Mathematics

Bachelor of Arts Degree: 180.0 quarter credits
Bachelor of Science Degree: 180.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The mathematics major at Drexel provides a supportive learning environment in which students obtain a firm grounding in the core areas of mathematics and apply this knowledge to problems encountered in a technological society. The Department of Mathematics offers students the option of either a BA or a BS degree.

The Mathematics Department takes pride in offering a balanced and flexible curriculum. Three very different kinds of skills are emphasized in the mathematics major:

  • Abstract Reasoning

    All students majoring in mathematics take courses that emphasize abstract reasoning. Students read and write proofs, and graduate well prepared to enter a PhD program in mathematics.
     
  • Computing

    All students majoring in mathematics take a series of computing courses. This emphasis on computing is one of the distinctive features of the mathematics program at Drexel, and provides students with a competitive advantage in the job market.
     
  • Mathematical Modeling

    All students majoring in mathematics take multidisciplinary courses that focus on the interplay between mathematics and an area of application.

    Students often use electives to focus on an area of personal interest. The Department of Mathematics encourages students to minor in a subject where mathematics is applied. The Department provides an advisor to assist students in selecting electives and planning career paths.

Degree Requirements (BA)

General Education Requirements
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
One of the following Computer Science sequences:9.0
Option I
Introduction to Multimedia Programming
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Computer Programming I
Option II
Introduction to Multimedia Programming
Computer Programming I
Computer Programming II
Humanities and fine arts electives6.0
International studies electives6.0
Science electives6.0
Social and behavioral sciences electives6.0
Studies in diversity electives6.0
Free Electives (depending upon other options selected)67.0
Core Mathematics Requirements
MATH 121Calculus I *4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
MATH 220Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I3.0-4.0
or MATH 401 Elements of Modern Analysis I
Additional Mathematics Requirements
Track Courses9.0-11.0
Select one of the following sequences:
Discrete Mathematics
   and Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software
   and Abstract Algebra II
Vector Calculus
   and Complex Variables
   and Elements of Modern Analysis II
Numerical Analysis I
   and Numerical Analysis II
   and Introduction to Optimization Theory
Probability and Statistics I
   and Probability and Statistics II
   and Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software
Survey of Geometry
   and Probability and Statistics I
   and Probability and Statistics II
Four Mathematics Courses **12.0
Three Mathematics Related Courses ***9.0
Total Credits181.0-184.0


*

 Math majors must pass MATH 121 with a grade of B or higher.

**

 Students either select these courses from the list of MATH courses in for the BS in Mathematics or from additional mathematics electives, provided that approval is obtained in advance from the undergraduate mathematics advisor. The following courses cannot be counted toward the BA in Mathematics: MATH 004, MATH 100, MATH 101, MATH 102, MATH 110, MATH 119, MATH 180, MATH 181, MATH 182, MATH 183, and MATH 239. In addition, MATH 291 doesn't count towards the math electives if MATH 321 and MATH 322
are taken.

***

 Students must complete three additional courses in fields related to mathematics such as science, engineering, economics, finance, decision sciences, and computer science. A list of approved courses will be maintained by the undergraduate mathematics advisor. These three courses are in addition to the two science courses required as part of the General Education requirements, as well as the  required CS sequence.

 Categories of Electives

  • Humanities and arts electives
    Designated courses in art, art history, communication studies, foreign languages (300-level or above), history, literature, music, philosophy, religion, and theatre arts.
     
  • International electives
    Designated courses in anthropology, art history, history, literature, music, politics and sociology. Courses with an international focus may be used to fulfill requirements in other categories as well.
     
  • Science electives
    Students select two courses from chemistry, biology or physics. both courses may be in the same subject or they may be in different subject areas.
     
  • Social and behavioral sciences electives
    Designated courses in anthropology, economics, criminal justice, international relations, history, politics, psychology and sociology.
     
  • Studies in diversity electives
    Designated courses in Africana studies, anthropology, communication, English, history, Judaic studies, linguistics, music, sociology and women's studies.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study (BA) 

5-year co-op sequence


Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Science elective 3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Science elective3.0-4.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 220Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Social science elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 4
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
Diversity studies elective 3.0
International studies elective 3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 5
Mathematics (MATH) course*3.0
Course in math-related field**3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective 3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
Mathematics (MATH) course*3.0
Social science elective 3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
Mathematics (MATH) sequence option*3.0
Diversity studies elective3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
MATH 401
or 331
Elements of Modern Analysis I
Abstract Algebra I
3.0
Course in a math-related field**3.0
International studies elective 3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
Mathematics sequence option*3.0
Course in a math-related field**3.0
Free electives 10.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 10
Mathematics (MATH) course*4.0
Free electives 12.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 11
Mathematics sequence option*3.0
Free electives 10.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 12
Mathematics (MATH) course*3.0
Free electives 10.0
 Term Credits13.0
Total Credit: 181.0-183.0

 

*

See degree requirements

Students  select these courses from the list of Mathematics (MATH) requirements/electives listed in the degree requirements, or can suggest additional mathematics electives, provided that approval is obtained in advance from the undergraduate mathematics advisor. The following courses cannot be counted toward the BA in Mathematics: MATH 004, MATH 100, MATH 101, MATH 102, MATH 110, MATH 119, MATH 180, MATH 181, MATH 182, MATH 183, and MATH 239.

**

Students must complete three courses in fields related to mathematics such as science, engineering, economics, finance, decision sciences, and computer science. A list of approved courses will be maintained by the undergraduate mathematics advisor. These three courses are in addition to the two science courses required as part of the General Education requirements, as well as the Computer Science (CS) required sequence.




 

Degree Requirements (BS) 

General Education Requirements
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
One of the following Computer Science sequences:9.0
Option I
Introduction to Multimedia Programming
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Computer Programming I
Option II
Introduction to Multimedia Programming
Computer Programming I
Computer Programming II
Any Biology (BIO) course3.0-4.0
Any Chemistry (CHEM) course3.0-4.0
Any Physics (PHYS) course3.0-4.0
Humanities electives9.0
Social sciences electives18.0
Free electives41.0
Mathematics Requirements
MATH 121Calculus I *4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
MATH 220Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I4.0
MATH 332Abstract Algebra II3.0
MATH 401Elements of Modern Analysis I3.0
MATH 402Elements of Modern Analysis II3.0
Math Major Electives40.0
Select a minimum of 40 credits (10-14 classes) from the following:
Survey of Geometry
Discrete Mathematics
Math Competition Problem Solving Seminar
History of Mathematics
Differential Equations II
Complex and Vector Analysis for Engineers
Numerical Analysis I
Numerical Analysis II
Introduction to Optimization Theory
Probability and Statistics I
Probability and Statistics II
Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software
Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software
Techniques of Data Analysis
Actuarial Mathematics
Vector Calculus
Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations
Linear Algebra II
Introduction to Topology
Mathematical Finance
Cryptography
Total Credits181.0-184.0

*

Math majors must pass MATH 121 with a grade of B or higher.



Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.


Sample Plan of Study (BS)

This a recommended plan, illustrating the five-year co-op sequence. Additional recommended plans of study for other co-op options are available from the department.

First Year
Term 1Credits
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
Computer Science (CS) course sequence*3.0
Any Biology (BIO) course3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: The Craft of Persuasion3.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Any Chemistry (CHEM) course3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Thematic Analysis Across Genres3.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Any Physics (PHYS) course3.0-4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Second Year
Term 4
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 220Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
Social Science Electives6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
Social Science Elective3.0
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**3.0
Humanites Elective3.0
 Term Credits13.0
Third Year
Term 6
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I4.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**4.0
Social Science Elective3.0
Humanities elective3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 7
MATH 332Abstract Algebra II3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**4.0
Humanities elective3.0
Social science elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Fourth Year
Term 8
MATH 401Elements of Modern Analysis I3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**3.0
Social science elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
MATH 402Elements of Modern Analysis II3.0
Mathematics (MATH) electives**7.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits17.0
Fifth Year
Term 10
Mathematics (MATH) electives**8.0
Free electives7.0-8.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 11
Mathematics (MATH) electives**7.0
Free electives 8.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
Mathematics (MATH) electives**6.0
Free electives9.0-10.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Total Credit: 181.0-184.0

 

*

 See degree requirements.

**

Select from MATH 205, MATH 221, MATH 235, MATH 238, MATH 285, MATH 291, MATH 300, MATH 301, MATH 305, MATH 311, MATH 312, MATH 316, MATH 318 [WI] , MATH 319, MATH 320, MATH 321, MATH 322, MATH 323, MATH 387, MATH 422, MATH 449,MATH 475.



Co-op/Career Opportunities

Mathematicians are employed in a variety of capacities in business, industry, and government. Students can combine courses in economics or finance and mathematics to prepare for careers in the actuarial field, banks, stock exchanges, or finance departments of large corporations or other financial institutions. Students interested in science careers may focus on probability and statistics in order to work for industries like pharmaceutical manufacturers. Many others combine math studies with computer science courses to prepare for careers in information systems or engineering.

Teacher certification is also a career option available through a joint program in mathematics and teacher education.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Dual Degree Bachelor’s Programs

Since applied mathematics plays an important role in many different disciplines, mathematics majors often choose to pursue specialization in a second field of study. Students may choose a dual major that involves completing the requirements of two separate majors or they can opt for a minor, which involves completing the major in one field and a smaller set of courses in another.

Dual majors are common in mathematics/computer science and mathematics/physics. Students interested in a dual major should consult with their advisor or contact the assistant department head. Dual majors in other fields are also possible, but early planning and discussions with advisors is essential.

Minor in Mathematics 

The minor in mathematics consists of five required courses and elective courses from the specified group of courses listed below resulting in a minimum of 38.0 credits.

Required Courses
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra *3.0-4.0
or MATH 261 Linear Algebra
Total credits19.0-20.0
Mathematics Minor Electives **
Select from the following:18.0-19.0
Survey of Geometry
Differential Equations *
Differential Equations
Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning
Discrete Mathematics
Math Competition Problem Solving Seminar
Differential Equations II
Applied Differential Equations
Complex and Vector Analysis for Engineers ***
Numerical Analysis I
Numerical Analysis II
Introduction to Optimization Theory
Probability and Statistics I
Probability and Statistics II
Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software
Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software
Actuarial Mathematics
Vector Calculus
Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations
Abstract Algebra I
Abstract Algebra II
Elements of Modern Analysis I
Elements of Modern Analysis II
Scientific Data Analysis I
Scientific Data Analysis II
Introduction to Topology
Mathematical Finance
Introduction to Graph Theory
Cryptography
Total credits38.0

*

Students count only one of these two courses for their minor.

**

A request form is available for any other mathematics courses upon the written approval prior to the beginning of the quarter in which the course is to be offered. Students should contact the Mathematics undergraduate academic advisor at advisor@math.drexel.edu.

***

Students who take MATH 291 cannot also count MATH 321 or MATH 322 toward their minor.


Courses

MATH 004 Trigonometry 0.0 Credits

Required for all students who did not have high school trigonometry and for those who did not pass the placement test in trigonometry. Covers the rectangular coordinate system and distance formula, angular measure and trigonometric functions of a number, variations and graphs of the trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, inverse trigonometric functions, and solutions of triangles applications. All terms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MATH 050 Elements of Precalculus 0.0 Credits

This course covers topics essential for the study of calculus, including elements of algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MATH 100 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3.0 Credits

Course covers properties of real numbers, algebraic expressions, rational expressions, linear and quadratic functions and graphs. This course is intended to give students the background needed to enroll in MATH 101.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore .
Corequisite: EXAM 082

MATH 101 Introduction to Analysis I 4.0 Credits

Covers linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations; elementary linear programming; matrix algebra; inverse; and mathematics of finance.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: APEM 061 or MATH 100 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 102 Introduction to Analysis II 4.0 Credits

Covers limits, continuity, derivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, and applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 101 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 107 Probability and Statistics for Liberal Arts 3.0 Credits

Probability and statistics in everyday life. The pitfalls of interpreting statistical data. A basic introduction to probability, chance, and gambling. Examples include coin-tossing, dice and roulette wheels.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 100 [Min Grade: D] or APEM 060

MATH 108 Mathematics for Nursing Professionals 3.0 Credits

Math foundations needed in the calculation of dosages and solutions of medications. Topics include systems of measurement and calculating dosages involving tablets, capsules, liquids, and powders.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: APEN 070 or MATH 100 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 110 Precalculus 3.0 Credits

Reviews topics from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry essential for the study of calculus. For students planning to take Calculus I.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore .
Corequisite: EXAM 082

MATH 119 Mathematical Foundations for Design 4.0 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to the mathematical concepts and tools most useful to students majoring in the Design Arts. Topics include functions, graphs, plane and fractal geometry, trigonometry, polar coordinates, and elementary topology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore .
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 121 Calculus I 4.0 Credits

Functions, limits and continuity, derivatives, trancendental functions, and applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore .
Prerequisites: APC 070 or APC2 070 or MATH 110 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 122 Calculus II 4.0 Credits

Definite integrals, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, integration techniques, applications of integration, numerical integration and differential equations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 121 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 123 Calculus III 4.0 Credits

Differential equations, Taylor's theorem, sequence and series, convergence, power series.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 122 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 180 Discrete Computational Structures 4.0 Credits

Covers basic concepts of discrete mathematics that are important to computing, including elementary set theory, recurrence relations, and graph theory.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 102 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 121 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 181 Mathematical Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers set theory, coordinate systems and graphs, functions, linear programming (geometric approach), matrices and linear systems, and linear programming (algebraic approach). Required for architecture, business administration, and construction management students. Non-credit for engineering and science students. Fall, Winter.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MATH 182 Mathematical Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers counting techniques, probability, statistics, and probability applications. Non-credit for engineering and science students. All terms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 181 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 183 Mathematical Analysis III 3.0 Credits

Covers limits, rates of change, derivatives, applications of differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, integrals, techniques of integration, applications of integration. Non-credit for engineering and science students. All terms.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 182 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 200 Multivariate Calculus 4.0 Credits

Vectors, curves, partial derivatives, gradient, constrained optimization, coordinate system, multiple integrals, and applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 122 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 080

MATH 201 Linear Algebra 4.0 Credits

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, orthogonality, diagonalization, applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 121 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 081

MATH 205 Survey of Geometry 3.0 Credits

Axiomatic approach to geometry: plane geometry, transformational geometrics, and an introduction to classical non-Euclidean geometries. Includes experimental approaches using appropriate software tools.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 201 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 210 Differential Equations 4.0 Credits

Covers solution methods and properties for scalar and vector differential equations. Topics include linear and nonlinear equations, numerical methods, separation of variables, and transform methods.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D] and MATH 201 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 220 [WI] Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning 3.0 Credits

A transition course that develops the reasoning skills necessary for later courses. Emphasizes writing and presentation skills. Topics taken from set theory, logic, induction, relations, functions, and properties of the real number system.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MATH 221 Discrete Mathematics 3.0 Credits

Elementary set theory, combinatorics, elementary number theory, graphs, and special topics chosen from formal language theory, graph algorithms, coding theory, and other applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 220 [Min Grade: D] or CS 270 [Min Grade: D] or ECE 200 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 081

MATH 235 Math Competition Problem Solving Seminar 0.5-4.0 Credits

Problems from math competitions (such as the Putnam exam) are solved by students in this course.This course may be repeated four times for credit as topics vary.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 4 times for NaN credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 238 History of Mathematics 3.0 Credits

This course explores the history of mathematical concepts. Both the people involved and the environment in which the developments took place will be studied. Mathematics from the time of Babylonia to the present will be discussed. The presentation will take a thematic approach, which may vary each term.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

MATH 239 Mathematics for the Life Sciences 4.0 Credits

A broad survey of mathematical topics that are fundamental for application in the life science: multivariate calculus, differential equations, elementary probability. Emphasis on application.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 102 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 122 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 250 Mathematics of Investment and Credit 3.0 Credits

Interest Rate Measurement, Valuation of Annuities, Loan Repayment,Bond Valuation Recommended for students taking actuarial exam FM2.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 123 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 261 Linear Algebra 3.0 Credits

Covers matrix arithmetic systems of linear equations, including vector spaces, coordinate systems, determinants, characteristic value problems, and Euclidean spaces, and application to quadratic forms and linear differential equations. Problems from engineering and science will be solved using applications such as MATLAB during the lab.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if classification is Freshman.
Prerequisites: MATH 122 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 262 Differential Equations 3.0 Credits

Covers solutions of first-order equations, undetermined coefficient and variation of parameter methods of solution of higher order linear equations, systems of equations, and Laplace transform. Problems from engineering and science will be solved using applications such as MATLAB during the lab.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 261 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 279 Special Topics in Mathematics 12.0 Credits

Covers topics in pure or applied mathematics. Different topics may be considered in different quarters.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MATH 285 Differential Equations II 3.0 Credits

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 210 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 286 Applied Differential Equations 3.0 Credits

Reviews basic methods, including applications to electric circuits, chemical mixtures, mechanics, and motion problems. Introduces partial differential equations. Spring. Alternate years.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 285 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 291 Complex and Vector Analysis for Engineers 4.0 Credits

Complex and Vector Analysis for Engineers. Covers gradient, divergence, and curl; integral theorems curvilinear coordinates, complex differentiation and integration, Cauchy's Theorem, power series, residues and applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D] and PHYS 102 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 300 Numerical Analysis I 4.0 Credits

The course covers polynomial and trigonometric interpolation, splines, numerical linear algebra, numerical quadrature, solutions of nonlinear equations, and nonlinear optimization. The course emphasizes computational solutions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D] and MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] and (CS 171 [Min Grade: D] or CS 123 [Min Grade: D])

MATH 301 Numerical Analysis II 3.0 Credits

A continuation of MATH 300. This course focuses on time dependent problems. It includes numerical solution of ordinary differential equation, the heat and wave equations, and moving interfaces. The discussed techniques include implicit schemes or ODEs, finite differences, spectral methods and the level set method.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 300 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 305 Introduction to Optimization Theory 4.0 Credits

Provides a broad survey of mathematical techniques in optimization theory used in operations research and management science. Includes topics selected from the following categories: linear programming, integer programming, network flows, and nonlinear programming.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 201 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 310 Probability and Statistics 4.0 Credits

Not open to mathematics or computer science majors. Covers probability, probability distribution of discrete and continuous random variables, moment-generating functions, distribution of sample statistics, estimation and statistical tests, tests for goodness of fit, and regression analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if major is CS or major is MATH or classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 311 Probability and Statistics I 4.0 Credits

Discrete and continuous probability distributions, conditional probabilities, expected value and variance, joint probability distributions,marginal distributions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 081

MATH 312 Probability and Statistics II 4.0 Credits

Covers estimation, consistency, unbiasedness, maximum likelihood, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, Type I and Type II errors, Neyman Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio tests, and tests for means and variances.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 311 [Min Grade: D]
Corequisite: EXAM 081

MATH 316 Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software 3.0 Credits

Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software. Topics from calculus are investigated via complex problems requiring the use of symbolic mathematical software, primarily Maple. Numerical, graphical, and algebraic approaches are integrated. Limits, derivatives, root-finding, integration, and infinite series are explored in this context.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 123 [Min Grade: D] and MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 318 [WI] Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software 3.0 Credits

Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software. Applications of modern statistical technologies and software, such as SAS, are used to describe and analyze data. Some topics covered are data management, collecting data, inferences for single and multiple population means, proportions count data, regression, correlation and nonparametric statistical methods. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 310 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 312 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 319 Techniques of Data Analysis 4.0 Credits

An applied course that considers the acquisition, analysis, visualization, and presentation of data. Emphasizes computation.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 318 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 320 Actuarial Mathematics 3.0 Credits

Covers probability in a risk management context. Univariate probability distribution including binomial, negative binomial, Poisson, uniform, exponential, normal, lognormal, Pareto, and Weibull distributions. Multivariate distributions including conditional and marginal probability distributions, joint moment generating functions, probability and moments for linear combinations of independent random variables and related topics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 311 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 321 Vector Calculus 4.0 Credits

Covers vector algebra; gradient, divergence, curl, and curvilinear coordinates; Green's theorem, divergence theorem, and Stokes' theorem; and applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 261 [Min Grade: D]) and MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 322 Complex Variables 4.0 Credits

Introduces functions of one complex variable. Topics include the basic properties of analytic functions, power series, integration, residues and poles, and conformal mapping with applications.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 210 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 323 Partial Differential Equations 4.0 Credits

Covers basic concepts and solution techniques for the standard partial differential equations of mathematical physics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 210 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 331 Abstract Algebra I 4.0 Credits

Covers theory of groups, homomorphism and isomorphism, theory of rings, integral domains, ideals, unique factorization, and theory of fields.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (MATH 220 [Min Grade: C-] or CS 270 [Min Grade: C-]) and (MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 261 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 231 [Min Grade: D])

MATH 332 Abstract Algebra II 3.0 Credits

Covers further topics in abstract algebra, including canonical decomposition of linear transformation, bilinear forms, multilinear algebra and determinants, finite fields, and selected short subjects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 331 [Min Grade: C-]

MATH 382 Advanced Calculus 3.0 Credits

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MATH 387 Linear Algebra II 3.0 Credits

Covers linear transformations, including kernel and range; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization of symmetric matrices; and application to differential equations, quadratic forms, and Markov chains. Fall.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: or MATH 201 [Min Grade: D], MATH 261 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 201 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 401 Elements of Modern Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers the real number system, elementary topology, limits, infinite series, continuity, derivatives, and the Riemann integral.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (MATH 220 [Min Grade: C-] or CS 270 [Min Grade: C-]) and (MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 261 [Min Grade: D] or ENGR 231 [Min Grade: D]) and MATH 200 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 402 Elements of Modern Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers continuation of integration theory, improper integrals, sequences and series, power series, and uniform convergence.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 401 [Min Grade: C-]

MATH 410 Scientific Data Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Fundamental principles and applications of statistics for scientific data analysis. Topics include data exploration, principles of probability distributions, Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, z, t and F tests, one-way analysis of variance, linear regression, and contingency table analysis. Programming statistical applications in R will be included.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 122 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 239 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 411 Scientific Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Scientific data analysis and experimental design. Topics include multiple regression and model selection, nonlinear and logistic regression, analysis of covariance, multi-factor analysis of variance, nested, factorial and repeated measures experimental designs, random effects, and introduction to bootstrap methods and randomization tests. Programming statistical applications in R will be included.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 410 [Min Grade: C-]

MATH 422 Introduction to Topology 4.0 Credits

Covers topological space, metric spaces, function, continuity, compactness, and connectedness.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 200 [Min Grade: D] or MATH 201 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 449 Mathematical Finance 3.0 Credits

This course is an introduction to the mathematics of finance. The main topics include: fixed income mathematics (duration, convexity, compounding conventions, immunization of bond portfolios, yield curve stripping), foundations of the arbitrage theory (pricing of futures and forwards, swaps, put/call parity) and introduction to stochastic derivative pricing (Black-Scholes and beyond).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 311 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 450 Introduction to Graph Theory 3.0 Credits

Introduction to Graph Theory. Topics covered include paths and cycles, Eulerian graphs, Hamiltonian graphs, trees, matching, coloring, planarity, and some additional topics in special graphs such as interval graphs.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] and MATH 221 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 475 Cryptography 3.0 Credits

Classic cryptosystems, elementary number theory, RSA, ElGamal, discrete logarithms, digital signatures, plus a special topic selected from elliptic curves, information theory, and quantum cryptography.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: MATH 201 [Min Grade: D] and MATH 311 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 480 Special Topics in Mathematics 12.0 Credits

Covers topics in Mathematics of interest to students or faculty. Different topics may be considered during different quarters.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MATH 483 Discrete Event Simulation 3.0 Credits

Covers system simulation, Monte Carlo methods, discrete event modeling techniques, queuing models, programming considerations, statistical definitions and concepts, random number generation, output analysis, and design of computer experiments. Spring.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 385 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 489 Tensor Analysis 3.0 Credits

Covers tensor algebra, including coordinate transformations, fundamental quadratic form, covariant and contravariant tensors, Riemannian metric, and applications. Elective. Spring. Alternate years.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: MATH 381 [Min Grade: D]

MATH 497 Independent Study in Mathematics 0.5-12.0 Credits

Provides supervised study of selected topics in mathematics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

MATH 498 Special Topics 12.0 Credits

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

MATH 499 Independent Study in Mathematics 6.0 Credits

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Mathematics Faculty

David M. Ambrose, PhD (Duke University) Associate Department Head of the Mathematics Department. Associate Professor. Applied analysis and computing for systems of nonlinear partial differential equations, especially free-surface problems in fluid dynamics.
Jason Aran, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Jonah D. Blasiak, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Professor. Algebraic combinatorics, representation theory, and complexity theory.
Robert P. Boyer, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Associate Department Head of the Mathematics Department. Professor. Functional analysis, C*-algebras and the theory of group representations.
Patrick Clarke, PhD (University of Miami). Assistant Professor. Homological mirror symmetry, Landau-Ginzburg models, algebraic geometry, symplectic geometry.
Alexander Dolgopolsky, PhD (Case Western Reserve University). Associate Teaching Professor. Applied mathematics.
Daryl Falco, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Discrete mathematics and automata theory.
Raymond J. Favocci, III, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Carlo Fazioli, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago). Assistant Teaching Professor. Computational fluid dynamics, free boundary problems.
Pavel Grinfeld, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Intersection of physics, engineering, applied mathematics and computational science.
Anatolii Grinshpan, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Teaching Professor. Function theory and operator theory, harmonic analysis, matrix theory.
Yixin Guo, PhD (University of Pittsburgh). Associate Professor. Biomathematics, dynamical systems, ordinary and partial differential equations and math education.
R. Andrew Hicks, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Geometry and optical design.
Pawel Hitczenko, PhD (Warsaw University). Professor. Probability theory and its applications to analysis, combinatorics, wavelets, and the analysis of algorithms.
Robert Immordino, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Dmitry Kaliuzhnyi-Verbovetskyi, PhD (Kharkov National University). Associate Professor. Operator theory, systems theory, complex analysis, C*-algebras and harmonic analysis.
Hwan Yong Lee, PhD (University of Utah). Assistant Teaching Professor. Electromagnetic wave propagation in composite media, optimization and inverse problem.
Huilan Li, PhD (York University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Algebraic combinatorics.
Georgi S. Medvedev, PhD (Boston University). Associate Professor. Ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical neuroscience.
Jennifer Morse, PhD (University of California, San Diego) Undergraduate Advisor. Professor. Algebraic combinatorics.
Shari Moskow, PhD (Rutgers University) Department Head of the Mathematics Department. Professor. Partial differential equations and numerical analysis, including homogenization theory, numerical methods for problems with rough coefficients, and inverse problems.
Marna A. Mozeff, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Oksana P. Odintsova, PhD (Omsk State University). Associate Teaching Professor. Math education.
Dimitrios Papadopoulos, MS (Drexel University). Instructor.
Ronald K. Perline, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Associate Professor. Applied mathematics, numerical analysis, symbolic computation, differential geometry, mathematical physics.
Marci A. Perlstadt, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Associate Professor. Applied mathematics, computed tomography, numerical analysis of function reconstruction, signal processing, combinatorics.
Adam C. Rickert, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Patricia Henry Russell, MS (Drexel University). Teaching Professor. Probability and statistics.
Eric Schmutz, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Probabilistic combinatorics, asymptotic enumeration.
Li Sheng, PhD (Rutgers University). Associate Professor. Discrete optimization, combinatorics, operations research, graph theory and its application in molecular biology, social sciences and communication networks, biostatistics.
Gideon Simpson, PhD (Columbia University). Assistant Professor. Partial differential equations, scientific computing and applied mathematics.
Judy T. Smith, MA (West Chester University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Justin R. Smith, PhD (Courant Institute, New York University). Professor. Homotopy theory, operad theory, quantum mechanics, quantum computing.
Xiaoming Song, PhD (University of Kansas). Assistant Professor. Stochastic Calculus, Large Deviation Theory, Theoretical Statistics, Data Network Modeling, and Numerical Analysis.
Jeanne M. Steuber, MS (Boston University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Kenneth P. Swartz, PhD (Harvard University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Applied statistics, data analysis, calculus, discrete mathematics, biostatistics.
Vaishalee T. Wadke, MS (Columbia University). Instructor.
Richard D. White, MS (Penn State University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Hugo J. Woerdeman, PhD (Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam). Professor. Matrix and operator theory, systems theory, signal and image processing, and harmonic analysis.
J. Douglas Wright, PhD (Boston University). Associate Professor. Partial differential equations, specifically nonlinear waves and their interactions.
Dennis G. Yang, PhD (Cornell University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Dynamical systems, neurodynamics.
Thomas (Pok-Yin) Yu, PhD (Stanford University). Professor. Multiscale mathematics, wavelets, applied harmonic analysis, subdivision algorithms, nonlinear analysis, applied differential geometry and data analysis.

Emeritus Faculty

Loren N. Argabright, PhD (University of Washington). Professor Emeritus. Functional analysis, wavelets, abstract harmonic analysis, the theory of group representations.
Robert C. Busby, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus. Functional analysis, C*-algebras and group representations, computer science.
Ewaugh Finney Fields, EdD (Temple University) Dean Emeritus. Professor Emeritus. Mathematics education, curriculum and instruction, minority engineering education.
William M.Y. Goh, PhD (Ohio State University). Associate Professor Emeritus. Number theory, approximation theory and special functions, combinatorics, asymptotic analysis.
Bernard Kolman, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus. Lie algebras; theory, applications, and computational techniques; operations research.
Charles J. Mode, PhD (University of California at Davis). Professor Emeritus. Probability and statistics, biostatistics, epidemiology, mathematical demography, data analysis, computer-intensive methods.
Chris Rorres, PhD (Courant Institute, New York University). Professor Emeritus. Applied mathematics, scattering theory, mathematical modeling in biological sciences, solar-collection systems.
Jet Wimp, PhD (University of Edinburgh). Professor Emeritus. Applied mathematics, special factors, approximation theory, numerical techniques, asymptotic analysis.
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