Psychology

Bachelor of Science Degree: 182.0 quarter credits

About the Program

Psychology seeks the answers to a broad variety of questions regarding the behavior, thoughts, and emotions of individuals. These questions range from the biochemical basis of memory and the effects of stress on health to understanding the causes of emotional problems or such experiences as falling in love. These questions are studied by using scientific research techniques both in the laboratory and the “real” world. The answers are applied in fields such as business, the health sciences, law, education, counseling, and the design of useful and usable technologies. 

One strength of the psychology program at Drexel is its emphasis on psychological statistics and research methodology. Psychology majors are well trained in research data analysis and find employment opportunities in research and corporate settings more readily. One other opportunity available to Drexel psychology undergraduates is the co-operative education/internship programs, through which students mix periods of full-time, career-related employment with their academic studies. This allows students to have “hands on” experience in a variety of clinical settings throughout the Philadelphia metropolitan region, and makes them more competitive for employment after graduation.

Combined Bachelors/Masters Degree

There is an accelerated MS program entitled the Psychology BS/MS Scholars program to which undergraduates may apply. For more information, visit the Drexel University Department of Psychology homepage.

Additional Information 

To schedule an appointment with a Psychology faculty advisor, students should contact the Psychology department's academic coordinator:

Tara McNair
Academic Coordinator
Psychology Department
3141 Chestnut Street
215-895-0487
tym22@drexel.edu

Degree Requirements 

College Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
CS 161Introduction to Computing3.0
Select one of the following:8.0
Introduction to Analysis I
   and Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus I
   and Calculus II
PSCI 100Introduction to Political Science4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience3.0
Economics elective4.0
Fine Arts elective3.0
History electives6.0
Philosophy elective3.0
Two English (ENGL) courses, 200-level or above6.0
Select one of the following sequences:8.0
Biology
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics
General Physics I
   and General Physics II
Other Courses
Free electives53.0
Departmental Requirements
General Psychology Requirements
PSY 111Pre-Professional General Psychology I *3.0
PSY 112Pre-Professional General Psychology II *3.0
Sociology/Anthropology Requirements
Sociology (SOC) course3.0
Anthropology (ANTH) course3.0
100-Level Requirements
Select two of the following:6.0
Developmental Psychology
Approaches to Personality
Introduction to Social Psychology
Required Psychology Courses
PSY 212Physiological Psychology3.0
PSY 325Psychology of Learning3.0
PSY 240 [WI] Abnormal Psychology3.0
PSY 280Psychological Research I3.0
PSY 264Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I3.0
PSY 265Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II3.0
PSY 290History and Systems of Psychology3.0
PSY 330Cognitive Psychology3.0
PSY 360 [WI] Experimental Psychology3.0
PSY 380Psychological Testing and Assessment3.0
Advanced Psychology Electives
Select four of the following:12.0
Evolutionary Psychology
Sensation and Perception
Child Psychopathology
Sports Psychology
Industrial Psychology
Death and Dying
Drugs & Human Behavior
Advanced Developmental Psychology
Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering
Human-Computer Interaction
Counseling Psychology
Advanced Social Psychology
Health Psychology
Women's Health Psychology
Neuropsychology
Advanced Personality Seminar
Theories & Practices in Clinical Psychology
Senior Seminar Sequence **
PSY 490 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis I4.0
PSY 491 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis II4.0
PSY 492 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis III4.0
Total Credits182.0

*

Students with AP psychology, or transfer students with PSY 101 credit, should check the AP Student Placement Exam Crosswalk or check with their advisor.

**

Students who do not wish to elect the research seminar sequence are required to take four additional advanced psychology electives instead.


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 111Pre-Professional General Psychology I3.0
MATH 121
or 101
Calculus I
Introduction to Analysis I
4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Select one of the following:4.0
General Chemistry I 
General Physics I 
Cells, Genetics & Physiology 
 Term Credits16.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
PSY 112Pre-Professional General Psychology II3.0
MATH 102
or 122
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus II
4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience2.0
Select one of the following:4.0
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution 
General Chemistry II 
General Physics II 
Select one of the following:3.0
Developmental Psychology 
Approaches to Personality 
Introduction to Social Psychology 
 Term Credits19.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
PSY 240 [WI] Abnormal Psychology3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Developmental Psychology 
Introduction to Social Psychology 
Approaches to Personality 
Sociology/Anthropology elective (SOC or ANTH) 3.0
Fine Arts elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
PSCI 100Introduction to Political Science4.0
PSY 264Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I3.0
PSY 290History and Systems of Psychology3.0
Sociology/Anthropology elective (SOC or ANTH) 3.0
English (ENGL) course, 200-level or above3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 150
or 230
Mass Media and Society
Techniques of Speaking
3.0
PSY 265Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II3.0
PSY 330Cognitive Psychology3.0
PSY 212Physiological Psychology3.0
English (ENGL) course, 200-level or above3.0
Philosophy (PHIL) elective 3.0
 Term Credits18.0
Term 6
PSY 212Physiological Psychology3.0
PSY 280Psychological Research I3.0
PSY 360 [WI] Experimental Psychology3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Psychology elective3.0
Economics (ECON) elective 4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 7
PSY 325Psychology of Learning3.0
PSY 380Psychological Testing and Assessment3.0
History elective 3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits18.0
Term 8
Advanced Psychology course*3.0
History elective3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
Advanced Psychology course*3.0
Free electives9.0
 Term Credits12.0
Term 10
PSY 490 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis I (or adv. PSY elective (If electives are chosen, 12.0 credits in total are required.) )4.0
Advanced Psychology elective3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 11
PSY 491 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis II4.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 12
PSY 492 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis III (or adv. PSY elective (If electives are chosen, 12.0 credits in total are required.) )4.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits13.0
Total Credit: 185.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.



Co-op/Career Opportunities

Some graduates seek employment immediately after receiving their bachelor’s degrees.They are well trained to work as research assistants in consulting firms and medical settings or to provide front-line services in mental health and educational settings. Other graduates go on to professional schools in law, business, medicine, and other health professions. Still others pursue graduate training in psychology and related fields. Students build skills and knowledge that provide a foundation for advanced study, create opportunities for future growth, and can be used to improve the quality of life for others.

Co-Op Experiences

Drexel University has long been known for its co-operative education programs, through which students mix periods of full-time, career-related employment with their studies. Co-op/internship employment is an option for psychology majors. Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Minor in Psychology 

The minor in psychology is intended to meet the needs of students who recognize that an understanding and analysis of individual psychological processes is an important component of their education. The minor may also be of interest to students who have an interest in a double major but are unable to satisfy all of the requirements in two major fields.

Entry into the minor requires that PSY 101 General Psychology (or an equivalent introductory course) be taken as a prerequisite. Students who have completed and who are interested in a minor in Psychology are expected to meet with a Psychology Department faculty member to discuss the selection of courses appropriate to their major and their own personal interests. No more than three courses that are required for a student’s major can count towards fulfilling requirements for the minor.

Required Prerequisite
General Psychology I (or equivalent)
Required Courses
Select eight of the following:24.0
Developmental Psychology
Approaches to Personality
Introduction to Social Psychology
Evolutionary Psychology
Physiological Psychology
Sensation and Perception
Abnormal Psychology
Sports Psychology
Industrial Psychology
Death and Dying
Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I
Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II
History and Systems of Psychology
Drugs & Human Behavior
Advanced Developmental Psychology
Psychology of Learning
Cognitive Psychology
Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering
Human-Computer Interaction
Psychological Testing and Assessment
Advanced Social Psychology
Experimental Psychology
Psychological Testing and Assessment
Neuropsychology
Theories & Practices in Clinical Psychology
Special Topics in Psychology
Total Credits24.0

Courses

PSY 101 General Psychology I 3.0 Credits

Reviews the fundamental principles, concepts, and methods of psychology, with emphasis on the concepts of motivation, learning, and perception, and their psychological foundations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 111 Pre-Professional General Psychology I 3.0 Credits

Preprofessional General Psychology is designed for majors and for other preprofessionals who are interested in Psychology as a minor. A scientific approach to the study of psychology is taken. An overview of the fundamental principles of psychology across a variety of sub-disciplines is offered. Part one is part of a two-part sequence and focuses on the experimental bases of psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 112 Pre-Professional General Psychology II 3.0 Credits

Preprofessional General Psychology is designed for preprofessionals who are interested in psychology or related fields, especially designed for majors, and may be taken by minors of psychology. It follows Preprofessional General Psychology I and includes a laboratory component to enhance the scientific approach to psychology. Part two focuses on the application of scientific principles of psychology to human behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 111 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 120 Developmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines the nature of developmental processes-perceptual, intellectual, emotional, and social-and the factors influencing and limiting them.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 140 Approaches to Personality 3.0 Credits

Discusses the major concepts of Freud, neo-Freudians, behaviorists, humanists, trait theorists, and others. Emphasizes understanding of self and others for psychotherapy and research. Fall.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 150 Introduction to Social Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines theoretical and research findings in personal experiences of interacting with others in family and group settings, and with society in general.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 210 Evolutionary Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers principles of genetics and evolution as applied to the behavior of the important types of living beings, from plants and unicellular organisms to the primates (including humans).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 212 Physiological Psychology 3.0 Credits

Reviews neural foundations of behavior, including the study of nerve activity and brain function.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 213 Sensation and Perception 3.0 Credits

Examines the structure and function of the senses, including vision, hearing, touch, temperature, pain, olfaction, gustation, time, and kinesthesia. Considers interaction of the senses and their role in determining behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 222 Psychological Problems of Modern Youth 3.0 Credits

Examines psychological problem areas frequently encountered by young adults in today's society, including identity crisis, family conflict, the new sexuality, drugs, and the search for intimacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 225 Child Psychopathology 3.0 Credits

This class will focus on the symptoms, etiology, and primary methods of treating common psychological disorders and problems of children and adolescence. The course will focus on diagnosis; assessment; specific therapeutic treatments; ethical issues; and gender, cultural, and developmental differences in symptoms, diagnosis, and response to treatment.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 240 [WI] Abnormal Psychology 3.0 Credits

Offers advanced course in the general study of personality. Focuses on the way our society defines, explains, and handles behavior perceived as deviant and "normal." Requires field trip. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 242 Psychology of Disability 3.0 Credits

Psychological and social consequences of physical disability for the disabled person and his or her family and social network. Emphasis on disabilities of the sensory and nervous systems. Practicum component.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 244 Culture and Personality 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on comparing specific human behaviors (e.g. aggression, health), roles (e.g. gender), and psychological processes (e.g. cognition, emotion, perception) across cultures in order to ascertain similarities and differences among cultures around the globe. This course has an interdisciplinary focus.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 245 [WI] Sports Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers sports psychology, which is the science of understanding, modifying, and predicting athletic performance or sports participation. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 250 [WI] Industrial Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers theories, experiments, and problem-solving efforts of behavioral scientists in industrial settings for students interested in interpersonal relations, management, leadership, personnel, and applied psychology. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 252 Death and Dying 3.0 Credits

Explores death and dying from various perspectives, including the philosophical, psychological, sociocultural, and personal.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 254 Psychology of Sexual Behavior 3.0 Credits

Examines psychology of the individual coping with the sexual aspects of life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 264 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers data analysis using a mainframe statistical package covering basic elementary techniques of data reduction, manipulation, and statistical analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 265 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers more advanced statistical techniques, such as regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and multiple regression.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]) and PSY 264 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 280 Psychological Research I 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the issues, techniques and methodologies associated with conducting psychological research. Topics to be covered include the logic of research in psychology, important issues in deciding how to study various psychological phenomena, ethical issues and guidelines in conducting psychological research, design and analysis of psychological research, assessing threats to internal and external validity, methods used in the interpretation of psychological data, and writing research reports in the style used by research psychologists.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 264 [Min Grade: D] and PSY 265 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 285 Writing in Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course will build on students existing knowledge of psychology while helping them better evaluate and create various types of written documents commonly used to communicate information in the field of psychology (e.g., research articles, literature reviews, position papers). Emphasis is placed on a skills-based approach to acquiring knowledge of how to communicate information and applying that knowledge in various contexts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: C] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: C]

PSY 290 History and Systems of Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines the historical foundations of modern psychology, with emphasis on the growth, contributions, and decline of major systems and theories.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 305 Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology 3.0 Credits

Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology. Fosters critical thinking skills regarding the evaluation of paranormal, unusual, or extraordinary phenomena (e.g. ESP, recovered memories of abuse). Examines ways that a human cognition leads to strange beliefs despite contradictory data. The distinctions between science and pseudoscience are highlighted.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 310 Drugs & Human Behavior 3.0 Credits

Covers the fundamentals of drug effects on the nervous system and behavior, with emphasis on abused substances and drugs used in the treatment of behavioral disorders.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 320 [WI] Educational Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers role and relevance of psychology in the teacher-learner relationship, with independent application of research techniques in an individual field study. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 322 Advanced Developmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides in-depth exploration of child and adolescent physical, cognitive/intellectual, and psychosocial development. Students have the opportunity to observe children and their caregivers through videotaped vignettes created to bring developmental principles to life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]) and PSY 120 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 325 Psychology of Learning 3.0 Credits

Introduces basic principles of the science of learning. Emphasizes I. P. Pavlov's classical conditioning, B. F. Skinner's operant conditioning, and applications to counseling and therapy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 330 Cognitive Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers human thought processes, including perception and pattern recognition, learning and memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 332 Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering 3.0 Credits

Discusses ways of designing machines, operations, and work environments so that they match human capacities and limitations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 335 Pediatric Psychology 3.0 Credits

The focus of this seminar is the examination of psychosocial and medical issues during the period of infancy, childhood, and adolescense including relevant biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural aspects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 336 Psychology of Language 3.0 Credits

This course is a survey of the theories and methodologies in the psychology of language. It covers topics such as language acquisition, comprehension, and production, as well as the relation between language and thought and the question of the uniqueness of language in the animal kingdom.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 337 Human-Computer Interaction 3.0 Credits

Applies cognitive and experimental psychology to understanding how to improve the design and usability of interactive computing systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 342 Counseling Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers theory and practice of establishing helping relationships. Includes role-playing, analyzing, and observations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 345 Narrative Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course explores the historic contributions to the narrative tradition in psychology and its current research and theoretical concerns. We will discuss contributions to the construction of meaning from bioethics and medical humanities, qualitative research, the neuroscience of memory, literary theory, and social, cognitive, and developmental psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 350 Advanced Social Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides in-depth exploration of topics in the social influence process, including current research in social cognition, attitude change, and group dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 150 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 352 Environmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Multidisciplinary study of the interrelationship between human behavior and the natural, built, and social environments.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 355 Health Psychology 3.0 Credits

Health Psychology is designed to: concentrate on the application of psychological theories and variables to compromising and health enhancing behaviors; demonstrate the psychological management of chronic illness; and the role of psychologists written medical and health settings. For example, it focuses on the effects of stress on the body, the mind-body connection, and how psychology can affect physical well-being.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 356 Women's Health Psychology 3.0 Credits

Explores the major psychological and behavioral factors influencing health and illness among women. Topics, such as lifecycle challenges (PMS and reproductive health), chronic diseases, and new directions in health promotion are addressed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 357 The Psychology of Eating Disorders and Obesity 3.0 Credits

Covers determinants of eating behavior and body weight as well as psychological treatments for them. Factors influencing eight regulation will be reviewed. The causes, consequences, and treatments for anorexia and bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder will be reviewed. Finally, the courses will review the causes, consequences and treatments for obesity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 360 [WI] Experimental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides a study of the basic scientific fundamentals of the experiment with emphasis upon the critical thinking this method represents in establishing psychological principles. Contrasts are made to such modern pseudosciences as parapsychology. A final experiment is required of all students in this course. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 265 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 364 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers data analysis using a mainframe statistical package covering basic elementary techniques of data reduction, manipulation, and statistical analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 365 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers more advanced statistical techniques, such as regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and multiple regression.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 364 [Min Grade: D] and (PSY 112 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 101 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 368 Critical Psychology 3.0 Credits

In this course we examine underlying values and beliefs of the field and place them in the context such as inequity, social justice, power relations, and what type of knowledge counts, to arrive at a more critical understanding of the practices and theories in psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 370 Forensic Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course describes the psychological processes involved in the legal system. The material delves into the growing field of psychological study and application in the legal field.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 380 Psychological Testing and Assessment 3.0 Credits

Enables the student to gain an understanding of the proper uses and applications of psychological evaluation by focusing on psychometric properties and reviewing selected tests and evaluation procedures commonly employed by psychologists in research and clinical practice.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 280 [Min Grade: D] and PSY 360 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 410 Neuropsychology 3.0 Credits

Provides a study of the relationship between human brain function and behavior. Examines basic anatomy of the brain and focuses on principles of human neuropsychological functioning. Studies cortical and "higher cognitive functioning" in depth through a focus on both normal and brain-injured individuals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 440 Advanced Personality Seminar 3.0 Credits

Examines historical and contemporary trends and methods in personality research and assessment. Students have an opportunity to evaluate strengths and limitations of these trends and methods, as well as develop their own ideas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 140 [Min Grade: D] and (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 442 Theories & Practices in Clinical Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides an overview of clinical psychology theory and practice including professional issues, assessment strategies, and psychotherapy theories. Students have the opportunity to develop their own philosophy of clinical psychology and to apply theories to case examples.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 445 Positive Psychology 3.0 Credits

The course provides an overview of the emerging subfield of psychology known as "positive psychology". This area focuses on investigating and understanding positive aspects of well-being and health, including various human strengths, such as resilience, optimism, spirituality, hope, and problem-solving.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 450 Autism Spectrum Disorders 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to research and issues involving individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Topics include societal perceptions of the disorder, epidemiology, advocacy, assessment and evaluation, adult issues, and legal issues. Course includes an overview of common interventions. Students plan and carry out interviews with individuals with autism as part of the final project.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PSY 120 [Min Grade: C]

PSY 460 Advanced Experimental Psychology: Laboratory Applications and Techniques 3.0 Credits

Introduction to variety of laboratory techniques; survey of how basic psychological theories and knowledge influence actual practice in the psychological laboratory. Laboratory exercises will focus on development of the research skills necessary for independent research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 477 Senior Seminar I 3.0 Credits

In-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects selected by students in consultation with professor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 478 Senior Seminar II 3.0 Credits

Continuation of PSYCH 477.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 480 Directed Studies in Psychology 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides supervised reading and studies in special fields of contemporary psychology. See department brochure for topics and terms offered.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY 490 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis I 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.

PSY 491 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis II 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSY 490 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 492 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis III 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSY 491 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 499 Independent Study 1.0-3.0 Credit

This Independent Study provides the opportunity for an undergraduate student to engage in the study of a particular area of psychology that is not covered in-depth by an existing course. Typically, this independent study would focus on a narrower topic (e.g., autism, school violence, bullying, psychology of sleep, etc.) than a given course (e.g., abnormal psychology). Moreover, the nature of the study would be more in-depth than can be accomplished in a traditional course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Psychology Faculty

Meg Butryn, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Research Professor. Treatment and prevention of obesity and eating disorders, behavioral treatment, acceptance and commitment therapy.
Dorothy Charbonnier, PhD (SUNY Stony Brook). Assistant Teaching Professor. The nature of the creative process and writing.
Douglas L. Chute, PhD (University of Missouri) Louis and Bessie Stein Fellow. Professor. Neuropsychology and rehabilitation; technological applications for the cognitively compromised and those with acquired brain injuries.
Brian Daly, PhD (Loyola University, Chicago). Assistant Professor. Pediatric neuropsychology, intervention with at-risk youth.
David DeMatteo, PhD, JD (MCP Hahnemann University; Villanova University School of Law) Director of the JD-PhD Program in Law and Psychology. Associate Professor. Psychopathy, forensic mental health assessment, drug policy; offender diversion.
Evan M. Forman, PhD (University of Rochester) Director of Graduate Studies. Associate Professor. Clinical psychology: mechanisms and measurement of psychotherapy outcome, cognitive-behavioral and acceptance based psychotherapies, the development and evaluation of acceptance-based interventions for health behavior change (for problems of obesity and cardiac disease) as well as mood and anxiety disorders; neurocognition of eating.
Jennifer Gallo, PhD (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor. Geropsychology, neuropsychology, and assessment of dementia.
Pamela Geller, PhD (Kent State University). Associate Professor. Stressful life events and physical and mental health outcomes, particularly in the area of women's reproductive health (e.g. pregnancy, pregnancy loss, infertility, medical education).
Maureen Gibney, PsyD (Widener University). Associate Teaching Professor. Clinical psychopathology; neuropsychological evaluation and intervention with the elderly.
Naomi Goldstein, PhD (University of Massachusetts) Co-Director of the JD-PhD Program. Associate Professor. Forensic psychology; juvenile justice; Miranda rights comprehension; false confessions; juvenile justice treatment outcome research; anger management intervention development; child and adolescent behavior problems.
Kirk Heilbrun, PhD (University of Texas at Austin). Professor. Forensic psychology, violence risk communication, juvenile and adult criminality, violence risk assessment, forensic psychological assessment, treatment of mentally disordered offenders, academic-sports mentoring.
James D. Herbert, PhD (University of North Carolina) Interim Provost. Professor. Assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders; acceptance and mindfulness-based psychotherapies; the role of empiricism in clinical psychology; evidence-based practice in behavioral health.
Marlin Killen, PhD (Trident University International) Faculty Coordinator of ePsychology. Associate Teaching Professor.
Jacqueline D. Kloss, PhD (Binghamton University). Associate Professor. Health psychology; clinical psychology; written emotional expression and health; women and sleep; college students and sleep and cognitive-behavioral approaches to insomnia.
John Kounios, PhD (University of Michigan) Director, PhD Program in Applied Cognitive and Brain Sciences. Professor. Cognitive neuroscience, especially creativity, problem solving, and cognitive enhancement.
Michael Lowe, PhD (Boston College). Professor. Prevention and treatment of eating disorders and obesity; effects of appetitive responsiveness and dietary restraint on eating regulation; psychobiology of obesity-proneness; empirical foundations of unconscious processes.
Tamara Medina, PhD (Johns Hopkins University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, statistics.
Dan Mirman, PhD (Carnegie Mellon University). Assistant Professor. Recognition, comprehension, and production of spoken words; organization and processing of semantic knowledge; computational models of brain and behavior; statistical methods for analysis of time course data
Arthur Nezu, PhD (State University of New York at Stony Brook). Distinguished Professor. Behavioral medicine applications of problem-solving therapy and other cognitive-behavior therapies (e.g., to decrease emotional and psychosocial risk factors; improve adherence), particularly with regard to patients with cardiovascular disease; assessment.
Christine Maguth Nezu, PhD (Fairleigh Dickinson University). Professor. Cognitive-behavioral assessment and treatment for mood, anxiety, personality disorders, and coping with chronic illness; mind/body studies; stress and coping; developmental disabilities and comorbid behavioral and emotional disorders; spirituality and psychology.
Karol Osipowicz, PhD (Thomas Jefferson University). Assistant Teaching Professor. The application of advanced neuroimaging to the study of human brain function and anatomy.
Ludo Scheffer, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of Undergraduate Studies. Teaching Professor. Metacognition; early literacy and language acquisition; program evaluation and measurement to improve student achievement and teacher performance.
Maria Schultheis, PhD (Drexel University) Director of Clinical Training. Associate Professor. Clinical Neuropsychology and rehabilitation following neurological compromise (brain injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis), application of technologies in psychology. Specialization in the use of virtual reality (VR) simulation, and evaluation of the demands of driving after disability.
Jennifer Schwartz, PhD (Idaho State University) Director of Psychological Services Center. Associate Teaching Professor. Adult psychopathology; evidence-based clinical practice; competency-based training; competency-based clinical supervision.
Chris Sims, PhD (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). Assistant Professor. Learning and decision-making under uncertainty; visual memory and perceptual expertise; sensorimotor control and motor learning; computational models of cognition.
Julia Sluzenski, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Spatial and episodic memory, memory loss across the lifespan, developmental psychology.
Mary Spiers, PhD (University of Alabama at Birmingham) Director, Psychology Master's Program. Associate Professor. Clinical neuropsychology and medical psychology; memory and practical applications for memory disorders in the elderly; cognitive health of women.
J. Michael Williams, PhD (University of Vermont). Associate Professor. Memory disorder; traumatic brain injury; auditory neglect; neuropsychological assessment; recovery and rehabilitation of brain function; functional magnetic resonance imaging.
Eric A Zillmer, PsyD (Florida Institute of Technology) Carl R. Pacifico Professor of Neuropsychology and the Director of Athletics. Professor. Psychological assessment (neuropsychological, cognitive, personality), psychiatric and neurological disorders, behavioral medicine, neurogerontology, mathematical modeling, sports psychology, psychology of genocide.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Charles A. Williams, PhD (Temple University) Psychology and Education Stoneleigh Foundation Fellow. Associate Teaching Professor. Prevention of school-aged violence; Bullying awareness, education and prevention; Outcomes for youth in placement; Social skills and learning in school–aged youth.

Emeritus Faculty

Thomas T. Hewett, PhD (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). Professor Emeritus. Human computer interaction and cognitive engineering; development of computing environments to support knowledge, workers, and high performance experts.
Myrna Shure, PhD (Cornell University). Professor Emeritus. Child development, problem-solving interventions with children, prevention programs.
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