Sociology

Bachelor of Arts Degree: 182.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The sociology major at Drexel University has three components: theory, methods, substantive coursework and features specialized coursework relating to social justice issues.

Sociology is the systematic study of societies. Society is the sum total of individual and group interaction and relations, from small groups and families to global networks and complex social organizations. The discipline covers a wide variety of fields of inquiry. Sociologists examine structural relations—how human society is organized from small groups to large institutions—and is committed to developing a critical understanding of these relationships. Thus the sociology major stresses theory, research methods, quantitative and qualitative data analysis as applied to a wide variety of substantive areas including but not limited to social inequality, political power, gender, class, race, ethnicity, family, crime, technology and environmental change as well as a wide variety of social and political movements connected with social change. The stress on critical understanding means that sociology majors will strive not only to develop strong analytic abilities but an intellectual and ethical engagement reflected in sociologically informed thinking and action.The research and analytical skills developed in our program are sought after by a wide variety of professions.

Specialized social justice coursework is typically carried out in connection with community groups and organizations. It is a way through which the Sociology Program and Drexel University as a whole seeks to become practically engaged with the wider community while promoting social justice.

For more information about the sociology major, visit the Sociology web page. 

Degree Requirements 

General Requirements
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Four Humanities/Fine Arts Courses 12.0
Two Mathematics Courses 6.0-8.0
Two Science Courses6.0-8.0
Two Consecutive Foreign Language Courses *8.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
Two Additional Social and Behavioral Sciences Courses 6.0
International Studies
Two International Studies Courses 6.0
Studies in Diversity
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
One Additional Studies in Diversity Course 3.0
Sociology Core Requirements
Required Major Seminar
SOC 395Seminar in Sociology (3-credit course, taken 4 or 5 terms)12.0-15.0
Theory Sequence
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
ANTH 410Cultural Theory3.0
SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory3.0
Methods Sequence
ANTH 370Ethnographic Methods3.0
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Core Courses
Select five of the following:15.0
Race and Ethnic Relations
Women & Men in a Changing Society
Wealth and Power
Urban Sociology
Sociology of Deviant Behavior
Developing Nations and the International Division of Labor
Other Program Requirements
Select ten of the following:30.0
Human Past: Anthropology and Prehistoric Archeology
Biblical Archaeology: The Archaeology of Israel and Jordan
Topics in World Ethnography
Aging In Cross-Cultural Perspective
Societies In Transition: The Impact of Modernization and the Third World
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
Special Topics in Anthropology
Juvenile Justice
Techniques of Speaking
Business Communication
Public Relations Principles and Theory
Sociology of the Future
Social Problems
Sociology of the Family
Sociology of Aging
Sociology of Work
Sociology of Health
Women & Men in a Changing Society
Urban Sociology
Theory of Applied and Community Sociology
Topics in Political Sociology
Topics in Sociology of Religion
Topics in Sociology of Science and Technology
HIV/AIDS and Africa
Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Sociology of Education I
Environmental Movements in America
Social Movements
Sociology of the Environment
Sociology of Disasters
Research Methods II
Practicum in Applied and Community Sociology
Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II
Special Topics in Sociology
Social Change & Planning
Sociology Research Seminar I
Sociology Research Seminar II
Sociology Research Seminar III
Introduction to Social Psychology
Death and Dying
Advanced Social Psychology
Special Topics-University Wide
Free Electives33.0
Total Credits182.0-189.0

*

At least one foreign language course must be at the 200-level. In addition, the department recommends students take 2 additional foreign language courses as free electives.



Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study

 

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3.0
SOC 395Seminar in Sociology3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Mathematics Course3.0-4.0
Foreign Language Course 4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 2
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Foreign Language Course 4.0
Mathematics Course 3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 3
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Diversity3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Science Elective*3.0-4.0
Foreign Language Course 4.0
 Term Credits16.0-17.0
Term 4
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 210Race and Ethnic Relations3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 395Seminar in Sociology3.0
Foreign Language Course 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
ANTH 370Ethnographic Methods3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
SOC 240Urban Sociology3.0
Free Elective 3.0
Science Elective*3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 6
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Diversity Studies Elective 3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective 3.0
Other Program Requirement*3.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
SOC 220Wealth and Power3.0
SOC 230Women & Men in a Changing Society3.0
Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective 3.0
Other Program Requirement*3.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
SOC 320Sociology of Deviant Behavior3.0
SOC 330Developing Nations and the International Division of Labor3.0
SOC 395Seminar in Sociology3.0
Other Program Requirement*3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 3.0
Free Elective 3.0
International Studies Elective 3.0
Other Program Requirements*6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
ANTH 410Cultural Theory3.0
SOC 395Seminar in Sociology3.0
Other Program Requirements*6.0
Humanities/Fine Arts Elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory3.0
Other Program Requirements*6.0
International Studies Elective 3.0
Free Elective 4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 12
Other Program Requirement*3.0
Sociology Core Course*3.0
Humanities/Fine Arts Electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 182.0-186.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.


Co-op/Career Opportunities

An undergraduate degree in sociology is excellent preparation for law school, medical school, or for graduate work in such fields as sociology, history, gerontology, or political science.

Outside of academics, sociologists work in a wide variety of settings. Some serve as statistical analysts for market research firms, health care agencies, and government. Others are involved in urban planning, survey research, public relations, agency management, trend analysis, or criminal justice.There are sociologists of religion working for national church organizations, and sociologists specializing in gerontology who are engaged in research or administration for agencies concerned with the aged.

Co-Op Experiences

Some recent co-op positions held by sociology students include the following:

  • Research Coordinator, West Philadelphia Community Center
  • Counselor, Camden Youth Program
  • Research Analyst, Philadelphia Stock Exchange
  • Case Investigator, Howard County Police Department
  • Assistant Copy Editor, Philadelphia Newspapers, Inc.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Minor in Sociology

The sociology minor is designed to give students specializing in other fields a broader knowledge of contemporary social issues and the ability to analyze them in a reasoned fashion. For students majoring in such fields as business and engineering, the minor helps develop skills in critical thinking that go beyond the acquisition of specialized, professional techniques. For students majoring in another area of the liberal arts, the minor offers the opportunity to place the issues raised in the major discipline within a larger social context.

Please note: No more than three courses that are required for a student’s major can count towards fulfilling requirements for the minor.

Required Courses
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory3.0
Select five of the following:15.0
Aging In Cross-Cultural Perspective
Societies In Transition: The Impact of Modernization and the Third World
Gender, Crime and Justice
Sociology of the Future
Social Problems
Sociology of the Family
Sociology of Aging
Criminology & Criminal Justice
Race and Ethnic Relations
Sociology of Work
Wealth and Power
Sociology of Technology & Aging
Women & Men in a Changing Society
Sociology of Health
Topics in Political Sociology
Sociology of Deviant Behavior
Developing Nations and the International Division of Labor
Sociology of Education I
Sociology of Education II
Globalization
Research Methods II
Social Change & Planning
Total Credits24.0

Courses

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3.0 Credits

Introduction to what sociology is and what it studies. Topics will include socialization, group dynamics, gender roles, structural inequality, race and ethnic group relations, stratification, deviance, and population studies. Special attention will be paid to core institutions (e.g. family, education, religion, political and economic systems) as well as theories and methods of guiding sociological investigation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 110 Sociology of the Future 3.0 Credits

Examines current theories, trends and projections for social change in the coming decades. Focuses on the role played by such factors as technological advancement, climate change, global capitalism and social movements in shaping the future.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 115 Social Problems 3.0 Credits

Provides a sociological analysis into the causes and possible cures for a variety of social problems. Focuses on topics such as unemployment, crime, poverty, corporate concentration of wealth and power, racism, immigration, health care, and environmental degradation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 120 Sociology of the Family 3.0 Credits

Examines structure and functions of the family and the roles, relationships, problems, and opportunities of family living from a variety of perspectives. Uses lectures, field experiences, and discussion.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 125 Sociology of Aging 3.0 Credits

Introduces the multidisciplinary scientific study of the causes and consequences of aging, its history, methods of research, major theoretical approaches, and empirical findings.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 137 Issues in Science and Religion 3.0 Credits

This survey course examines the interconnections and differences of science and religion, including the scientific and religious theories of such topics as Cosmology, Human Origins, Prayer and Consciousness. Fundamental to the exploration of these theories are the examination of the historical, philosophical, psychological and sociological implications of these topics for society.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 150 Sex and Society 3.0 Credits

This course examines how sexualities are socially produced and re-produced. Topics of study include gender and sexuality; changing social meanings of variant sexual orientations and practices; the effect of birth-control technologies, sexually transmitted infections and sexual violence on sexual norms; the commodification of sex and the social control of sex.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 204 Criminology 3.0 Credits

Criminology is the scientific study of crime, criminal behavior and societal responses to crime and to crime victims. Students will study theories of crime causation, crime types, ethics of research, data collection and methods of crime prevention and control. Issues such as capital punishment, gun control and restorative justice will be debated.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 205 Criminology & Criminal Justice 3.0 Credits

Introduces the scientific study of crime and criminals. Analyzes the theoretical and empirical literature on causation and control. Examines our criminal justice system and approaches to corrections.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 210 Race and Ethnic Relations 3.0 Credits

Examines cultural diversity, racial and ethnic identity; racism, discrimination and prejudice, as well as minority-majority group relations both globally and at home. Special attention will be paid to the history and present status of various major racial and ethnic groups in the United States including African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans as well as "white" ethnicities.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 215 Sociology of Work 3.0 Credits

Examines the transformation of work in 21st century America. Focuses on problems of the "post industrial" workforce: big service sector, shrinking real wages, huge growth in temporary and part-time jobs. Special attention to global factors affecting the career path of recent college graduates.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 220 Wealth and Power 3.0 Credits

Examines the extent of differences in wealth and political power in modern society and looks at the origins and implications of those differences.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 225 Sociology of Technology & Aging 3.0 Credits

This course will provide and introduction to the emerging field of "gerontechnology," i.e., technological tools designed to help older and chronically ill persons maximize their independence and manage their health issues. Special attention will be paid to the social, policy, design and ethical aspects of technology acceptance and implementation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 230 Women & Men in a Changing Society 3.0 Credits

Explores the status and roles of modern women and men, with emphasis on changes in family relationships, career options, and lifestyle alternatives.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 235 Sociology of Health 3.0 Credits

Examines the history, economics, and politics of our health-care system and the effects of technology on the quality of health care.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: SOC 101 [Min Grade: D] or ANTH 101 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 240 Urban Sociology 3.0 Credits

Provides an overview of the contemporary process of urban change and of key problems and policy issues. Concentrates on five concerns: the evolution of urban economics; life and culture in the city today; race, ethnicity, gender, and class of urban populations; urban politics and social forces; and new directions in urban development.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 250 Research Methods I 3.0 Credits

Covers research design, measurement, sampling, survey research, field experiments, content analysis, interviewing techniques and ethics pertaining to research on human subjects. Prepares students to carry out simple empirical research projects as well as to become more sophisticated readers of sociological research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory 3.0 Credits

Critically examines the ideas of the classical sociological theorists (e.g., Marx, Durkheim, and Weber). This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 268 Sociology of Sport 3.0 Credits

The course examines the cultural and social aspects of sport. Students will be introduced to sport as a ubiquitous institution in American society as well as the essential characteristics and functions of sport from both a sociological and historic perspective.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 270 Theory of Applied and Community Sociology 3.0 Credits

Introduces the theory and methods of participatory research, focusing on exemplary case studies. The roots of participatory sociology in liberation theology, feminism, and Deweyian pragmatism are presented.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 275 Issues in Domestic Violence 3.0 Credits

Domestic Violence is a major public health problem. This course will describe DV in the context of multiple response systems including health care, police, advocacy, and criminal justice. We will explore how DV affects men, women and children and examine societal conditions that allow DV to occur and continue.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 310 Topics in Political Sociology 3.0 Credits

Examines social bases of politics; political power, bureaucracy, and social structure; sources and development of democracy and dictatorship; and political attitudes, movements, and parties.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 4 times for 12 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 311 Topics in Sociology of Religion 3.0 Credits

Examines the sociological basis of religion, religious thought and movements as well as the organization and social function of religion on social institutions and groups.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 4 times for 12 credits

SOC 312 Topics in Sociology of Science and Technology 3.0 Credits

Examines the sociological basis of scientific theorizing, knowledge production and research as well as the organization and social function of scientific labor and the impact of applied science on social institutions and groups.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 4 times for 12 credits

SOC 315 HIV/AIDS and Africa 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the social construction of HIV/AIDS – it explores the culture, social, epidemiologic, political, psychological, philosophical, economic, public health, and public policy dimensions of HIV/AIDS on a global level, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Students examine case studies, interviews and documentaries on HIV/AIDS in Africa.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: SOC 101 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 320 Sociology of Deviant Behavior 3.0 Credits

Examines theories of deviance, focusing on their attribution of causation and the implications for correction and/or control at both the individual and societal levels. Includes topics such as alcoholism, mental illness, criminality, and other deviant behaviors.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 325 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning 3.0 Credits

This course serves to introduce students to the field of urban and environmental planning. In doing so, this course seeks to expose students to the skill sets used by planners: including the planning process; citizens participation models; community needs assessment; data analysis and presentation; plan implementation and evaluation; and professional ethics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 326 Cities and Sustainability 3.0 Credits

This course will provide an overview of the issue of sustainability planning and policy for cities. Topics include how we define sustainability for cities, and how we measure its progress and impacts. The course will also cover how land reuse planning impacts the development of green space, including parks, gardens and urban agriculture, as well as green building, the green economy and the impact of sustainability planning on public health outcomes.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 330 Developing Nations and the International Division of Labor 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the ways in which the international economy affects the class structure, politics, and development of developing nations. Focuses particularly on multinational corporations and on the successes and failures of import-substitution and export-oriented industrialization programs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 335 Sociology of Education I 3.0 Credits

First course of a two-term sequence. Provides a general introduction to the sociology of education through the study of social, political, and cultural forces operating on public education in the United States and Britain. Examines theories, methods, and case studies to explore issues of identity formation, inequality, and class reproduction in an attempt to understand the role of schooling in contemporary life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 336 Sociology of Education II 3.0 Credits

Continues SOC 335. Students will be involved as literacy coaches tutoring critical literacy skills. Upon completion of 40 hours of tutoring, students will receive a Certificate of Literacy Teaching.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: SOC 335 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 340 Globalization 3.0 Credits

This course investigates the causal factors for the emergence of what is known as globalization, global economy, global village, etc. It covers the effects of global changes on national political systems, on ecology and on local cultures. The role of the US and reactions to the new world order will also be considered.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 341 Environmental Movements in America 3.0 Credits

Focuses on key collective actors and institutions that are involved in the creation of U.S. environmental policies, including historical and cultural processes of change involving social movements, environmental advocacy organizations, foundations, and the media.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 343 The American Experience of the Wilderness 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the ecological systems and the biodiversity; various social constructions and ideologies surrounding the idea of wilderness that inform practices toward nature; and the development of wilderness protection efforts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 344 Social Movements 3.0 Credits

Focuses on historical and social processes by which social movements arise, set in motion of social change, and the outcomes of social movement efforts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 345 Sociology of the Environment 3.0 Credits

Examines acts of nature vs. acts of man, food and health, environmental politics, social movements and environmental issues, environmental and development policies, and environmental and global change.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 346 Environmental Justice 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the political economy of environmental injustice and the impact of social movements addressing it; impact of chemical pollutants on human health; and the scientific and legal issues surrounding the study and regulation of pollutants.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

SOC 347 Introduction to Environmental Policy Analysis 3.0 Credits

Introduction the development and implementation of U.S. environmental policy, including historical development, political process, methods of analysis and creation of laws, regulations and budgets.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 349 Sociology of Disasters 3.0 Credits

Focuses on social aspects of disasters, such as: collective behaviors (panic, crime, improvisation); warning, evacuation and perception of risk; social responses to natural and technical disasters; scientific uncertainties and technical disasters; social produced age, gender, racial/ethnic and social class vulnerabilities to disaster; terrorism-caused disasters; and disaster preparedness and prevention.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 350 Research Methods II 3.0 Credits

Building on Research Methods (SOC 250) this course provides the student with the opportunity to apply research methods by implementing their own individual and group projects. Focus is on research design, developing research questions and hypotheses, instrument construction, data collection, simple data analysis and reporting.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: SOC 250 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 364 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on using specialized software for organizing and manipulating empirical databases as well as performing basic applied statistical analyses. Attention will be paid to the selection, set up, execution and interpretation of procedures for both univariate and bivariate analysis. These procedures will include, but not be limited to, univariate measures of central tendency and dispersion; categorical data analysis; t-tests and crosstabulation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: SOC 250 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 365 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Building on SOC 364, this course covers more advanced statistical techniques such as regression, correlation, analysis of variance and multiple regression.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: SOC 364 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 370 Practicum in Applied and Community Sociology 0.5-5.0 Credits

This course is central to the newly adopted emphasis of the sociology major on participatory research. These courses are intended as the practicum and supervised project-oriented research work for community organizations and agencies.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

SOC 380 Special Topics in Sociology 3.0 Credits

This course will explore current issues and debates in Sociology. It will be conducted as a seminar. The topic will vary each term.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

SOC 395 Seminar in Sociology 3.0 Credits

The sociology majors' seminar is taken every year for repeating credit. A peer monitored seminar in which students discuss and support each other's research and scholarship. It features guest faculty and non faculty discussants, and provides majors with a focused exposure to the process of research and scholarship.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 5 times for 15 credits
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is SOC.

SOC 435 Seminar - Organization of American States 3.0 Credits

Prepares students to participate in a model session of the Organization of American States (OAS). Covers international political economy, structure and operation of OAS, characteristics of designated country, and public speaking and debate. Open to students in international area studies and sociology. May be repeated for credit.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is COMM or major is IAS or major is SOC.

SOC 460 [WI] Contemporary Social Theory 3.0 Credits

Covers a broad range of theories that guide contemporary sociological thought This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: SOC 260 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 470 Social Change & Planning 3.0 Credits

This course will focus on sociological scholarship that either explains social change or seeks to promote social change through applied research or planning. The format of the course is an advanced seminar in which students will produce a series of participatory reaction papers to a variety of presentations by faculty and guest presenters.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.

SOC 490 Sociology Research Seminar I 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

SOC 491 Sociology Research Seminar II 4.0 Credits

Continuation of SOC 490.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: SOC 490 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 492 Sociology Research Seminar III 4.0 Credits

Continuation of SOC 491.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: SOC 491 [Min Grade: D]

SOC 495 Directed Studies in Sociology 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides supervised study that allows students to explore topics of their own choosing individually.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Culture and Communication Faculty

Ronald Bishop, III, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Investigative reporting, sports journalism, journalism history, journalism sourcing patterns, textual narrative and ideological analysis, cultural history of fame.
Joan W. Blumberg, BA (Pennsylvania State University) Coordinator of the Publication Management Program. Instructor. Publishing, electronic publishing, publishing and communications, publishing and mass-media.
Robert J. Brulle, PhD (George Washington University). Professor. Environmental policy and politics, critical theory, marine risk, social movements, environmental sociology.
Karen Cristiano, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Journalism, medical writing, feature writing, copy editing, mass media and society.
Robert D'Ovidio, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. The intersection of computer technology, crime, and the criminal justice system.
Daniela De Pau, PhD (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). Assistant Teaching Professor. Italian cinema, relationship between literature, cinema and other arts, traveling literature, women writers, the tradition of the Comic and the tradition of the Fantastic, autobiography, politics of immigration, cultural identity in contemporary Italy.
Brenda Dyer, MA (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Language acquisition pedagogy, teaching writing, seventeenth and eighteenth century French literature, women writers, translation.
Mary Ebeling, PhD (University of Surrey). Associate Professor. Science and technology studies; emerging technologies and biocapital; media and democratic cultures; radical social movements; sociology of markets; political sociology; and ethnographic methodologies.
Paul Evangelista, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Public relations, communication theory, new technologies in communication (classroom and online); business communication.
Richard Forney Instructor. Broadcast journalism technology and the effects of new technologies on personal and corporate communication skills.
Alexander Friedlander, PhD (Carnegie Mellon University) Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. Associate Professor. Rhetorical theory and practice, document design, writing and technology.
Anthony Glascock, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) Coordinator of the Anthropology Program. Professor. Aging and health, definitions of functionality and impairment, technology and aging, social organization, Ireland, East Africa.
Ernest A. Hakanen, PhD (Temple University) Director of Culture & Communication Graduate Programs. Professor. Telecommunications policy, adolescent media use, communication theory and history, global media, and semiotics.
Julia Hall, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Criminal justice and juvenile justice reform, including community based alternatives to incarceration, correctional education and programming, reentry and reintegration, restorative justice, and issues relating to special needs offenders, including the el
Maria Hnaraki, PhD (Indiana University) Director of Greek Studies. Associate Teaching Professor. Ethnomusicology, modern Greek language, Greek and Cretan culture.
Barbara Jean Hoekje, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of English Language Center. Associate Professor. Sociolinguistic theory, discourse analysis, applied linguistics (language teaching, learning, and testing).
Barbara Hornum, PhD (Bryn Mawr College) Director of Center for Academic Excellence (DCAE). Associate Professor. Comparative gerontology, planned communities, continuing care communities, retirement, faculty development.
Robert J. Kane, PhD (Temple University) Director, Criminal Justice Program. Professor. Police authority and accountability; urban ecology and sociology; violence and public health; police strategies and practices.
Frank Kelley, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Corporate university systems online, power structure of media enterprises, public relations, event planning.
Emmanuel F. Koku, PhD (University of Toronto). Associate Professor. Social network analysis; qualitative/quantitative research; medical sociology; social epidemiology; social demography; sociology of development; communication and information technology; community and urban sociology.
David Kutzik, PhD (Temple University) Coordinator of the Sociology Program. Professor. Sociology and philosophy of science; applied gerontological research; political economy of health care; microprocessor-based assistive technologies to improve case management and increase independent living among frail populations.
Brent Luvaas, PhD (UCLA). Assistant Professor. DIY and independent media production; transnational consumer culture; popular music; new media and mediated subjectivities; youth culture in the US and Indonesia.
Joanna Lyskowicz, MA (UAM Poznan, Poland). Instructor. Comparative linguistics, translation, business Spanish, medical Spanish, modern Spanish literature, XXth cent. Spanish poetry, magical realism in Latin American literature.
Diamantino Machado, PhD (Temple University). Teaching Professor. Globalization, political economy, political sociology, philosophy of social science, postmodernism and social reflection.
Maria delaluz Matus-Mendoza, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. Spanish Linguistic variation in the US; the relationship between language variation and mobility (social and geographical) among the Mexican communities in Mexico and in the United States; second language acquisition; language variation in media.
Jack Maxwell, MS (Saint Joseph 's University). Teaching Professor. Criminal investigations, policing, police administration, domestic violence.
Jordan McClain, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Media framing and music journalism; relationship between television and music; American popular culture; celebrity, consumerism, and consumer behavior; branding, brand positioning, and advertising criticism.
Margaret McClure, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Teaching Professor. Research methods, sociology of the family, deviance, military sociology.
Usha Menon, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Self, identity & personhood, emotional functioning, Hindu morality, gender relations in Hindu society, adult development, popular Hinduism, post-colonial feminism, Hindu religious nationalism and Islamic radicalism.
Alexander Nikolaev, PhD (Florida State University). Associate Professor. Public relations, political communication, organizational communication, mass communication, international communications and negotiations, communications theory.
Anne-Marie Obajtek-Kirkwood, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Professor. French and francophone 20th and 21st century literature, culture and film. Representations of the Occupation (WWII); war; minorities in France; autobiography; feminist issues.
Rakhmiel Peltz, PhD (Columbia University, Linguistics; University of Pennsylvania, Biological Sciences) Director of Judaic Studies Program. Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, social history of Yiddish language and culture, Yiddish culture of Eastern Europe, language planning, language and ethnic identity, language and group memory, aging and ethnicity, history of urban neighbors.
Douglas V. Porpora, PhD (Temple University). Professor. International political economy, culture, social theory, and philosophy of social science.
Robert Powell, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Early and Middle Bronze Age Crete; archaeoastronomy; early state formation; archaeology and anthropology of frontiers; mass communication.
Devon Powers, PhD (New York University). Assistant Professor. Popular music, cultural intermediaries, promotional culture, 20th-century history, journalism studies.
Rachel R. Reynolds, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago). Associate Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, intercultural communication, globalization and the rhetoric of community, political economy of immigration, race and ethnicity, new African immigrants in the United States, Igbo studies.
Cynthia Reed Rickards, MS (St. Joesph's University) Criminal Justice Program. Assistant Teaching Professor. On-line pedagogy; service-learning pedagogy; juvenile justice; domestic violence.
David Ridgway, MS (St. Joseph's University). Instructor. Deviant behaviors, social problems.
Rosemary Rys Instructor. Public relations and marketing.
Simone Schlichting-Artur, EdD (University of Pennsylvania) Assistant Department Head, Culture and Communication. Teaching Professor. International business communication (Germany and the U.S.), public health policy and languages, German post-war history through film and literature, development of writing assessment tools for German minor.
Mimi Sheller, PhD (New School for Social Research) Director of the Mobilities Research and Policy Center at Drexel University. Professor. Sustainable mobility and mobility justice: new cultures and infrastructures of travel, transport, mobile communication, and urbanism; Caribbean Studies: history, culture and political theory of the region, including intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class.
Natsumi Shor Assistant Teaching Professor. Business and professional Japanese; Japanese film and culture; interrelation between Japanese language to the nation’s culture and thought.
Wesley Shumar, PhD (Temple University) Department Head, Culture and Communication. Professor. Ethnography of cyberspace, online learning communities, political economy of higher education, globalization, activity theory, semiotics, critical realism, psychoanalysis, identity and the self.
Diane Sicotte, PhD (Arizona State University). Associate Professor. Sociology of environmental injustice: inequalities in the citing of environmental hazards; community-based research in neighborhoods dealing with industrial hazards; sociology of the environment; urban sociology; social inequalities.
Lawrence Souder, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technical writing, communication ethics.
Allan Stegeman, MA (University of Houston) Coordinator of the Communication Program. Teaching Professor. Communication, technology and mass media, video.
Robert Stokes, PhD (Rutgers University) Coordinator, Environmental Policy Program. Associate Professor. Economic and community development, sustainability planning and governance, urban planning and public health, public security and violence prevention.
Judith Storniolo, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Teaching Professor. Historical and comparative linguistics, Mesoamerican languages and culture, applied anthropology, public policy, oral traditions and narratives, ideology and ritual, Mesoamerican ethnohistory; and pre-Columbian literature.
Asta Zelenkauskaite, PhD (Indiana University). Assistant Professor. Social media; user-generated content; computer-mediated communication; interactivity; active audience analysis; mobile communication; gender and online identity; prosumer culture; internet of things; quantitative/qualitative research.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Tony H. Grubesic, PhD (The Ohio State University) Director of the Center for Spatial Analytics and Geocomputation (CSAG). Professor. Geographic information science, spatial analysis, development, telecommunication policy, location modeling.
Michelle Sahl, PhD, MEd, MBA, MBE (The University of the Sciences in Philadelphia). Assistant Teaching Professor. Health management and policy: management and leadership of health services organizations, urban health, and the history of health care systems.
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