Master of Science in Learning Technologies

About the Program

Master of Science Options

  • MS degree with Instructional Technology Specialist, Game based Learning, Instructional Design, or E-Learning Leadership concentration: 45.0 quarter credits
  • MS degree with Instructional Technology Specialist PA Certification (with previous teacher certification): 45.0 quarter credits
  • MS degree with Instructional Technology Specialist PA Certification (without previous teaching certification): 49.5 quarter credits

Scope of the Program


The School of Education offers an MS in Learning Technologies program to prepare graduate students to meet the challenges schools, educational and corporate organizations face related to technology learning needs.

Students can select an instructional technologies specialist concentration, a certificate concentration that prepares for the PA Certification in Instructional Technologies Specialist, or the following concentrations:

The MS in Science and Learning Technologies program provides multiple field experiences, extensive skill development in coaching and mentoring, and a yearlong internship for hand-on experiences in various settings. Each student will develop a unique plan of study in cooperation with a School of Education academic advisor. Students are expected to maintain a continuous registration and will be encouraged to take two courses per term until completion of their program of study.

Courses are offered in an online format. The program also features occasional on-campus events and an annual conference for presentation of program participant research papers and projects, as well as invited keynote speakers, workshops and poster sessions.

Additional Information

For additional information about this program, contact the Program Manager:

Samantha Mercanti-Anthony
Program Manager
School of Education
sm853@drexel.edu
215.895.6894

Admission Requirements

Each candidate to the MS in Science and Learning Technologies will submit the following application materials:

  • Completed application form
  • Appropriate application fee
  • Transcripts (must be provided for every institution attended)
  • Personal essay, providing commitment to program’s unique features
  • Professional resume

Admission to the MS in Learning Technologies program will follow the University standards for admission to graduate study including the receipt of a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with an earned GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Undergraduates who meet the rigorous requirements for participation in an MS program also may be considered. Ideally, a successful candidate will possess a public school teaching certificate or, in the case of an undergraduate pursuing the BS /MS track, complete teacher certification requirement in conjunction with the MS degree. For additional information, contact the School of Education.

Information about how to apply is available on the Graduate Admissions at Drexel University website.

Degree Requirements

Depending on their goals and interests, students completing the MS in Learning Technologies choose either the Instructional Technology Specialist concentration, the Instructional Technology Specialist PA Certification option, or the Learning in Game-Based Environments concentration.


Required Courses
Core Courses
EDAM 528Research Methodology for Action Research3.0
EDLT 536Learning Sciences and Instructional Design3.0
EDLT 537Technologies for Performance Support3.0
EDLT 538New Media Literacies3.0
Internship/Co-op (2 terms)
EDLT 539EDLT Co-op Seminar Course I1.5
EDLT 540EDLT Co-op Seminar Course II4.5
Professional Electives
Electives are selected with the approval of an advisor from within the School of Education or from other Drexel programs. *1.5-9.0
Total Credits19.5-27.0

*

Electives are selected with the approval of an advisor from within the School of Education or from other Drexel programs. The total number of credits for graduation for the MS in Learning Technologies is a minimum of 45.0.

  • 1.5 credits of professional electives for students pursing the Instructional Technology Certification option without prior teaching certification
  • 6.0 credits of professional electives for students pursing the Instructional Technology Certification option with prior teaching certification
  • 9.0 credits of professional electives for students pursuing ITS, ELL, LGBE concentrations.

 

Instructional Technology Concentration

18.0 quarter credits

The Instructional Technology Specialist Concentration program is designed for students interested in specializing in the area of instructional technology while not choosing to continue to pursue the formal certification.

Core Courses
EDUC 511Computer Skills for Teachers3.0
or INFO 688 Instructional Role for the Information Specialist
EDUC 532Designing Virtual Communities for Staff Development - Non-Field Experience3.0
EDUC 534Developing Educational Leaders Using Technology3.0
EDUC 535Researching & Evaluating Instructional Technology3.0
INFO 520Social Context of Information Professions3.0
INFO 640Managing Information Organizations3.0
Total Credits18.0

 

Instructional Technology Specialist Certificate Concentration

25.5 Credits

The Instructional Technology Specialist Certificate Concentration was designed to address the dramatically increasing need in public education for certified Instructional Technology Specialists at every level of K-12 schooling.

Students pursuing the Instructional Technology Specialist PA Certification require a "B" or better in all certification coursework. Applicants for Instructional Technology Specialist Certification should ideally possess valid Pennsylvania Instructional I or II Teaching Certification. (Visit the School of Education for additional information.) If a student seeks the Instructional Technology Specialist PA Certification without a previous held teaching certificate, he or she will need to complete EDUC 522 and EDUC 525.

Core Courses
EDUC 533Designing Virtual Communities3.0
EDUC 534Developing Educational Leaders Using Technology3.0
EDUC 535Researching & Evaluating Instructional Technology3.0
INFO 520Social Context of Information Professions3.0
EDEX 542Fundamentals of Special Education3.0
EDEX 544The Inclusive Classroom3.0
EDEX 552Integrating Technology for Learning & Achievement4.5
INFO 640Managing Information Organizations3.0
EDUC 565Foundations in Instructing English Language Learners3.0
For students without prior teaching certification
Two additional courses are required for candidates without prior teacher certification to complete the Instructional Technology Specialist Certificate. (6 credits)
Evaluation of Instruction
Multi-Media Instructional Design
Total Credits28.5

E-Learning Leadership Concentration

18.0 Credits

The E-Learning Leadership concentration provides an in-depth understanding of online and distance learning theories.

ELL 501The Purpose and Business of E-Learning3.0
ELL 502E-Learning Technologies3.0
ELL 503Teaching and Learning Issues in E-Learning3.0
ELL 504Learning Technologies & Disabilities3.0
ELL 604Design & Delivery of E-Learning I3.0
ELL 605Design & Delivery of E-Learning II3.0
Total Credits18.0

 

Learning in Game-Based Environments Concentration

18.0 quarter credits

The Learning in Game-based Environments Concentration prepares graduates to effectively use educational games in and out of the classroom and training center, provides an overview of game development processes, enables participants to build basic games, and most importantly, examines how to assess and evaluate the learning experience as it relates to educational games.

EDLT 541Foundations of Game-Based Learning3.0
EDLT 542Research in Motivation & Game-based Learning3.0
EDLT 543Play & Learning in a Participatory Culture3.0
EDLT 544Integrating Games & Pedagogical Content Knowledge3.0
EDLT 545Design & Development of Learning Games I3.0
EDUC 535Researching & Evaluating Instructional Technology3.0
Total Credits18.0

 Instructional Design Concentration

18.0 quarter credits

This concentration is designed to prepare teachers, instructors, practitioners and others to use instructional design for K-20 education, adult education, and workplace training that addresses the needs of thee millennial learner and collaborative networked communities.

Required Courses
EDLT 550Introduction to Instructional Design3.0
EDLT 554Learning with Social Media and Mobiles3.0
EDUC 811Designing and Developing Multimedia Applications For Learning3.0
ELL 502E-Learning Technologies3.0
Select two electives from the following:6.0
Multi-Media Instructional Design
Designing Virtual Communities
Foundations of Game-Based Learning
Play & Learning in a Participatory Culture
Total Credits18.0

Courses

EDLT 536 Learning Sciences and Instructional Design 3.0 Credits

The learning sciences and learning by doing bring about a new instructional design emphasis on how the learning technologies provide scaffolding for collaborative learning and reasoning. Students will learn innovative learning techniques and develop an experiential learning design such as, problem-based learning, goal-based scenarios, role-plays, mini-games and simulations.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is EDLT.

EDLT 537 Technologies for Performance Support 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on online performance support systems, job aids, and assessment tools for e-portfolios, authentic assessments, and data collection to meet performance requirements in education and business. Students will have experience in designing embedded interventions for information help, procedural support, feedback and tracking goals, and develop their own e-portfolio.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is EDLT.

EDLT 538 New Media Literacies 3.0 Credits

Students will learn how new media are changing the dimensions of school literacies and challenge traditional ways of learning and communicating. Students will use action research to study current literacies, collaboratively explore and analyze a range of media texts, and design meaningful media-related literacy learning experiences across the curriculum.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is EDLT.

EDLT 539 EDLT Co-op Seminar Course I 1.5 Credit

The first of a two course sequence in which the student proposes and arranges for a party-time co-op experience/project in the field of learning technologies. In the weekly seminar, students share journal entries, do assigned readings and participate in discussions.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is EDLT.
Prerequisites: EDLT 536 [Min Grade: C] and EDLT 537 [Min Grade: C] and EDLT 538 [Min Grade: C]
Corequisite: EDAM 538

EDLT 540 EDLT Co-op Seminar Course II 4.5 Credits

Students implement co-op/capstone project proposed in EDLT 539 to apply knowledge, skills, principles and experiences from the learning technologies coursework and field experiences through action research. Students gain practical skills through culminating, comprehensive ePortfolio based on explicit criteria including samples of work in the co-op experience/project and formally present it and the experience to a panel of professionals.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is EDLT.
Prerequisites: EDLT 539 [Min Grade: C]

EDLT 541 Foundations of Game-Based Learning 3.0 Credits

Students explore the rationale of game studies, the history of games and learning, the role of digital media, and the social nature of games as an affinity space for social learning. Students demonstrate their understanding of why games are powerful environments for learning, identity formation, and motivation.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

EDLT 542 Research in Motivation & Game-based Learning 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to research in game-based learning and the role of motivational theories associated with games and player styles. Students conduct research on existing games to identify the motivational and learning factors. The course provides a foundation for incorporating the role of motivation for engaging learning.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

EDLT 543 Play & Learning in a Participatory Culture 3.0 Credits

Students examine games, emerging media, and learning in the context of participatory culture. Students focus on play, its role in learning in social spaces, and the current research around these practices. Students study the issues relating to how schools, organizations, and society are responding to the challenges of emerging technologies.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

EDLT 544 Integrating Games & Pedagogical Content Knowledge 3.0 Credits

Students use the technological, pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) educational technology framework. Students explore game design systematically by framing game genres as forms of pedagogy as they consider educational content. Students demonstrate their understanding of the interplay of technology, pedagogy, and content in the game environment.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

EDLT 545 Design & Development of Learning Games I 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to the design process of creating learning games. Students will engage in the game design research process of understanding how to apply content and pedagogical elements to a game storyline along with understanding other key elements such as mechanics, technology, and aesthetics.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: EDLT 544 [Min Grade: C]

EDLT 546 Design & Development of Learning Games II 3.0 Credits

This course engages students in the design of a framework for their capstone project using techniques learned in EDLT 545: Design/Dev Learning Games I. Students work in teams to develop a detailed learning games framework.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: EDLT 545 [Min Grade: C]

EDLT 547 Capstone Project I 1.5 Credit

This capstone course is the first part of an independent study where students engage in designing a framework and conducting research. Each student researches a game concept and develops a design framework. Research includes user research and technological, pedagogical and content theories to create the foundation for their learning game.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: EDLT 546 [Min Grade: C]

EDLT 548 Capstone Project II 4.5 Credits

This capstone course is the 2nd part of an independent study where students engage in a design and development project based on their design framework. Students submit documents, conduct play testing, report on the testing results, write a descriptive analysis of their worked example, and present their game prototypes.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: EDLT 547 [Min Grade: C]

EDLT 550 Introduction to Instructional Design 3.0 Credits

Students examine the research and theory of instructional design models and formats in educational, corporate, and workplace settings. Students identify the interrelationships of context, technology and media resources, learner needs and goals, and learning and assessment strategies through case study analysis. Students design an action plan for a learning need.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

EDLT 554 Learning with Social Media and Mobiles 3.0 Credits

Students learn to use social media tools based on a more relevant pedagogy of 21st century learning and change. Students examine the culture of connectivity and networking, use mobile learning strategies and role play, and design an action plan that incorporates social media for learning outcomes.

College/Department: School of Education
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

Education Faculty

W. Edward Bureau, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of the Sacramento EdD. Clinical Associate Professor. Leadership, supervision, and capacity development.
Holly Carpenter, PhD (Arizona State University). Assistant Clinical Professor. Higher education policy development and implementation, community college/university articulation, and online education.
José Luis Chávez, EdD (University of Southern California.) Program Coordinator for the MS in Higher Education Program at the Center for Graduate Studies in Sacramento. Clinical Professor. Higher education leadership and administration.
Ellen Clay, PhD (University of Southwestern Louisiana). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Professional development opportunities for teachers in the area of mathematics and mathematical thinking.
Rebecca Clothey, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) Director, Higher Education Program. Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Comparative and international education, education of ethnic and linguistic minorities, sociology of education.
Marion Dugan, EdD (University of Pennsylvania). Auxiliary Associate Professor. Language arts, student teaching.
Stephen C. Ehrmann Associate Clinical Professor. Learning technologies, learning science, assessment, evaluation, and professional development strategies, used to help educators make visible improvements in programmatic learning outcomes.
Salvatore V. Falletta, EdD (North Carolina State University) Director of the Human Resource Development (HRD) program at Drexel University.. Associate Clinical Professor. Human Resource intelligence (i.e., HR research and analytics practices); HRD assessment, measurement, and evaluation models and taxonomies; organizational diagnostic models; web-based employee and organizational survey methods, and computational modeling.
Aroutis N. Foster, PhD (Michigan State University). Assistant Professor. Educational psychology and educational technology, especially the following: Motivation; Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK); Immersive Interactive Digital Environments (simulation, games, virtual realities.
Kathy Geller, PhD (Fielding Graduate University). Assistant Clinical Professor. Educational leadership and management.
Rajashi Ghosh, PhD (University of Louisville, Kentucky). Assistant Professor. Mentoring and leader development, workplace Incivility, workplace learning and development.
John M. Gould, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) Harrisburg EdD Educational Leadership & Change Program. Associate Clinical Professor. Change leadership, curriculum re-design, the impact of technology on learning.
Mary Jo Grdina, PhD (Case Western Reserve University). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Undergraduate studies, science education, curriculum design.
Dominic F. Gullo, PhD (Indiana University). Professor. Studying the relative and long-range effects of early schooling experiences in prekindergarten and kindergarten on children's achievement and social adaptation to school routine.
Elizabeth Haslam, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Auxiliary Associate Professor. Educational field coordinator, instructional design, qualitative evaluation, writing across the curriculum.
Jennifer Katz-Buonincontro, MFA, PhD (University of Oregon). Assistant Professor. Educational administration.
Kristine Lewis, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Professor. Experiences of students of African descent at predominantly white colleges and universities, college access and college student development, youth civic engagement in urban school reform, qualitative research and evaluation.
William Lynch, PhD (University of Maryland) Dean, Goodwin College of Professional Studies. Professor. Curriculum and educational leadership, educational technology, distance learning policy development, higher and adult education.
Sonya Martin, PhD (Curtin University, Science and Mathematics Education Centre, Perth, Australia). Assistant Professor.
Michel Miller, PhD (University of Miami, Florida). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Special education.
Fredricka K. Reisman, PhD (Syracuse University) Director of the Torrance Center for Creativity and Innovation. Professor. Mathematics education, learning mathematics, mathematics pedagogy, teacher education, heuristic diagnostic learning and teaching, theory and research in creativity and applied creativity.
Sarah P. Reynolds, EdD (Saint Joseph’s University) Program Director. Associate Clinical Professor. Emphasis in cross-cultural, language and academic development.
Ellen B. Scales, PhD (Pennsylvania State University). Auxiliary Assistant Professor. Literacy, mathematics education, special education.
Jason Silverman, PhD (Vanderbilt University.) Director of the Program in Mathematical Learning and Teaching. Assistant Professor. Teaching and learning of advanced mathematical ideas (algebra and calculus); improving teachers' ability to orchestrate and sustain inquiry-based and discussion-based instruction; technology in mathematics education.
David A. Urias, PhD (University of Virginia). Assistant Professor. International education, educational assessment, the influence of corporate philanthropy on higher education.
Sheila Vaidya, PhD (Temple University) Associate Director of Research and Outreach Programs. Associate Professor. Educational psychology, school psychology, research design.
Charles A. Williams, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Prevention of school-aged violence.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Barbara Jean Hoekje, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of English Language Center. Associate Professor. Sociolinguistic theory, discourse analysis, applied linguistics (language teaching, learning, and testing).
Patricia Henry Russell, MS (Drexel University). Teaching Professor. Probability and statistics.

Emeritus Faculty

Francis Harvey, EdD (Harvard University). Professor Emeritus. Enhanced learning, socio-cultural learning, distance education.
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