Mathematics

Major: Mathematics
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 181.0
Co-op Options: Three Co-op (Five years); One Co-op (Four years); No Co-op (Four years)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 27.0101
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code:
15-2021

About the Program

The mathematics major at Drexel provides a supportive learning environment in which students obtain a firm grounding in the core areas of mathematics and apply this knowledge to problems encountered in a technological society. The Department of Mathematics offers students the option of either a BA or a BS degree.

The Mathematics Department takes pride in offering a balanced and flexible curriculum. Three very different kinds of skills are emphasized in the mathematics major:

Abstract Reasoning

All students majoring in mathematics take courses that emphasize abstract reasoning. Students read and write proofs, and graduate well prepared to enter a PhD program in mathematics.

Computing

All students majoring in mathematics take a series of computing courses. This emphasis on computing is one of the distinctive features of the mathematics program at Drexel, and provides students with a competitive advantage in the job market.

Mathematical Modeling

All students majoring in mathematics take multidisciplinary courses that focus on the interplay between mathematics and an area of application. Students often use electives to focus on an area of personal interest. The Department of Mathematics encourages students to minor in a subject where mathematics is applied. The Department provides an advisor to assist students in selecting electives and planning career paths.

Degree Requirements (BA)

General Education Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
One of the following Computer Science sequences:9.0
Option I
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Computer Science Principles
Computer Programming I
Option II
Computer Science Principles
Computer Programming I
Computer Programming II
Humanities and fine arts electives6.0
International studies electives6.0
Science electives6.0
Social and behavioral sciences electives6.0
Studies in diversity electives6.0
Free Electives67.0
Core Mathematics Requirements
MATH 121Calculus I *4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
MATH 220 [WI] Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I3.0-4.0
or MATH 401 Elements of Modern Analysis I
Math Major Electives **30.0
Select a minimum of 30 credits from the following:
Survey of Geometry
Discrete Mathematics
Combinatorics
Math Competition Problem Solving Seminar
History of Mathematics
Mathematics of Investment and Credit
Differential Equations II
Numerical Analysis I
Numerical Analysis II
Introduction to Optimization Theory
Probability and Statistics I
Probability and Statistics II
Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software
Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software
Techniques of Data Analysis
Actuarial Mathematics
Vector Calculus
Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations
Abstract Algebra II
Linear Algebra II
Elements of Modern Analysis I
Abstract Algebra I
Elements of Modern Analysis II
Introduction to Topology
Mathematical Finance
Introduction to Graph Theory
Cryptography
Discrete Event Simulation
Tensor Calculus
Total Credits181.0-182.0

 Categories of Electives

  • Humanities and arts electives
    Designated courses in art, art history, communication studies, foreign languages (300-level or above), history, literature, music, philosophy, religion, and theatre arts.
     
  • International electives
    Designated courses in anthropology, art history, history, literature, music, politics and sociology. Courses with an international focus may be used to fulfill requirements in other categories as well.
     
  • Science electives
    Students select two courses from chemistry, biology or physics. Both courses may be in the same subject or they may be in different subject areas.
     
  • Social and behavioral sciences electives
    Designated courses in anthropology, economics, criminology & justice studies, international relations, history, politics, psychology and sociology.
     
  • Studies in diversity electives
    Designated courses in Africana studies, anthropology, communication, English, history, Judaic studies, linguistics, music, sociology and women's & gender studies.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Program. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term.

Degree Requirements (BS) 

General Education Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
One of the following Computer Science sequences:9.0
Option I
Computer Programming Fundamentals
Computer Science Principles
Computer Programming I
Option II
Computer Science Principles
Computer Programming I
Computer Programming II
Any Biology (BIO) course3.0-4.0
Any Chemistry (CHEM) course3.0-4.0
Any Physics (PHYS) course3.0-4.0
Humanities electives6.0
Social sciences electives15.0
International studies or studies in diversity electives6.0
Free electives41.0
Mathematics Requirements
MATH 121Calculus I *4.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
MATH 220 [WI] Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I4.0
MATH 332Abstract Algebra II3.0
MATH 401Elements of Modern Analysis I3.0
MATH 402Elements of Modern Analysis II3.0
Math Major Electives **40.0
Select a minimum of 40 credits from the following:
Combinatorics
Math Competition Problem Solving Seminar
Mathematics of Investment and Credit
Differential Equations II
Numerical Analysis I
Numerical Analysis II
Introduction to Optimization Theory
Probability and Statistics I
Probability and Statistics II
Mathematical Applications of Symbolic Software
Mathematical Applications of Statistical Software
Techniques of Data Analysis
Actuarial Mathematics
Vector Calculus
Complex Variables
Partial Differential Equations
Linear Algebra II
Introduction to Topology
Mathematical Finance
Introduction to Graph Theory
Cryptography
Discrete Event Simulation
Tensor Calculus
Total Credits181.0-184.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Program. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term.


Sample Plan of Study (BA) 

5-year co-op sequence

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 121*Calculus I4.0
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course3.0
Science elective 3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course3.0
Science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 220 [WI] Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course3.0
Social and behavioral science elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 4
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
Diversity studies elective 3.0
International studies elective 3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 5
Mathematics (MATH) courses**6.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective 3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
Mathematics (MATH) course**3.0
Social and behavioral science elective 3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
Mathematics (MATH) course**3.0
Diversity studies elective3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
MATH 401
or 331
Elements of Modern Analysis I
Abstract Algebra I
3.0-4.0
Mathematics (MATH) course**3.0
International studies elective 3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 9
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Mathematics (MATH) courses**4.0
Free electives 10.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
Mathematics (MATH) course**4.0
Free electives 12.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 11
Mathematics (MATH) course**3.0
Free electives 11.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 12
Mathematics (MATH) course**4.0
Free electives 10.0
 Term Credits14.0
Total Credit: 181.0-184.0


 

Sample Plan of Study (BS)

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 121Calculus I4.0
UNIV S101The Drexel Experience1.0
Computer Science (CS) course sequence*3.0
Any Biology (BIO) course3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
MATH 122Calculus II4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Any Chemistry (CHEM) course3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
MATH 123Calculus III4.0
MATH 200Multivariate Calculus4.0
Computer Science (CS) sequence course*3.0
Any Physics (PHYS) course3.0-4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 4
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
MATH 201Linear Algebra4.0
MATH 220 [WI] Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning3.0
Social Science electives6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
MATH 210Differential Equations4.0
Social Science elective3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**3.0
International Studies or Studies in Diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 6
MATH 331Abstract Algebra I4.0
Humanities elective3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**4.0
Social Science elective3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 7
MATH 332Abstract Algebra II3.0
Humanities elective3.0
International Studies or Studies in Diversity elective3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
MATH 401Elements of Modern Analysis I3.0
Social Science elective3.0
Mathematics (MATH) elective**3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 9
MATH 402Elements of Modern Analysis II3.0
UNIV S201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Mathematics (MATH) electives**7.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 10
Mathematics (MATH) electives**8.0
Free electives7.0-8.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 11
Mathematics (MATH) electives**7.0
Free electives8.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
Mathematics (MATH) electives**6.0
Free electives9.0-10.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Total Credit: 181.0-184.0

Co-op/Career Opportunities

Mathematicians are employed in a variety of capacities in business, industry, and government. Students can combine courses in economics or finance and mathematics to prepare for careers in the actuarial field, banks, stock exchanges, or finance departments of large corporations or other financial institutions. Students interested in science careers may focus on probability and statistics in order to work for industries like pharmaceutical manufacturers. Many others combine math studies with computer science courses to prepare for careers in information systems or engineering.

Teacher certification is also a career option available through a joint program in mathematics and teacher education.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Dual Degree Bachelor’s Programs

Since applied mathematics plays an important role in many different disciplines, mathematics majors often choose to pursue specialization in a second field of study. Students may choose a dual major that involves completing the requirements of two separate majors or they can opt for a minor, which involves completing the major in one field and a smaller set of courses in another.

Dual majors are common in mathematics/computer science and mathematics/physics. Students interested in a dual major should consult with their advisor or contact the assistant department head. Dual majors in other fields are also possible, but early planning and discussions with advisors is essential.

Mathematics Faculty

David M. Ambrose, PhD (Duke University) Associate Department Head. Professor. Applied analysis and computing for systems of nonlinear partial differential equations, especially free-surface problems in fluid dynamics.
Jason Aran, MS (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Jonah D. Blasiak, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Professor. Algebraic combinatorics, representation theory, and complexity theory.
Robert P. Boyer, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Functional analysis, C*-algebras and the theory of group representations.
Patrick Clarke, PhD (University of Miami). Associate Professor. Homological mirror symmetry, Landau-Ginzburg models, algebraic geometry, symplectic geometry.
Ilker Colak, PhD (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona). Visiting Assistant Professor. ODE's. Dynamical Systems, Evolution of Social Behavior.
Daryl Falco, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor. Discrete mathematics and automata theory.
Raymond Favocci, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Pavel Grinfeld, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Associate Professor. Intersection of physics, engineering, applied mathematics and computational science.
Anatolii Grinshpan, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Teaching Professor. Function theory and operator theory, harmonic analysis, matrix theory.
Yixin Guo, PhD (University of Pittsburgh). Associate Professor. Biomathematics, dynamical systems, ordinary and partial differential equations and math education.
R. Andrew Hicks, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Geometry; optics; computer vision.
Pawel Hitczenko, PhD (Warsaw University). Professor. Probability theory and its applications to analysis, combinatorics, wavelets, and the analysis of algorithms.
Robert Immordino, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Dmitry Kaliuzhnyi-Verbovetskyi, PhD (Kharkov University). Professor. Operator theory, systems theory, complex analysis, C*-algebras and harmonic analysis.
Hwan Yong Lee, PhD (University of Utah). Assistant Teaching Professor. Electromagnetic wave propagation in composite media, optimization and inverse problem.
Georgi S. Medvedev, PhD (Boston University). Associate Professor. Ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical neuroscience.
Shari Moskow, PhD (Rutgers University) Department Head. Professor. Partial differential equations and numerical analysis, including homogenization theory, numerical methods for problems with rough coefficients, and inverse problems.
Marna A. Mozeff, MS (Drexel University). Teaching Professor.
Oksana P. Odintsova, PhD (Omsk State University). Teaching Professor. Math education; geometrical modeling.
Dimitrios Papadopoulos, EdD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Joel Pereira, PhD (University of North Carolina). Assistant Teaching Professor. Commutative Algebra.
Ronald K. Perline, PhD (University of California at Berkeley) Undergraduate Advisor. Associate Professor. Applied mathematics, numerical analysis, symbolic computation, differential geometry, mathematical physics.
Marci A. Perlstadt, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Associate Professor. Applied mathematics, computed tomography, numerical analysis of function reconstruction, signal processing, combinatorics.
Brianna Pezzato, MEd (Millersville University). Instructor.
Anna Pun, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Visiting Assistant Professor. Algebraic Combinatorics, Discrete Mathematics, Finite Geometry.
Adam C. Rickert, MS (Drexel University). Associate Teaching Professor.
Valerie Sarris, PhD (Yale University). Instructor.
Eric Schmutz, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Probabilistic combinatorics, asymptotic enumeration.
Li Sheng, PhD (Rutgers University). Associate Professor. Discrete optimization, combinatorics, operations research, graph theory and its application in molecular biology, social sciences and communication networks, biostatistics.
Gideon Simpson, PhD (Columbia University). Associate Professor. Partial differential equations, scientific computing and applied mathematics.
Xiaoming Song, PhD (University of Kansas). Assistant Professor. Stochastic Calculus, Large Deviation Theory, Theoretical Statistics, Data Network Modeling and Numerical Analysis.
Kenneth P. Swartz, PhD (Harvard University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Applied statistics, data analysis, calculus, discrete mathematics, biostatistics.
Vaishalee T. Wadke, MS (Columbia University). Instructor.
Richard D. White, MS (Penn State University). Assistant Teaching Professor.
Hugo J. Woerdeman, PhD (Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam). Professor. Matrix and operator theory, systems theory, signal and image processing, and harmonic analysis.
J. Douglas Wright, PhD (Boston University) Graduate Advisor. Associate Department Head. Professor. Partial differential equations, specifically nonlinear waves and their interactions.
Dennis G. Yang, PhD (Cornell University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Dynamical systems, neurodynamics.
Thomas (Pok-Yin) Yu, PhD (Stanford University). Professor. Multiscale mathematics, wavelets, applied harmonic analysis, subdivision algorithms, nonlinear analysis, applied differential geometry and data analysis.
Matthew Ziemke, PhD (University of South Carolina). Assistant Teaching Professor. Functional Analysis, Operator Algebras, Semigroups, Mathematical Physics.

Emeritus Faculty

Loren N. Argabright, PhD (University of Washington). Professor Emeritus. Functional analysis, wavelets, abstract harmonic analysis, the theory of group representations.
Robert C. Busby, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus. Functional analysis, C*-algebras and group representations, computer science.
Ewaugh Finney Fields, EdD (Temple University) Dean Emeritus. Professor Emeritus. Mathematics education, curriculum and instruction, minority engineering education.
William M.Y. Goh, PhD (Ohio State University). Associate Professor Emeritus. Number theory, approximation theory and special functions, combinatorics, asymptotic analysis.
Bernard Kolman, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor Emeritus. Lie algebras; theory, applications, and computational techniques; operations research.
Charles J. Mode, PhD (University of California at Davis). Professor Emeritus. Probability and statistics, biostatistics, epidemiology, mathematical demography, data analysis, computer-intensive methods.
Chris Rorres, PhD (Courant Institute, New York University). Professor Emeritus. Applied mathematics, scattering theory, mathematical modeling in biological sciences, solar-collection systems.
Patricia Henry Russell, MS (LaSalle University). Teaching Professor.
Justin R. Smith, PhD (Courant Institute, New York University). Professor. Homotopy theory, operad theory, quantum mechanics, quantum computing.
Jet Wimp, PhD (University of Edinburgh). Professor Emeritus. Applied mathematics, special factors, approximation theory, numerical techniques, asymptotic analysis.
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