor. Science, medicine and technology; aging and technology; qualitative social science methods, social theory.
Scott G. Knowles, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) Associate Dean and Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry, Pennoni Honors College. Associate Professor. Urban history, history of technology, modern history.
Jonson Miller, PhD (Virginia Tech). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technology, American history, military history.
Julie Mostov, PhD (New York University) Associate Vice Provost for International Programs. Professor. Modern political thought, democratic theory, nationalism, gender studies, South Eastern Europe and the Balkans.
Joel E. Oestreich, PhD (Brown University) Director of International Area Studies. Associate Professor. International organizations, international finance, development, and human rights.
William L. Rosenberg, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Behavioral politics, public opinion, and political communication.
Tiago Saraiva, PhD (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). Assistant Professor. Science and fascism, environment in contemporary history, global circulation of science, industrialized organisms and food, model organisms and genetics research.
Jonathan Seitz, PhD (University of Wisconsin) Director of Undergraduate Studies for History + Politics. Associate Teaching Professor. History of religion, science, medicine, witchcraft, early modern Europe, Italy.
Amy Slaton, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. History of science and technology; race, labor.
Kathryn Steen, PhD (University of Delaware). Associate Professor. History of technology, history of industry and business, and comparative history.
Donald F. Stevens, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Modern Latin American history.
Robert Zaller, PhD (Washington University). Professor. English history and early modern European history.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard L. Rosen, PhD (Case Western Reserve University). Associate Professor Emeritus. History of science, appropriate technology, and world history.
Michael J. Sullivan, PhD (University of Virginia). Professor Emeritus. Comparative politics and developing nations.
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