Communication

Major: Communication
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 180.0
Co-op Options: Three Co-op (Five years); One Co-op (Four years); No Co-op (Four years)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 09.0401; 09.0900; 09.0908; 09.9999; 23.1303
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code:
11-2011; 11-2031; 27-3022; 27-3041; 27-3042; 27-3043

About the Program

The Communication department offers a major in communication, with concentrations in public relations, journalism, technical and science communication, and an open, flexible track.

The department is committed to helping students become broadly educated and professionally competent individuals. Students are exposed to a variety of media and are guided in the development of their interpretive and expressive skills.

All communication majors take a common core of courses that emphasize communication theory and methods. They then specialize in one of three concentrations. Students in the public relations concentration pursue careers in public relations, event planning, media relations, and corporate communication. Those who choose the technical and science communication concentration go on to work in technical writing, science writing, publishing, and software and hardware documentation. Journalism students pursue careers in journalism and news. Many communication graduates also go on to law school, to business school for an MBA, or to graduate school.

Students who elect the public relations concentration have the option of pursuing either a bachelor of arts degree or a bachelor of science degree. Students who elect the technical and science communication concentration must pursue the bachelor of science degree. Students in journalism must complete the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree. Students in the open track complete the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Degree Requirements: Journalism (BA)

Journalism provides students with the skills and theoretical perspective they need to be a journalist in today’s swiftly changing media environment. An extension of the program's core curriculum, the concentration hones the student's ability to write, edit, and produce audiovisual content while at the same time exposing the student to new and evolving aspects of the field.

General Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two mathematics courses 6.0-8.0
Two science courses6.0-8.0
Foreign language courses *7.0-15.0
Humanities and fine arts12.0
Social and behavioral sciences 9.0
International studies6.0
Studies in diversity6.0
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
Journalism Concentration Requirements
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 261Advanced Journalism3.0
COM 266Copy Editing for the Media3.0
COM 315Investigative Journalism3.0
COM 365Journalists, the Courts, and the Law3.0
TVPR 220TV News Writing3.0
Additional Electives
Communication electives 18.0
Free Electives38.0
Total Credits180.0-192.0
*At least one foreign language course must be at the 200-level.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study 

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Foreign language course*4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
Foreign language course *3.0-4.0
Math course3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits13.0-15.0
Term 3
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Math course3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 261Advanced Journalism3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Science course3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 365Journalists, the Courts, and the Law3.0
LING 101
or 102
Introduction to Linguistics
Language and Society
3.0
Free elective3.0
Science course3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
TVPR 220TV News Writing3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
COM 266Copy Editing for the Media3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective 3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
COM elective3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 315Investigative Journalism3.0
Free electives6.0
COM elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 10
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
Humanities elective3.0
Free electives 3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives 5.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Total Credit: 180.0-184.0
*

 See degree requirements.


Degree Requirements: Open Concentration (BA)

Students who select the open track  take courses in all of the existing tracks, as well as other communication courses to prepare them for any communication-related career, or professional post-graduate options.

General Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two mathematics courses 6.0
Two science courses6.0
Foreign language courses *8.0
Humanities/ fine arts 12.0
Social/behavioral science 9.0
International studies 6.0
Studies in diversity6.0
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
Additional Breadth in COM
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
Two additional COM classes at 300 level or higher6.0
Additional Electives
COM electives24.0
Free electives37.0
Total Credits180.0
*

At least one course must be at the 200 level or beyond.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study: Open Concentration (BA)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Foreign language course4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
Math course3.0
Social science elective3.0
Foreign language course*4.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
COM 160
or 181
Introduction to Journalism
Public Relations Principles and Theory
3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Math course3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
COM 181
or 160
Public Relations Principles and Theory
Introduction to Journalism
3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
Science course3.0
Free electives6.0
Humanities elective3.0
 Term Credits18.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
LING 102Language and Society3.0
Science course3.0
Free elective3.0
COM elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
Free elective3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
COM electives6.0
Free elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Humanities elective3.0
Free elective3.0
COM electives6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM elective (above 300 level)3.0
Free electives6.0
Social science elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
Communication elective (above 300 level)3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives7.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
Communication elective3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Social science elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives6.0
COM elective3.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 183.0
*

 See degree requirements.

Degree Requirements: Public Relations (BA) 

The concentration in public relations covers a broad range of activities that help an organization and its public communicate with one another. The field includes public relations, media relations, event planning, publication design, employee and customer communication, and government relations.

Skills in this field include written, oral, and visual communication. A public relations specialist might be called on to write articles for an in-house newsletter, to research and write an annual report to shareholders, to publicize a special event, to write a speech for an executive, to plan a press conference, to develop a media plan for an organization, or to script a video for an employee orientation session.

General Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two mathematics courses 6.0-8.0
Two science courses6.0-8.0
Foreign language courses *8.0
Humanities/ fine arts 12.0
Social/behavioral sciences9.0
International studies 6.0
Studies in diversity electives6.0
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
Public Relations Concentration Requirements
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 201Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
Select one of the following Visual Communication courses:3.0
Electronic Publishing
Desktop Publishing
Additional Electives
COM electives15.0
Free electives36.0
Total Credits180.0-184.0
*

At least one foreign language course must be at the 200-level or above.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study: Public Relations (BA)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Foreign language course*4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
Foreign language course*3.0-4.0
Math course3.0
 Term Credits13.0-15.0
Term 3
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Math course3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Science elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
LING 102Language and Society3.0
Science course3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 6
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
MKTG 201Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
COM elective3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 340
or 335
Desktop Publishing
Electronic Publishing
3.0
Free electives6.0
COM elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 10
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
Humanities elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free elective4.0
 Term Credits13.0
Total Credit: 180.0-184.0
*

 See degree requirements.

Degree Requirements: Public Relations (BS)

The concentration public relations covers a broad range of activities that help an organization and its publics communicate with one another. The field includes public relations, media relations, event planning, publication design, employee and customer communication, and government relations.

Skills in this field include written, oral, and visual communication. A public relations specialist might be called on to write articles for an in-house newsletter, to research and write an annual report to shareholders, to publicize a special event, to write a speech for an executive, to plan a press conference, to develop a media plan for an organization, or to script a video for an employee orientation session.

General Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Humanities and fine arts12.0
Social science 9.0
International studies 6.0
Studies in diversity6.0
Select one of the following Science Sequences:8.0
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics Sequence
General Physics I
General Physics II
Select one of the following Mathematics Sequences8.0
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
Public Relations Concentration Requirements
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
Visual Communication Courses *
Select one of the following:3.0
Electronic Publishing
Desktop Publishing
Additional Electives
COM electives15.0
Free electives40.0
Total Credits180.0
*

Or other courses as appropriate in COM or the College of Media Arts and Design.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study: Public Relations (BS)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Math sequence course 14.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
Math sequence course 24.0
Humanities elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 3
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
International or diversity elective 3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 4
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Science sequence course 1*4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
LING 102Language and Society3.0
Science sequence course 2*4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 8
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Humanities elective3.0
COM elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 340
or 335
Desktop Publishing
Electronic Publishing
3.0
Free electives6.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
COM elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 10
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
Humanities elective 3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM elective3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
COM elective3.0
Free elective4.0
 Term Credits13.0
Total Credit: 180.0-183.0
*

 See degree requirements.

Degree Requirements: Technical & Science Communication (BS)

Students within this track learn to communicate scientific and technical information to various audiences. The program combines courses that develop communication skills with courses that enhance understanding of science and technology.

Students who study technical and science communication find work in a wide range of areas, including technical writing for software or hardware products, proposal and grant writing, and research or writing in the fields of health, pharmaceuticals, medicine or science.

General Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Social and behavioral science9.0
Humanities 9.0
International studies 6.0
Studies in diversity6.0
One of the following Science sequences:8.0
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics Sequence
General Physics I
General Physics II
One of the following Math sequences:8.0
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
Technical and Science Concentration Requirements
COM 160Introduction to Journalism3.0
COM 181Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
COM 320 [WI] Science Writing3.0
COM 335Electronic Publishing3.0
COM 350 [WI] Document Design and Evaluation3.0
COM 420Technical and Science Editing3.0
Technology, Science & Communication Breadth
Select three of the following:9.0
Campaigns for Health & Environment
Environmental Communication
Film, Celebrity and the Environmental Movement
Professional Presentations
Desktop Publishing
Intercultural Communication
Computer Mediated Communication
Social Media and Communication
Ethnography of Communication
Media Effects
Multidisciplinary Breadth
Select three of the following:9.0
Anthropology of Cyberspace
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
History of Science: Ancient to Medieval
History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity
Technology in Historical Perspective
Introduction to Information Technology
Introduction to Informatics
Foundations of Software
Human-Computer Interaction I
Philosophy of Science
Cognitive Psychology
Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering
Human-Computer Interaction
Additional Electives
COM electives15.0
Free electives29.0
Total Credits180.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study 

Technical and Science Communication (BS)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Math course4.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0
Math course4.0
Humanities elective3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
COM 160
or 181
Introduction to Journalism
Public Relations Principles and Theory
3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Humanities elective3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 4
COM 181
or 160
Public Relations Principles and Theory
Introduction to Journalism
3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
Free elective3.0
Multidisciplinary elective3.0
Science course4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
LING 101
or 102
Introduction to Linguistics
Language and Society
3.0
Technology, science and communication elective3.0
Free elective3.0
Science elective4.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
COM 221Quantitative Research Methods in Communication3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
Free elective4.0
Multidisiplinary elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
COM 335Electronic Publishing3.0
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
COM elective3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Technology, science, and communication elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Technology, science, and communication elective3.0
Free elective3.0
Humanities elective3.0
COM elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 320 [WI] Science Writing3.0
COM 350 [WI] Document Design and Evaluation3.0
COM elective 3.0
Free elective 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
COM 420Technical and Science Editing3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM elective3.0
Miultidisciplinary elective3.0
Social science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits12.0-13.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
International or diversity elective3.0
COM elective3.0
Free elective4.0
 Term Credits13.0
Total Credit: 180.0-181.0
*

 See degree requirements.


Co-op/Career Opportunities

Public Relations

Graduates with a concentration in public relations find employment in a wide variety of fields, including public relations, advertising, special events planning, writing and editing, and public information. In addition, the strong communication and management skills stressed by this concentration enable the graduates to find administrative positions in various business areas with an indirect relationship to public relations such as marketing, sales, human resources consulting, or publishing.

Although graduate study is not necessary for those who pursue careers in public relations, students have used the major as a basis for graduate work in a variety of areas, including communication, business, and law.

Co-op Experiences in Public Relations

Cooperative education opportunities are available with a variety of corporations and nonprofits in such positions as corporate communication specialist, public relations assistant, and newsletter writer. The following are samples of past co-op experiences:

  • Advertising and Promotions Assistant, CoreStates Bicycle Championships, Philadelphia.
  • Corporate Communications Co-op, Philadelphia Electric Company, Philadelphia.
  • Advertising/ Promotions Co-op, U.S. Marketing Division, Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA.
  • Assistant Coordinator, Communications Bureau, United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Journalism

Journalism students pursue careers in journalism, creative writing, and news. Given the rapidly changing nature of these fields, graduates may also find work in new types of publishing platforms, such as social media or mobile, or involving audiovisual content creation. Journalism graduates may also choose to pursue graduate study, whether in journalism or another discipline.

Co-op Experiences in Journalism

Journalism students have held co-ops with a number of media, news, and information companies, including the following:

  • Production assistant, WPVI-TV (Channel 6) Philadelphia
  • Staff writer, Delaware County Daily Times
  • Promotions department, WPLY-FM (Y-100)
  • Production assistant, sports department, FOX-29 (WTFX-TV)

Technical and Science Communication

Students who study technical and science communication are prepared for a variety of career options. Many students become technical writers and editors who produce manuals and reports about high-technology products and services. Students may also go on to write specifications and in-house organs for business, industry, and government. Other students conduct and interpret surveys for business. In addition, this program is excellent preparation for graduate study in a number of fields, such as law and medicine.

Co-op Experiences in Technical and Science Communication

Communication students have worked for corporations and nonprofit organizations. The following are some samples of past co-op experiences:

  • Technical writer, Unisys Corp. and Hewlett Packard
  • Web page writer, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
  • Pharmaceutical writer, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Medical writer, Medcases Corp.

Open Communication Track

Students in the Open track will develop  a focus that fits their interests in the field of Communication and will thus be ready for a variety of career options, which can include any of the directions open to students in the other concentrations in communication. In addition, this program is excellent preparation for graduate study in a number of fields, such as law and medicine.

Co-op Experiences in the Open Communication track

Students in this track can choose from the variety of co-op opportunities open to any student in Communication.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Minor in Communication

The minor in communication is a 24.0 credit curriculum designed to familiarize students with communication theory while providing training in print and digital communication. The minor can provide a strong complement for majors that emphasize presentations, interpersonal skills, publicity, and marketing. Students minoring in communication can focus on public relations, journalism, technical and science communication, environmental communication, or nonprofit communication.

Finally, students complete three additional electives from the area that fits their interest. 

Please note: No more than three courses that are required for a student’s major can count towards fulfilling requirements for the minor.

Core Courses
COM 101Human Communication3.0
or COM 111 Principles of Communication
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
Focus Areas6.0
Select one of the following areas of focus (2 courses):
Journalism
Introduction to Journalism
Advanced Journalism
Public Relations
Public Relations Principles and Theory
Business Communication
Public Relations Writing
Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation
Technical and Science Communication
Technical Communication
Science Writing
Grant Writing
Environmental Communication
Campaigns for Health & Environment
Film, Celebrity and the Environmental Movement
Environmental Communication
FOUR Additional Courses
Four COM or LING electives 12.0
Total Credits24.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Communication Faculty

Ronald Bishop, III, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Investigative reporting, sports journalism, journalism history, journalism sourcing patterns, textual narrative and ideological analysis, cultural history of fame.
Joan W. Blumberg, BA (Pennsylvania State University). Instructor. Publishing, electronic publishing, publishing and communications, publishing and mass-media.
Karen Cristiano, MS (Temple University) Assistant Department Head of Communication. Associate Teaching Professor. Journalism, medical writing, feature writing, copy editing, mass media and society.
Richard Forney Instructor. Broadcast journalism technology and the effects of new technologies on personal and corporate communication skills.
Alexander Friedlander, PhD (Carnegie Mellon University) Interim Department Head of Communication; Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, College of Arts and Sciences. Associate Professor. Rhetorical theory and practice, document design, writing and technology.
Ernest A. Hakanen, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Telecommunications policy, adolescent media use, communication theory and history, global media, and semiotics.
Barbara Hoekje, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director, English Language Center. Associate Professor. Sociolinguistic theory, discourse analysis, applied linguistics (language teaching, learning, and testing).
Frank Kelley, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Corporate university systems online, power structure of media enterprises, public relations, event planning.
Julia May, PhD (Drexel University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Political communication; international politics and its news coverage; public opinion; transatlantic relations; war, torture and human rights; debate in the public sphere.
Jordan McClain, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Media framing and music journalism; relationship between television and music; American popular culture; celebrity, consumerism, and consumer behavior; branding, brand positioning, and advertising criticism.
Alexander Nikolaev, PhD (Florida State University) Interim Director, Communication Undergraduate Programs. Associate Professor. Public relations, political communication, organizational communication, mass communication, international communications and negotiations, communications theory.
Rosemary Rys, MA. Instructor. Public relations and marketing.
Lawrence Souder, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technical writing, communication ethics, nonprofit communication.
Allan Stegeman, MA (University of Houston). Teaching Professor. Communication, technology and mass media, video.
Susan Stein, PhD (University of Wisconsin) Graduate Director. Associate Teaching Professor. Science, environmental, and health communication
Asta Zelenkauskaite, PhD (Indiana University). Assistant Professor. Social media; user-generated content; computer-mediated communication; interactivity; active audience analysis; mobile communication; gender and online identity; prosumer culture; internet of things; quantitative/qualitative research.
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