Mechanical Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME): 192.5 quarter credits

About the Program

The role of the mechanical engineer in today’s society is rapidly changing. Advances in manufacturing, transportation, infrastructure systems, materials, communications, and high-performance computing have introduced new demands, opportunities, and challenges for mechanical engineers. What was once an individual endeavor has now become a team activity. Today’s industries require that mechanical engineers possess diverse interdisciplinary skills, a global viewpoint, entrepreneurial and managerial abilities, and an understanding of the forces governing the marketplace.

Traditionally, mechanical engineers have been associated with industries like automotive, transportation, and power generation, and with activities involving the design, analysis, and manufacturing of products useful to society. While today such activities are still dominated by mechanical engineers, the spectrum of opportunities for these professionals has expanded tremendously. For example, mechanical engineers are involved in the design and analysis of biomedical instrumentation, electronic components, smart structures, and advanced materials; they are involved in sophisticated studies of human motion, control of satellites, and the development of more efficient energy-transfer techniques.

Drexel’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics prides itself on providing its students with a comprehensive program of courses, laboratories, design projects, and co-op experiences. The MEM curriculum is designed to balance technical breadth (provided by a set of fundamental required core courses) with technical depth (provided by optional concentrations that emphasize particular fields within the profession). Thus, the MEM program not only prepares its graduates to become successful mechanical engineers needed in industry and government, but also provides an excellent springboard to pursue graduate studies in medical sciences, law, business, information technology, and any other disciplines where technological and analytical skills play an important role.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics of Drexel University is to transfer and acquire knowledge through: (a) the education of engineers for leadership in industry, business, academia, and government; and (b) the establishment of internationally recognized research programs. This mission is accomplished by the delivery of an outstanding curriculum, by the participation of our students in one of the nation’s most prestigious co-operative educational programs, and by the scholarly activities of the faculty.

Program Educational Objectives

  • Graduates will be successful in careers that deal with the design, simulation and analysis of engineering systems, experimentation and testing, manufacturing, technical services, and research.
  • Graduates will enter and complete academic and professional programs in engineering, business, management, law and medicine.
  • Graduates will communicate effectively with peers and be successful working with and leading multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural teams.
  • Graduates will recognize the global, legal, societal, and ethical contexts of their work.
  • Graduates will advance in their careers; for example, assuming increasing levels of responsibility and acquiring professional licensure. 

Student Outcomes

The department’s student outcomes reflect the skills and abilities that the curriculum is designed to provide to students by the time they graduate. These are:   

a)            an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;

b)            an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;

c)            an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;

d)            an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;

e)            an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;

f)             an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;

g)            an ability to communicate effectively;

h)            the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;

i)             a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;

j)             a knowledge of contemporary issues;

k)            an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for mechanical engineering and mechanics practice.

Additional Information

The Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

For additional information about this major, contact:

Angela Thomas
athomas@coe.drexel.edu
215.895.2336
Randell 115

Sheena Butler
sbutler@coe.drexel.edu
215.895.1474
Randell 115

Degree Requirements 

The mechanical engineering and mechanics curriculum is designed to balance technical breadth (provided by a set of fundamental required core courses) with technical depth (provided by optional concentrations that emphasize particular fields within the profession).


General Education/Liberal Studies Requirements
HIST 285Technology in Historical Perspective3.0
ENGL 101Expository Writing and Reading3.0
ENGL 102Persuasive Writing and Reading3.0
ENGL 103Analytical Writing and Reading3.0
PHIL 315Engineering Ethics3.0
UNIV E101The Drexel Experience2.0
General Education Requirements *12.0
Mathematics Requirements
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
Physics Requirements
PHYS 101Fundamentals of Physics I4.0
PHYS 102Fundamentals of Physics II4.0
PHYS 201Fundamentals of Physics III4.0
Chemistry/Biology Requirements
CHEM 101General Chemistry I3.5
CHEM 102General Chemistry II4.5
BIO 141Essential Biology4.5
Design/Laboratory Requirements
CS 121Computation Laboratory I1.0
CS 122Computation Laboratory II1.0
CS 123Computation Laboratory III1.0
ENGR 100Beginning Computer Aided Drafting for Design1.0
ENGR 101Engineering Design Laboratory I2.0
ENGR 102Engineering Design Laboratory II2.0
ENGR 103Engineering Design Laboratory III2.0
Engineering Requirements
ENGR 201Evaluation & Presentation of Experimental Data I3.0
ENGR 202Evaluation & Presentation of Experimental Data II3.0
ENGR 210Introduction to Thermodynamics3.0
ENGR 231Linear Engineering Systems3.0
ENGR 232Dynamic Engineering Systems3.0
Engineering Economics Requirements
CIVE 240 [WI] Engineering Economic Analysis3.0
Materials Requirements
ENGR 220Fundamentals of Materials4.0
Mechanical Requirements
MEM 201Foundations of Computer Aided Design3.0
MEM 202Engineering Mechanics-Statics3.0
MEM 220Basic Fluid Mechanics4.0
MEM 230Mechanics of Materials I4.0
MEM 238Dynamics4.0
MEM 255Introduction to Controls4.0
MEM 310Thermodynamic Analysis I4.0
MEM 311Thermal Fluid Science Laboratory2.0
MEM 331Experimental Mechanics I2.0
MEM 351Dynamic Systems Laboratory I2.0
MEM 333Mechanical Behavior of Materials3.0
MEM 345Heat Transfer4.0
MEM 355Performance Enhancement of Dynamic Systems4.0
MEM 361Engineering Reliability3.0
MEM 435Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing4.0
MEM 491 [WI] Senior Design Project I3.0
MEM 492 [WI] Senior Design Project II3.0
MEM 493 [WI] Senior Design Project III3.0
Elective Courses
MEM Fundamental Courses **12.0
MEM Open Electives (Any two MEM courses 300 level or higher.)6.0-8.0
COE Electives (Any 2 College of Engineering courses, including MEM courses, 300 level or higher.)6.0-8.0
Math/Science Electives (300+ level MATH, PHYS, BIO, CHEM, CHEC, and ENVS.)6.0-8.0
Free Electives6.0-8.0
Total Credits192.5


*

General Education Requirements.

**

All MEM students must complete a minimum of four of the MEM Fundamentals courses. (See List Below)


MEM Fundamental Courses
Select four of the following:
Fluid Dynamics I
Mechanics of Materials II
Thermodynamic Analysis II
Introduction to Microfabrication
Mechanics of Vibration
Machine Design I
Manufacturng Process I
Thermal Systems Design
Micro-Based Control Systems I
Micro-Based Control Systems II


Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study

 

5 YR UG Co-op Concentration

Term 1Credits
CHEM 101General Chemistry I3.5
CS 121Computation Laboratory I1.0
ENGL 101Expository Writing and Reading3.0
ENGR 100Beginning Computer Aided Drafting for Design1.0
ENGR 101Engineering Design Laboratory I2.0
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
UNIV E101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits15.5
Term 2
CHEM 102General Chemistry II4.5
COOP 001Co-op Essentials0.0
CS 122Computation Laboratory II1.0
ENGL 102Persuasive Writing and Reading3.0
ENGR 102Engineering Design Laboratory II2.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
PHYS 101Fundamentals of Physics I4.0
UNIV E101The Drexel Experience0.5
 Term Credits19.0
Term 3
BIO 141Essential Biology4.5
CS 123Computation Laboratory III1.0
ENGL 103Analytical Writing and Reading3.0
ENGR 103Engineering Design Laboratory III2.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
PHYS 102Fundamentals of Physics II4.0
UNIV E101The Drexel Experience0.5
 Term Credits19.0
Term 4
ENGR 201Evaluation & Presentation of Experimental Data I3.0
ENGR 220Fundamentals of Materials4.0
ENGR 231Linear Engineering Systems3.0
MEM 202Engineering Mechanics-Statics3.0
PHYS 201Fundamentals of Physics III4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 5
ENGR 202Evaluation & Presentation of Experimental Data II3.0
ENGR 210Introduction to Thermodynamics3.0
ENGR 232Dynamic Engineering Systems3.0
MEM 201Foundations of Computer Aided Design3.0
MEM 238Dynamics4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
CIVE 240 [WI] Engineering Economic Analysis3.0
HIST 285Technology in Historical Perspective3.0
MEM 230Mechanics of Materials I4.0
MEM 310Thermodynamic Analysis I4.0
Free Elective 3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 7
MEM 220Basic Fluid Mechanics4.0
MEM 255Introduction to Controls4.0
MEM 331Experimental Mechanics I2.0
MEM 333Mechanical Behavior of Materials3.0
PHIL 315Engineering Ethics3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
MEM 311Thermal Fluid Science Laboratory2.0
MEM 355Performance Enhancement of Dynamic Systems4.0
MEM 435Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing4.0
MEM 345Heat Transfer4.0
MEM Fundamentals Course*3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 9
MEM 351Dynamic Systems Laboratory I2.0
MEM 361Engineering Reliability3.0
Two MEM Fundamentals Courses*6.0
General Education Elective*3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 10
MEM 491 [WI] Senior Design Project I3.0
General Education Elective*3.0
A MEM or College of Engineering Elective (300+) 3.0
MEM Fundamentals Course*3.0
Math/Science Course*3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
MEM 492 [WI] Senior Design Project II3.0
General Education Elective*3.0
Any 300-level or Higher MEM Elective 3.0
A MEM or College of Engineering Elective (300+) 3.0
Math/Science Course*3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
MEM 493 [WI] Senior Design Project III3.0
Free Electives 3.0
Any 300-level or Higher MEM Elective 3.0
General Education Elective*3.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 192.5

 

*

 See degree requirements.

 

Co-op/Career Opportunities

Mechanical engineers are employed in a growing number of areas, including aerospace, automotive, biomechanics, computer systems, electronic entertainment, energy, environmental, health care, manufacturing, nuclear technology, and utilities.

Most mechanical engineering graduates begin full-time employment immediately upon graduation. However, there are a number of graduates who go on to pursue master’s and/or doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering.The graduate schools that Drexel’s mechanical engineers have attended include Harvard, UC Berkeley, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Dual/Accelerated Degree

Accelerated Program

The Accelerated Program of the College of Engineering provides opportunities for highly talented and strongly motivated students to progress toward their educational goals essentially at their own pace. These options include opportunities for accelerated studies, dual degrees, a combined bachelor's/master's program as well as participation in the University Honors Program.

Primarily through advanced placement, credit by examination, flexibility of scheduling, and independent study, the "fast track" makes it possible to complete the undergraduate curriculum and initiate graduate study in less than the five years required by the standard curriculum.

Dual Degree Bachelor's Programs

With careful planning, you can complete two full degrees in the time usually required to complete one. The double major option works best in closely related areas. For detailed information please contact your advisor.

Bachelor's/Master's Dual Degree Program

Exceptional students can also pursue a master of science degree in the same period as the bachelor of science. For MEM undergraduate students, the following are the possible graduate programs for the Master's degree in the BS/MS dual degree program:

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Engineering Management
  • Material Science Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering

For more information about this program, visit the Department's BS /MS Dual Degree Program page.

Minor in Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

Any undergraduate student in good standing who has completed more than 30.0 credits at Drexel may apply for the minor in mechanical engineering. 

The minor must contain a minimum of 24.0 MEM credits according to the following distribution: (a) 16.0 credits from any four of the 4-credit required course options; (b) at least eight credits from additional required courses or from the laboratory components and recommended electives.

Required Course Options
Select four of the following:16.0
Basic Fluid Mechanics
Mechanics of Materials I
Dynamics
Introduction to Controls
Thermodynamic Analysis I
Heat Transfer
Performance Enhancement of Dynamic Systems
Engineering Reliability
Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing
Select three of the following:8.0
Laboratories
Thermal Fluid Science Laboratory
Experimental Mechanics I
Dynamic Systems Laboratory I
Recommended Electives
Fluid Dynamics I
Mechanics of Materials II
Engineering Reliability
Thermodynamic Analysis II
Aerodynamics
Mechanics of Vibration
Aircraft Design & Performance
Advanced Stress Analysis
Manufacturng Process I
Manufacturing Process II
Thermal Systems Design
Aircraft Flight Dynamics & Control I
Introduction to Robotics
Micro-Based Control Systems I
Micro-Based Control Systems II
Introduction to Engineering Management
Total Credits24.0

Facilities

Advanced Design and Manufacturing Laboratory
This laboratory provides research opportunities in design ethodology,computer-aided design, analysis and manufacturing, and materials processing and manufacturing. Facilities include various computers and software, I-DEAS, Pro/E,ANSYS, MasterCAM, Mechanical DeskTop, SurfCAM, Euclid, Strim, ABQUS, and more.The machines include two Sanders Model Maker rapid prototyping machines, a BridgePort CNC Machining Center, a BOY 220 injection molding machine, an Electra high-temperature furnace for metal sintering, infiltration, and other heat treatment.

Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory
The biofluid mechanics laboratory conducts computational and experimental research on the dynamics of flow in the cardiovascular and respiratory system, and the effects of flow on biological processes, particularly hemostasis and thrombosis. Lab resources include high-performance engineering workstations, commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and basic experimental facilities including Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), pressure and flow transducers, pumps, and microscopes.

Biomechanics Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on understanding the mechanical properties of human joints, characterization of the mechanical properties of biological materials, studies of human movements, and design and development of artificial limbs. Facilities include a 3-D kinematic measuring system, Instron testing machine, and microcomputers for data acquisition and processing. Additional biomechanical laboratory facilities are available at Moss Rehab

Combustion and Fuels Chemistry Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on developing an understanding of both the chemical and physical factors that control and, hence, can be used to tailor combustion processes for engineering applications. Facilities include continuous spectroscopic reaction monitoring systems, static reactors, combustion bombs, flat flame burner systems, flow reactors, and complete analytical and monitoring instrumentation.

Combustion and Thermal-Science Laboratory
Research is conducted in the areas of (1) low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation, (2) cool flames, (3) auto-ignition, (4) flame instabilities, (5) flame structure, (6) flame ignition, and (7) flame extinction (quelching). New ways to improve fuel efficiency in practical combustors and recover waste energy in the transportation sector are also being explored.

Combustion Emissions/Engine Laboratory
In this laboratory the effects of engine operating variables, fuel type, ambient conditions, and control devices on engine performance and emissions are studied. The laboratory contains both diesel and spark ignition engines, as well as extensive engine and emissions monitoring instrumentation, including dynamometers and continuous gaseous emission analyzers. The laboratory has a high-pressure flow reactor for detailed kinetic studies of hydrocarbon oxidation processes in engines.

Composite Mechanics Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on the characterization of performance of composite materials. Current interest includes damage mechanisms, failure processes, and time-dependent behavior in resin-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix composites. Major equipment includes servo-hydraulic and electromechanical Instron testing machines, strain/displacement monitoring systems, environmental chambers, microcomputers for data acquisition and processing, composites fabrication facility, interferometric displacement gauge, X-radiography, and acoustic emission systems.

Drexel Plasma Institute

The Drexel Plasma Institute (DPI) was formed in 2002 to stimulate and coordinate research projects related to plasma and other modern high energy engineering techniques. Today the DPI is an active multidisciplinary organization involving 23 faculty members from 6 engineering departments working in close collaboration with School of Biomedical Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences and College of Nursing and Health Professions.

Heat Transfer Laboratory
The heat transfer laboratory is outfitted with an array of instrumentation and equipment for conducting single- and multiphase heat transfer experiments in controlled environments. Facilities include computer-controlled data acquisition (LabVIEW and MacAdios) systems, a Newport holographic interferometric system with associated lasers and optics, image enlargers, power amplifiers, precision voltmeters, slip-ring assemblies, and an IBM RISC/6000 workstation for large-scale computing and simulation. A draft-free room is available with independent temperature control for carrying out natural convection experiments. An experimental test-rig is available for studying heat transfer from rotating surfaces. A bubble column has been recently built to study multiphase flow and heat transfer problems. Facilities are also available for measuring thermal conductivities of thin films using a thermal comparator.

Industrial Robot Performance Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on determining the relationship between robot design parameters and performance criteria.

Microcomputer Controls Laboratory
This laboratory provides an environment conducive to appreciating aspects of systems and control through hands-on experiments. They range from data acquisition and processing to modeling of dynamical systems and implementing a variety of controllers to control systems, such as DC motors and the inverted pendulum. Active research is being conducted on control reconfiguration in the event of actuator failures in aircrafts.

Non-Newtonian Fluid and Heat Transfer Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on the study of hydrodynamic and thermal performance of various non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluids in complex flow geometries. Facilities and equipment include a 20-foot-long recirculating flow loop with a 500-gallon reservoir tank and a thermal conductivity measurement cell. A complete data acquisition system provides fully automated experimental operation and data reduction. State-of-the-art finite element codes provide three-dimensional flow and heat transfer simulations of flows in complex geometrics, with a complete post-processing graphic capability backed by template.

Polymer Processing Laboratory
This laboratory is devoted to understanding the basic controlling parameters in polymer processing and the procedures for communicating between the automated processing machine and the rest of the manufacturing facilities, such as the material handling system and the intelligent monitoring system. Facilities include a BOY 55-ton injection molding machine with necessary equipment for processing fiber-reinforced polymers, an IBM microcomputer for data acquisition and control, a Macintosh II microcomputer with software for mold design and process simulation, a Brookfield digital viscometer, and a Tinius Olsen tensile strength tester for material property evaluation.

Precision Instrumentation and Metrology Laboratory
This laboratory is focused on activities related to precision measurement, computer-aided inspection, and precision instrument design. Facilities include 3D Coordinate Measuring Machine (Brown & Sharpe) with Micro Measurement and Reverse engineering software, Surface Profilometer, and Laser Displacement Measuring System.

Program for Robotics, Intelligent Sensing, and Mechatronics (PRISM) Laboratory
The PRISM Laboratory is a state-of-the-art laboratory for pursuing research in the areas of medical robotics, haptic (sense of touch) and vision feedback through a user interface for augmenting a surgeon’s capability in performing surgery, and visual servoing.The laboratory is equipped with a robotic arm, haptic interface devices, head-mounted display for immersion in the surgical environment, and dedicated hardware and software for the above research areas.

Rheology Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on developing tools for rheological property measurement of various non-Newtonian fluids, including friction-reducing viscoelastic fluids, molten polymers, coal-water slurries, ceramic slurries, and bonding cements for biomedical applications. A capillary tube viscometer, falling ball and needle viscometers, and Brookfield rotating viscometer are available. In particular, the capillary tube viscometer is designed to allow fully automated operation, thus avoiding time-consuming data collection procedures. A high-temperature and high-pressure capillary tube viscometer is under development, so that viscosities of advanced polymer materials can be measured at relatively high temperatures and shear rates.

Stress Wave and Ballistics Laboratory
Emphasis in this laboratory is placed on studying the effects of stress waves in structures. Equipment and facilities include a pendulum impact system, small air gun, high-air-pressure mass accelerator, drop impact system, exploding wire, explosion chamber, and instrumented charpy impact system.

Rapid Product Development Center
This center provides fundamental research, educational instruction, and engineering services in product design and manufacturing, solid freeform fabrication, and computer-aided tissue engineering.The center is equipped with state-of-the-art CAD/CAE/CAM, medical imaging processing, and 3D reconstruction software, and a rapid prototyping system.

Courses

MEM 201 Foundations of Computer Aided Design 3.0 Credits

Covers application of modern, computer-aided graphics techniques and the use of state-of-the-art, computer-aided design/drafting package(s). Includes topics such as principles of computer-aided design/drafting and interactions with computer-aided manufacturing, rapid prototyping, and other modern manufacturing processes; engineering graphics and graphics languages in computer-aided design and/or drafting; creation of a drawing environment; database and file management, editing, modification, displaying, dimensioning, plotting and printing; special editing techniques; 3-D modeling, solid modeling, shading, and rendering; and file transfer. Students must have Sophomore class standing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MEM 202 Statics 3.0 Credits

Covers two-and three-dimensional vector representation of forces, moments and couples; static equilibrium of particles, rigid bodies, and engineering structures; analysis of external and internal forces in structures via methods of free body diagrams; and properties of cross-sectional areas.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PHYS 185 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 101 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 220 Basic Fluid Mechanics 4.0 Credits

Covers general physical properties of a fluid; kinetics of fluid motion; material derivative, vorticity, strain, and dynamics of fluids; and derivation of conservation laws in control volume form with applications.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: TDEC 114 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 189 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 230 Mechanics of Materials I 4.0 Credits

Covers definitions of stress and strain, uniaxial loading, torsion, bending moments and shear forces in beams, bending stresses and shear stress in beams, and stress transformation.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 202 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 238 Dynamics 4.0 Credits

Covers kinematics and kinetics in two and three-dimensional space, force and acceleration, linear and angular momentum, and energy methods.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (MATH 189 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]) and (PHYS 111 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 185 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 101 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 255 Introduction to Controls 4.0 Credits

Introduces the concepts of modeling of mechanical, electrical, electromechanical, thermal, and hydraulic systems; linearization; state-space model; time-domain analysis; transfer functions; frequency-domain analysis; analysis of systems involving automatic control of position, speed, power, flow, pressure, temperature, and other physical quantities; basic concept of feedback; basic concept of stability; computer-aided analysis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] and (MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 261 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 231 [Min Grade: D]) and (MATH 210 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 262 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 232 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 304 Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering 3.0 Credits

An overview of the application of mechanical engineering to biological systems. Covers basic anatomy and physiology; tissue, joint, cell, and protein mechanics; joint kinematics; biofluid mechanics; biothermodynamics; biotransport; biomimetic controls; and biomanufacturing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D] and PHYS 101 [Min Grade: D] and CHEM 102 [Min Grade: D] and BIO 141 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 310 Thermodynamic Analysis I 4.0 Credits

Reviews first and second laws of thermodynamics as applied to closed systems, control volumes, and thermodynamic cycles; covers thermodynamic relations and properties of real fluids, mixtures, and solutions; introduces phase and chemical equilibrium, power and refrigeration cycles, and combustion.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGR 210 [Min Grade: D] or MEM 210 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 311 Thermal Fluid Science Laboratory 2.0 Credits

Introduces modern laboratory techniques, including statistical analysis of experimental data; thermodynamic properties and equations of state; and dynamic and static temperature measurements with potentiometers, bridge circuits, and oscilloscopes. Fall.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 320 Fluid Dynamics I 3.0 Credits

Covers equation of motion for compressible flow; static, total, and stagnation concepts; one-dimensional isentropic, normal shock, including Fanno and Rayleigh flows and choked flow; two-dimensional supersonic flow, including Prandtl-Meyer flow and oblique shocks; analysis and design of compressible flow devices, including supersonic nozzles, diffusers, wind tunnels, inlets, and combustors.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 330 Mechanics of Materials II 4.0 Credits

Reviews mechanics of materials, beam theory, combined loading, stress transformation, shear center, asymmetrical bending, deflection of beams, statically indeterminate beams, energy methods, inelastic bending, and beam column instability.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 331 Experimental Mechanics I 2.0 Credits

Covers static testing methods, including strain gages, extensometers, photoelasticity, and model analysis; practical applications of experimental stress analysis; and verification of standard materials tests, including tensile, shear, and buckling. Winter. Some or all pre-requisites may be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Please see the department for more information.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] (Can be taken Concurrently)MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 333 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3.0 Credits

Introduces the deformation and failure of engineering materials; Emphasizes application of the fundamentals to engineering design to prevent failure; Covers material damage and failure under multi-axial stresses, yielding, fracture mechanics, fatigue crack growth, fatigue life estimation, and deformation and failure of composite materials.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Pre-Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 345 Heat Transfer 4.0 Credits

Covers fundamentals of conduction, convection, and radiation; steady and unsteady heat conduction; fundamentals of boundary layer flows; introduction to forced and free convection for external and internal flows; blackbody radiation; and radiation and surface radiation properties.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: ENGR 210 [Min Grade: D] and (MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] or CIVE 320 [Min Grade: D]) and (MATH 210 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 262 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 232 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 351 Dynamic Systems Laboratory I 2.0 Credits

Includes experiments involving modeling and simulation of linear and non-linear dynamic systems, including feedback controls. Spring.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 255 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 355 Performance Enhancement of Dynamic Systems 4.0 Credits

This course introduces measures of performance of dynamical systems, means of computing/evaluation-of such measures, and how to design controllers to improve performance.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 255 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 361 Engineering Reliability 3.0 Credits

Reviews probability concepts and modeling of random phenomena, including parameter estimation, empirical determination of distribution models, catastrophic failure models, material strength and fatigue life distribution, and reliability improvement.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: MATH 290 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 261 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 231 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 371 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering I 2.0 Credits

Introduces the fundamental scientific, technical, social and ethical issues in nuclear engineering; nuclear reactions and readiation, radiation protection and control, nuclear energy production and utilization, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear materials, controlled fusion and thermonuclear plasma systems, basics of plasma physics and plasma chemistry, nuclear waste management, nuclear reactor safety, analysis of severe nuclear accidents, risk assessment and related issues of engineering ethics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PHYS 201 [Min Grade: D] and (ENGR 210 [Min Grade: D] or CHE 206 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 373 Space Systems Engineering I 3.0 Credits

Introduction to space engineering through presentation of two topics that serve as the foundation of space systems analysis and design: rocket propulsion and orbital mechanics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 374 Space Systems Engineering II 3.0 Credits

Introduction to design principles and theory of satellite systems engineering, including design theories and parameters involved in satellite development, as well as real life conditions such as applications, product assurance, assembly, and testing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 373 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 380 [WI] Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering 12.0 Credits

Selected topics that meet student interests and faculty capabilities. May be taken more than one time when the topics vary. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course in any one term when different topics are covered in each section. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MEM 395 Hess Undergraduate Scholars Research 0.5-3.0 Credits

A change for undergraduates to experience independent research as part of the MEM Hess Honors Program. Weekly group meetings to discuss the details of the research endeavor are coupled with independent student in a research laboratory. May be repeated five times for credit.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 5 times for 18 credits
Prerequisites: MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 399 Independent Study in Mechanical Engineering 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides independent study or research on a topic approved by the department.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MEM 400 Internal Combustion Engines 3.0 Credits

Covers engine types and trends, thermodynamics of engines and engine processes, ideal and actual engine processes and cycles, combustion and emissions, fuel chemistry and properties, detonation and knock, and engine testing and performance.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 402 Power Plant Design 3.0 Credits

Covers heat cycle arrangement, equipment selection, analysis of cost demands, and diversity factors. Includes economic studies of plant and cycle arrangements.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 403 Gas Turbines & Jet Propulsion 3.0 Credits

Covers fundamentals of thermodynamics and aerothermodynamics, and application to propulsion engines; thermodynamic cycles and performance analysis of gas turbines and air-breathing propulsion systems, turbojet, turboprop, ducted fan, ramjet, and ducted rocket; theory and design of ramjets, liquid and solid rockets, air-augmented rockets, and hybrid rockets; aerodynamics of flames, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of combustion reactions; supersonic combustion technology and zero-g propulsion problems; and propulsion systems comparison and evaluation for space missions.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 405 Principles of Combustion I 3.0 Credits

Covers thermochemistry, the relationship between heats of formation and bond energies, heat capacity and heats of reaction, chemical equilibrium, calculation of flame temperature, and composition of burned gas.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 410 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 406 Principles of Combustion II 3.0 Credits

Covers laminar flame propagation in premixed gases, detonation and deflagration, burning of liquid and solid fuels, and diffusion flames.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 405 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 410 Thermodynamic Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers thermodynamic analysis of ideal and real mixtures and gas phase reacting systems. Introduces equilibrium analysis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 413 HVAC Loads 3.0 Credits

Human comfort and associated models; state-of-the-art methods of calculating building peak heating and cooling loads; analysis of different psychrometric processes; different types of secondary systems: description, operating principles, modeling, simulation and sizing of secondary systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 345 [Min Grade: D] and (MEM 310 [Min Grade: D] or AE 220 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 414 HVAC Equipment 3.0 Credits

Standard and real, single-stage multistage refrigeration cycles; vapor compression components (compressor, expansion devices, condensers, and evaporators); heat pumps; absorption systems; boilers; heat exchangers; cooling coils, cooling towers; part-load energy performance; annual energy; annual energy estimation methods (degree-day, bin method, modified degree-day).

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 345 [Min Grade: D] and (MEM 310 [Min Grade: D] or AE 220 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 415 Fuel Cell Engines 3.0 Credits

Introduces fundamental aspects and operating principles of fuel cell systems, including: basic electrochemical principles, thermodynamics required for understanding the operation, components including functions and materials, electrochemical performance characteristics, analysis of system losses and efficiency, various fuel cell types, current state of technology, application areas/implementation, and current technical challenges.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: (MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] or CHE 302 [Min Grade: D] or CHE 311 [Min Grade: D] or CIVE 320 [Min Grade: D]) and MEM 310 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 417 Introduction to Microfabrication 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the fundamentals of microfabrication technologies. The materials, principles, and applications of silicon-based microfabrication technologies such as photolithography, wet/dry etching, deposition techniques, surface micromachining, and polymer micromachining are covered. This course also includes two lab sessions through which students have hands-on experiences in microfabrication.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

MEM 419 Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on design, manufacturing, and application of lab-on-a-chip systems as well as understanding microfluidic phenomena. The lecture covers novel microfluidic phenomena, microsensors, microactuators, and case studies. This course also includes two lab sessions through which student have hands-on experiences in lab-on-a-chip technology.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 417 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 420 Aerodynamics 3.0 Credits

Covers steady and unsteady flow, flow around a body, wing theory, thin airfoil theory, fundamental equation of finite-wing theory, and aerodynamic characteristics of wings. Introduces potential theory and boundary layer phenomena.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 423 Mechanics of Vibration 4.0 Credits

Covers free and forced vibrations of one-, two-, and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems; continuous systems; and transient and random vibration problems. Includes use of digital computer for homework and special class problems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] and (TDEC 222 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 232 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 210 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 262 [Min Grade: D])

MEM 424 Biomechanics 3.0 Credits

Introduces modeling of dynamics of biomechanical systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 202 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 238 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 425 Aircraft Design & Performance 3.0 Credits

Introduces aerodynamics and airfoils; steady flight; power required and power available curves; range and endurance; takeoff, glide, and landing; stick force and control-free stability; moment coefficients and derivatives; and designing to specification. Students must have Junior class standing.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

MEM 426 Aerospace Structures 3.0 Credits

Covers properties of wing and fuselage sections, torsion of thin-walled and skin-stringer multiple-cell sections, non-symmetrical bending of wing and fuselage sections, shear in thin-walled and skin-stringer sections, and buckling. Introduces matrix methods.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 427 Finite Element Methods 3.0 Credits

Introduces the fundamental theory and formulations of finite element method and its application in structural mechanics and thermal/fluid science. Topics include formulation of 1-D and 2-D elements, isoparametric elements, static and dynamic analysis of trusses, beams, and frames, 2-D plane problems, and heat transfer problems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 428 Introduction to Composites I 3.0 Credits

Introduces anisotropic elasticity, lamina stiffness and compliance, plane stress and strain, test methods, and failure criteria.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 330 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 429 Introduction to Composites II 3.0 Credits

Covers laminated plate theory, stiffness and compliance of laminated plates, effect of laminated configuration on elastic performance, and strength production.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 428 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 430 Advanced Stress Analysis 4.0 Credits

Examines three-dimensional representation of stress and strain, coordinate transformation, stress strain relationships for anisotropic and isotropic materials, equilibrium equations, boundary value problems, governing equations in plane strain and plane stress problems, Airy's stress function, two-dimensional problems in polar coordinates, and selected applications to stress analysis problems in mechanical engineering.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 330 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 431 Machine Design I 3.0 Credits

Covers static strength and fatigue theories of failure, fasteners, welded joints, springs, roller bearings, and lubricated spur gears.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Junior or Pre-Junior or Sophomore
Prerequisites: MEM 202 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 230 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 238 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 435 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing 4.0 Credits

Covers fundamental use of CAD/CAM systems for geometry definition, finite element applications, and introductory computer graphics concepts.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 201 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 436 Introduction to Computer-Aided Manufacturing 3.0 Credits

Examination of the basic elements that are used to integrate the design and manufacturing processes. Robotics computerized-numerical controlled machine, and CAD/CAM systems. Manufacturability considerations when integrating unit process elements.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 201 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 435 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 437 Manufacturng Process I 3.0 Credits

Examines the basic elements used to integrate the design and manufacturing processes; robotics, computerized-numerical-controlled machines, and CAD/CAM systems; and manufacturability considerations when integrating unit process elements.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 230 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 438 Manufacturing Process II 3.0 Credits

Covers plastics and reinforced plastics processes, theory of polymer and plastic process, simple models of polymer flows, and manufacturability of plastics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 437 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 440 Thermal Systems Design 3.0 Credits

This course covers fundamentals of thermal system design; the role of design in engineering practice; economic analysis used for design of thermal systems; advanced concepts and analysis of heat exchangers and distillation equipment; modeling of thermal systems; simulation of thermal systems; fundamentals of optimization and design of optimized thermal systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 345 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 444 Biofluid Mechanics 3.0 Credits

This course introduces flow-related anatomy and pathophysiology, and biomedical flow devices and their design challenges. Analysis methods to solve biological fluid mechanics design problems are introduced and several interdisciplinary team projects are assigned to apply fluid mechanics to practical biological or medical problems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 220 [Min Grade: D] or BMES 451 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 445 Solar Energy Fundamentals 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on basic theories of solar radiation, solar thermal energy, and photovoltaics. Students will learn basic radiation heat transfer, solar radiation, solar thermal collection and storage, passive and active solar heating/cooling, physics of photovoltaic cells, and characteristics and types of solar cells.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 345 [Min Grade: C] and PHYS 210 [Min Grade: C]

MEM 446 Fundamentals of Plasmas I 3.0 Credits

Introduces the fundamentals of plasma science and modern industrial plasma applications in electronics, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include quasi-equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, statistics, fluid dynamics and kinetics of plasma and other modern high temperature and high energy systems and processes.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PHYS 201 [Min Grade: D] or TDEC 201 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 112 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 187 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 447 Fundamentals of Plasmas II 3.0 Credits

Continues the development of the engineering fundamentals of plasma discharges applied in modern industrial plasma applications in electronics, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics include quasi-equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, statistics, fluid dynamics of major thermal and non-thermal plasma discharges, operating at low, moderate and atmospheric pressures.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 446 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 448 Applications of Thermal Plasmas 3.0 Credits

Introduces applications of modern thermal plasma processes focused on synthesis of new materials, material treatment, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics Include thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of high temperature plasma processes, engineering organization of specific modern thermal plasma technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PHYS 201 [Min Grade: D] or TDEC 201 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 112 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 187 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 449 Applications of Non-Thermal Plasmas 3.0 Credits

Application of modern non-thermal plasma processes focused on synthesis of new materials, material treatment, fuel conversion, environmental control, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Topics Include non-equilibrium thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of cold temperature plasma processes, engineering organization of specific modern non-thermal plasma technologies.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PHYS 201 [Min Grade: D] or TDEC 201 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 112 [Min Grade: D] or PHYS 187 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 453 Aircraft Flight Dynamics & Control I 3.0 Credits

Covers general equations of motion for aircraft; linearization based on small disturbance theory and modal analysis to identify longitudinal open-loop characteristics; review of classical control theory; state space analysis; and autopilot design, including classical, pole placement, and optimal.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 355 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 454 Aircarft Flight Dynamics & Control II 3.0 Credits

Covers observers; lateral dynamics; Dutch roll, roll convergence, and spiral modes; autopilot design and evaluations; and inertial cross-coupling computer simulation and analysis.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 453 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 455 Introduction to Robotics 4.0 Credits

Introduces basic concepts in robot operation and structure, including actuators, sensors, mechanical components, robot control and robot programming.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 255 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 456 Robotics II 3.0 Credits

Covers homogeneous kinematics of robots; velocities and accelerations; and static forces in manipulators, including iterative Newton-Euler formulation of manipulator dynamics.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 455 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 457 Robotics III 3.0 Credits

Covers robotic-based automated manufacturing, including robot work cell configurations, applications of robots in manufacturing, material transfer, assembly, and inspection.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 456 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 458 Micro-Based Control Systems I 3.0 Credits

Provides hands-on experience in real-time control and manipulation of hardware dynamic systems, including microcomputer, architecture, software, and device drivers. Emphasizes real-time interfacing of data acquisition and control systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 355 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 459 Micro-Based Control Systems II 3.0 Credits

Continues MEM 458. Provides real-time control and manipulation of hardware dynamic systems. Emphasizes real-time interfacing of data acquisition and control systems.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MEM 458 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 462 [WI] Introduction to Engineering Management 3.0 Credits

Introduces the general theory of management, including the processes of planning, organizing, assembling resources, supervising, and controlling. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Junior or Senior.

MEM 475 Medical Robotics I 3.0 Credits

Use of robots in surgery, safety considerations, understanding robot kinematics, analysis of surgeon performance using a robotic devices, inverse kinematics, velocity analysis, acceleration analysis, various types of surgeries case study.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 476 Medical Robotics II 3.0 Credits

Force and movement for robot arms, robot dynamics, computer vision, vision based control, combining haptics, vision and robot dynamics in a cohesive framework for the development of a medical robotic system.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 475 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 477 Haptics for Medical Robotics 3.0 Credits

Introduction to haptics, physiology of touch, actuators, sensors, non-portable force feedback, portable voice feedback, tactile feedback interfaces, haptic sensing and control.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MEM 238 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 478 Computer-Aided Tissue Engr 3.0 Credits

Introduction to the engineering aspects of tissue reengineering and integrated CAD/CAE/CAM technology applied to tissue engineering with hands-on experience combing CAD, medical image processing, 3-D reconstruction software, and solid freeform fabrication of tissue scaffolding.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.

MEM 491 [WI] Senior Design Project I 3.0 Credits

Introduces the design process, including information retrieval, problem definition, proposal writing, patents, and design notebooks. Includes presentations on problem areas by experts from industry, government, and education. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 230 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 238 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 355 [Min Grade: D] and MEM 345 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 492 [WI] Senior Design Project II 3.0 Credits

Continues MEM 491. Requires written and oral progress reports. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 491 [Min Grade: D]

MEM 493 [WI] Senior Design Project III 3.0 Credits

Continues MEM 492. Requires written and oral final reports, including oral presentations by each design team at a formal Design Conference open to the public and conducted in the style of a professional conference. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Engineering
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: MEM 492 [Min Grade: D]

Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics Faculty

Jonathan Awerbuch, DSc (Technion, Israel Institute of Technology). Professor. Mechanics of composites; fracture and fatigue; impact and wave propagation; structural dynamics.
Philipp Boettcher, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Assistant Teaching Professor. Thermal and hot surface ignition of hydrocarbons; high speed flow diagnostics; absorption and emission spectroscopy.
Nicholas P. Cernansky, PhD (University of California-Berkeley) Hess Chair Professor of Combustion. Professor. Combustion chemistry and kinetics; combustion generated pollution; utilization of alternative and synthetic fuels.
Bor-Chin Chang, PhD (Rice University). Professor. Computer-aided design of multivariable control systems; robust and optimal control systems.
Young I. Cho, PhD (University of Illinois-Chicago). Professor. Heat transfer; fluid mechanics; non-Newtonian flows; biofluid mechanics; rheology.
Alisa Clyne, PhD (Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Cardiovascular biomechanics.
Bakhtier Farouk, PhD (University of Delaware) Billings Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Heat transfer; combustion; numerical methods; turbulence modeling; materials processing.
Alexander Fridman, DSc, PhD (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, John A. Nyheim Endowed University Chair Professor, Director of the Drexel Plasma Institute. Professor. Plasma science and technology; pollutant mitigation; super-adiabatic combustion; nanotechnology and manufacturing.
Ani Hsieh, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Assistant Professor. Multi-robot systems, decentralized and distributed control, bio-inspired control, swarm robotics.
Andrei Jablokow, PhD (University of Wisconsin; Madison). Associate Teaching Professor. Computational kinematics; geometric modeling.
Suhada Jayasuriya, PhD (Wayne State University) Department Head, Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Distinguished Professor. Multi-agent systems; machine diagnostics in turbomachinery; human-machine interaction; structural health monitoring; alternative energy systems; gait studies in biomechanics.
Antonios Kontsos, PhD (Rice University). Assistant Professor. Applied mechanics; probabilistic engineering mechanics; modeling of smart multifunctional materials.
Emin Caglan Kumbur, PhD (Pennsylvania State University). Assistant Professor. Next generation energy technologies; fuel cell design and development.
Harry G. Kwatny, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) S. Herbert Raynes Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Dynamic systems analysis; stochastic optimal control; control of electric power plants and systems.
John Lacontora, PhD (New Jersey Institute of Technology). Associate Research Professor. Service engineering; industrial engineering.
Leslie Lamberson, PhD (California Institute of Technology). Assistant Professor. Dynamic behavior of materials, dynamic fracture, damage micromechanics, active materials.
Alan Lau, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Associate Department Head for Graduate Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Professor. Deformation and fracture of nano-devices and macroscopic structures; damage-tolerant structures and microstructures.
Matthew McCarthy, PhD (Columbia University). Assistant Professor. Micro- and nanoscale thermofluidic systems, bio-inspired cooling, smart materials and structures for self-regulated two-phase cooling, novel architectures for integrated energy conversion and storage.
David L. Miller, PhD (Louisiana State University). Professor. Gas-phase reaction kinetics; thermodynamics; biofuels.
Alexander Moseson, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Sustainability; engineering design; humanitarian (appropriate) technology; international development; service learning
Hongseok Noh, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. MEMS; BioMEMS; lab-on-a-chip; microfabrication; microfluidics.
Paul Y. Oh, PhD (Columbia University) Associate Department Head for External Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Professor. Smart sensors servomechanisms; machine vision and embedded microcomputers for robotics and mechatronics.
Sorin Siegler, PhD (Drexel University). Professor. Orthopedic biomechanics; robotics; dynamics and control of human motion; applied mechanics.
Wei Sun, PhD (Drexel University) Albert Soffa Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor. Computer-aided tissue engineering; solid freeform fabrication; CAD/CAM; design and modeling of nanodevices.
Ying Sun, PhD (University of Iowa). Associate Professor. Transport processes in multi-component systems with fluid flow; heat and mass transfer; phase change; pattern formation.
Tein-Min Tan, PhD (Purdue University) Associate Department Head for Undergraduate Affairs, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Associate Professor. Mechanics of composites; computational mechanics and finite-elements methods; structural dynamics.
James Tangorra, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Associate Department Head for Finance and Administration, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics. Associate Professor. Analysis of human and (other) animal physiological systems; head-neck dynamics and control; balance, vision, and the vestibular system; animal swimming and flight; robotics; system identification; bio-inspired design.
Christopher Weinberger, PhD (Stanford University). Assistant Professor. Multiscale materials modeling of mechanical properties including DFT, atomistics, mesoscale and microscale FEM modeling.
Ajmal Yousuff, PhD (Purdue University). Associate Professor. Optimal control; flexible structures; model and control simplifications.
Jack G. Zhou, PhD (New Jersey Institute of Technology). Professor. CAD/CAM; computer integrated manufacturing systems; rapid prototyping; system dynamics and automatic control.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Richard Chiou, PhD (Georgia Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Green manufacturing, mechatronics, Internet-based robotics and automation, and remote sensors and monitoring.
Michael Glaser, MFA (Ohio State University) Program Director for Product Design. Assistant Professor. Quantifying the designer's intuition; the interplay between digital and physical forms; human desire to shape our surroundings.
Yury Gogotsi, PhD (Kiev Polytechnic Institute) Director, A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute. Distinguished University & Trustee Chair Professor. Nanomaterials; carbon nanotubes; nanodiamond; graphene; MXene; materials for energy storage, supercapacitors, and batteries.
Y. Grace Hsuan, PhD (Imperial College). Professor. Polymeric and cementitioius materials; geosynthetic reliability and durability.
Michele Marcolongo, PhD, PE (University of Pennsylvania) Senior Associate Vice Provost for Translational Research. Professor. Orthopedic biomaterials; acellular regenerative medicine, biomimetic proteoglycans; hydrogels.
Michel Miller, PhD (University of Miami, Florida). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Special education.
Mira S. Olson, PhD (University of Virginia). Associate Professor. Groundwater; environmental fluid mechanics; hydrology.
William C. Regli, PhD (University of Maryland-College Park). Professor. Artificial intelligence; computer graphics; engineering design and Internet computing.
Jonathan E. Spanier, PhD (Columbia University). Associate Professor. Electronic, ferroic and plasmonic nanostructures and thin-film materials and interfaces; scanning probe microscopy; laser spectroscopy, including Raman scattering.

Emeritus Faculty

Leon Y. Bahar, PhD (Lehigh University). Professor Emeritus. Analytical methods in engineering, coupled thermoelasticity, interaction between analytical dynamics and control systems.
Pei C. Chou, ScD (Aeronautical Engineering from New York University) Billings Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering. Professor Emeritus. Material response due to impulsive loading, wave propagation in isotropic and composite materials, manufacturing technology.
Gordon D. Moskowitz, PhD (Princeton University). Professor Emeritus. Biomechanics, dynamics, design, applied mathematics.
Donald H. Thomas, PhD (Case Institute of Technology). Professor Emeritus. Biocontrol theory, biomechanics, fluidics and fluid control, vehicle dynamics, engineering design.
Albert S. Wang, PhD (University of Delaware) Albert and Harriet Soffa Professor. Professor Emeritus. Treatment of damage evolution processes in multi-phased high-temperature materials, including ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites.
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