Communication

Major: Communication
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 182.0
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 09.0401; 09.0900; 09.0908; 09.9999
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code:
11-2011; 11-2031; 27-3022; 27-3041; 27-3042; 27-3043

About the Program

The Communication department offers a major in communication, with concentrations in public relations, journalism, and technical and science communication.

The department is committed to helping students become broadly educated and professionally competent individuals. Students are exposed to a variety of media and are guided in the development of their interpretive and expressive skills.

All communication majors take a common core of courses that emphasize communication theory and methods. They then specialize in one of three concentrations. Students in the public relations concentration pursue careers in public relations, event planning, media relations, and corporate communication. Those who choose the technical and science communication concentration go on to work in technical writing, science writing, publishing, and software and hardware documentation. Journalism students pursue careers in journalism and news. Many communication graduates also go on to law school, to business school for an MBA, or to graduate school.

Students who elect the public relations concentration have the option of pursuing either a bachelor of arts degree or a bachelor of science degree. Students who elect the technical and science communication concentration must pursue the bachelor of science degree. Students in journalism must complete the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Degree Requirements: Journalism (BA)

Journalism provides students with the skills and theoretical perspective they need to be a journalist in today’s swiftly changing media environment. An extension of the program's core curriculum, the concentration hones the student's ability to write, edit, and produce audiovisual content while at the same time exposing the student to new and evolving aspects of the field.

General Requirements
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 345Intercultural Communication3.0
or ANTH 312 Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
COM 360International Communication3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Two mathematics courses 6.0-8.0
Two science courses6.0-8.0
Foreign language courses *8.0-16.0
Three humanities and fine arts electives9.0
Two social and behavioral sciences electives6.0-8.0
One international studies elective3.0
One studies in diversity elective3.0
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Journalism Concentration Requirements
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 300 [WI] On-line Journalism3.0
COM 315Investigative Journalism3.0
COM 365Journalists, the Courts, and the Law3.0
COM 390 [WI] Global Journalism3.0
TVPR 220TV News Writing3.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Select one of the following:3.0-4.0
International Politics
International Business Law
International Negotiations
Globalization
Culture and Communication Electives
Communication electives (Any four courses with a COM rubric at the 200-level or higher.)12.0
Additional Electives
Free Electives39.0
Total Credits182.0-197.0
*At least one foreign language course must be at the 200-level.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study 

Journalism (BA)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Math elective3.0-4.0
Foreign language course4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 2
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Foreign language course 4.0
Humanities and fine arts elective3.0
Math elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 3
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Foreign language course/free elective3.0-4.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0-4.0
International studies elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 4
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
LING 102
or 101
Language and Society
Introduction to Linguistics
3.0
Foreign language course/Free elective4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 300 [WI] On-line Journalism3.0
Free elective3.0-4.0
Science elective*3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 6
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 345
or ANTH 312
Intercultural Communication
Approaches to Intercultural Behavior
3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
TVPR 220TV News Writing3.0
Science elective*3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
COM 315Investigative Journalism3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Social and behavioral sciences elective 3.0
Communication elective *3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 365Journalists, the Courts, and the Law3.0
Select one of the following:3.0-4.0
International Business Law 
Globalization 
International Negotiations 
International Politics 
Communication elective *3.0
Diversity studies elective3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 9
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 10
COM 360International Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 390 [WI] Global Journalism3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Free electives 8.0-9.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 182.0-190.0
*

 See degree requirements.


Degree Requirements: Public Relations (BA) 

The concentration in public relations covers a broad range of activities that help an organization and its public communicate with one another. The field includes public relations, media relations, event planning, publication design, employee and customer communication, and government relations.

Skills in this field include written, oral, and visual communication. A public relations specialist might be called on to write articles for an in-house newsletter, to research and write an annual report to shareholders, to publicize a special event, to write a speech for an executive, to plan a press conference, to develop a media plan for an organization, or to script a video for an employee orientation session.

General Requirements
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
COM 360International Communication3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Two mathematics courses 6.0-8.0
Two science courses6.0-8.0
Foreign language courses (at least one must be at the 200-level.)6.0-16.0
Three humanities/ fine arts courses9.0
Two social/behavioral science courses6.0-8.0
One international studies elective3.0
Two studies in diversity electives6.0
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Public Relations Concentration Requirements
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
ORGB 300 [WI] Organizational Behavior4.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Select one of the following Visual Communication courses: *3.0
Electronic Publishing
Desktop Publishing
Communication electives (Any four courses with a COM or LING rubric at the 200-level or higher)12.0
Additional Electives
Free electives36.0
Total Credits182.0
*

Or other courses as appropriate in Communication (COM) or offered by the College of Media Arts and Design.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study: Public Relations (BA)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Mathematics course3.0-4.0
Foreign language course4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 2
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective3.0
Foreign language course*4.0
Mathematics course3.0-4.0
 Term Credits17.0-18.0
Term 3
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Free elective/language*3.0-4.0
International studies elective3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 4
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
Science elective3.0-4.0
Free elective/language6.0-8.0
 Term Credits15.0-18.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
Science elective3.0-4.0
Free elective/language3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 6
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Diversity studies elective3.0
Social and behavioral sciences elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 7
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Diversity studies elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
ORGB 300 [WI] Organizational Behavior4.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
LING 102
or 101
Language and Society
Introduction to Linguistics
3.0
Communication elective*3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
Visual communication elective*3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 10
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
COM 360International Communication3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Humanities/Fine arts elective3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free electives7.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives9.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 182.0-191.0
*

 See degree requirements.

Degree Requirements: Public Relations (BS)

The concentration public relations covers a broad range of activities that help an organization and its publics communicate with one another. The field includes public relations, media relations, event planning, publication design, employee and customer communication, and government relations.

Skills in this field include written, oral, and visual communication. A public relations specialist might be called on to write articles for an in-house newsletter, to research and write an annual report to shareholders, to publicize a special event, to write a speech for an executive, to plan a press conference, to develop a media plan for an organization, or to script a video for an employee orientation session.

General Requirements
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Political Science (PSCI) elective4.0
Economics elective4.0
History elective3.0
Two social and behavioral science electives6.0-8.0
English (ENGL) elective (200-level or above)3.0
Fine arts elective3.0
Philosophy elective3.0
Select one of the following Science Sequences:8.0
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics Sequence
General Physics I
General Physics II
Select one of the following Mathematics Sequences8.0
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Public Relations Concentration Requirements
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
ORGB 300 [WI] Organizational Behavior4.0
LING 101Introduction to Linguistics3.0
or LING 102 Language and Society
Visual Communication Courses *
Select one of the following:3.0
Electronic Publishing
Desktop Publishing
Culture and Communication Electives
Communication Electives (Any four courses with a COM or LING rubric at the 200-level or higher)12.0
Additional Electives
Free Electives38.0
Total Credits181.0-183.0
*

Or other courses as appropriate in COM or the College of Media Arts and Design.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study: Public Relations (BS)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
MATH 121
or 101
Calculus I
Introduction to Analysis I
4.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
MATH 122
or 102
Calculus II
Introduction to Analysis II
4.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
Fine arts elective3.0
History elective 3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Political Science (PSCI) elective 4.0
Free elective3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits16.0-17.0
Term 4
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
Science sequence course 1*4.0
English (ENGL) course (200-level or above) 3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 260 [WI] Fundamentals of Journalism3.0
COM 282 [WI] Public Relations Writing3.0
Science sequence course 2*4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
COM 284Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Communication elective *3.0
Economics (ECON) elective 4.0
Philosophy (PHIL) elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
COM 286Public Relations Strategies and Tactics3.0
Visual Communication elective 3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
ORGB 300 [WI] Organizational Behavior4.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
LING 102
or 101
Language and Society
Introduction to Linguistics
3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits16.0-17.0
Term 9
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 386Public Relations Campaign Planning3.0
MKTG 301Introduction to Marketing Management4.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 10
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
Communication elective 3.0
Free electives8.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 11
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits12.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 181.0-183.0
*

 See degree requirements.

Degree Requirements: Technical & Science Communication (BS)

Students within this track learn to communicate scientific and technical information to various audiences. The program combines courses that develop communication skills with courses that enhance understanding of science and technology.

Students who study technical and science communication find work in a wide range of areas, including technical writing for software or hardware products, proposal and grant writing, and research or writing in the fields of health, pharmaceuticals, medicine or science.

General Requirements
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Political Science (PSCI) elective4.0
Economics elective4.0
History elective3.0
Two social and behavioral science electives6.0
English (ENGL) elective (200-level or above) 3.0
Fine arts elective3.0
Philosophy elective3.0
One of the following Science sequences:8.0
Biology Sequence
Cells, Genetics & Physiology
Cells, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Biological Diversity, Ecology and Evolution Laboratory
Chemistry Sequence
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physics Sequence
General Physics I
General Physics II
One of the following Math sequences:8.0
Analysis Sequence
Introduction to Analysis I
Introduction to Analysis II
Calculus Sequence
Calculus I
Calculus II
Communication Core Requirements
Theory Sequence
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Methods Sequence
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Additional Core Requirements
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Technical and Science Concentration Requirements
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
COM 320 [WI] Science Writing3.0
COM 335Electronic Publishing3.0
COM 340Desktop Publishing3.0
COM 350 [WI] Message Design and Evaluation3.0
COM 420Technical Editing3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Introduction to Linguistics
Language and Society
Select one of the following:3.0
History of Science: Ancient to Medieval
History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity
Technology in Historical Perspective
Select one of the following:3.0
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
Philosophy of Science
Select one of the following:3.0
Cognitive Psychology
Human-Computer Interaction
Culture and Communication electives
Communication Electives (Any four courses with a COM rubric at the 200-level or higher)12.0
Free electives37.0
Additional Electives
Total Credits181.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Sample Plan of Study 

Technical and Science Communication (BS)

Term 1Credits
COM 101Human Communication3.0
COM 150Mass Media and Society3.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
MATH 121
or 101
Calculus I
Introduction to Analysis I
4.0
PSY 101General Psychology I3.0
 Term Credits17.0
Term 2
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
MATH 122
or 102
Calculus II
Introduction to Analysis II
4.0
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
History elective3.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0
 Term Credits14.0
Term 3
COM 280Public Relations Principles and Theory3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
Political Science (PSCI) elective4.0
Social and behavioral science elective3.0
Fine arts elective 3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 4
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
Select one of the following:4.0
Cells, Genetics Physiology (must also register for BIO 108 Lab) 
General Physics I 
General Chemistry I 
Philosophy (PHIL) elective 3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 5
COM 220Qualitative Research Methods3.0
COM 240New Technologies In Communication3.0
SOC 260 [WI] Classical Social Theory3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Literature Science 
Environmental Literature 
Philosophy of Science 
Select one of the following:4.0
Biological Diversity, Ecology Evolution (must also register for BIO 110 Lab) 
General Chemistry II 
General Physics II 
 Term Credits16.0
Term 6
COM 310 [WI] Technical Communication3.0
COM 335Electronic Publishing3.0
Economics (ECON) elective 4.0
English (ENGL) elective 3.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 7
COM 320 [WI] Science Writing3.0
COM 340Desktop Publishing3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 8
COM 420Technical Editing3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
SOC 250Research Methods I3.0
LING 101
or 102
Introduction to Linguistics
Language and Society
3.0
Free elective6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 9
COM 350 [WI] Message Design and Evaluation3.0
SOC 364Computer-Assisted Data Analysis3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
History of Science: Ancient to Medieval 
History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity 
Technology in Historical Perspective 
Communication elective 3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 10
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
PSY 337
or 330
Human-Computer Interaction
Cognitive Psychology
3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free electives 4.0
 Term Credits13.0
Term 11
COM 400Seminar in Communication3.0
COM 491Senior Project in Communication I3.0
PHIL 305Communication Ethics3.0
Communication elective*3.0
Free elective 3.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
COM 492Senior Project in Communication II3.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits12.0
Total Credit: 181.0
*

 See degree requirements.


Co-op/Career Opportunities

Public Relations

Graduates with a concentration in public relations find employment in a wide variety of fields, including public relations, advertising, special events planning, writing and editing, and public information. In addition, the strong communication and management skills stressed by this concentration enable the graduates to find administrative positions in various business areas with an indirect relationship to public relations such as marketing, sales, human resources consulting, or publishing.

Although graduate study is not necessary for those who pursue careers in public relations, students have used the major as a basis for graduate work in a variety of areas, including communication, business, and law.

Co-op Experiences in Public Relations

Cooperative education opportunities are available with a variety of corporations and nonprofits in such positions as corporate communication specialist, public relations assistant, and newsletter writer. The following are samples of past co-op experiences:

  • Advertising and Promotions Assistant, CoreStates Bicycle Championships, Philadelphia.
  • Corporate Communications Co-op, Philadelphia Electric Company, Philadelphia.
  • Advertising/ Promotions Co-op, U.S. Marketing Division, Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA.
  • Assistant Coordinator, Communications Bureau, United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Journalism

Journalism students pursue careers in journalism, creative writing, and news. Given the rapidly changing nature of these fields, graduates may also find work in new types of publishing platforms, such as social media or mobile, or involving audiovisual content creation. Journalism graduates may also choose to pursue graduate study, whether in journalism or another discipline.

Co-op Experiences in Journalism

Journalism students have held co-ops with a number of media, news, and information companies, including the following:

  • Production assistant, WPVI-TV (Channel 6) Philadelphia
  • Staff writer, Delaware County Daily Times
  • Promotions department, WPLY-FM (Y-100)
  • Production assistant, sports department, FOX-29 (WTFX-TV)

Technical and Science Communication

Students who study technical and science communication are prepared for a variety of career options. Many students become technical writers and editors who produce manuals and reports about high-technology products and services. Students may also go on to write specifications and in-house organs for business, industry, and government. Other students conduct and interpret surveys for business. In addition, this program is excellent preparation for graduate study in a number of fields, such as law and medicine.

Co-op Experiences in Technical and Science Communication

Communication students have worked for corporations and nonprofit organizations. The following are some samples of past co-op experiences:

  • Technical writer, Unisys Corp. and Hewlett Packard
  • Web page writer, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
  • Pharmaceutical writer, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Medical writer, Medcases Corp.

Visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center page for more detailed information on co-op and post-graduate opportunities.

Minor in Communication

The minor in communication is a 24.0 credit curriculum designed to familiarize students with communication theory while providing training in print and digital communication. The minor can provide a strong complement for majors that emphasize presentations, interpersonal skills, publicity, and marketing. Students minoring in communication can focus on public relations, journalism, technical and science communication, environmental communication, or nonprofit communication.

Finally, students complete three additional electives from the area that fits their interest. 

Please note: No more than three courses that are required for a student’s major can count towards fulfilling requirements for the minor.


Core Courses
COM 210Theory and Models of Communication3.0
COM 380Special Topics in Communication Theory3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Human Communication
Principles of Communication
Focus Areas6.0
Select one of the following areas of focus (2 courses):
Journalism
Fundamentals of Journalism
Select one of the following:
On-line Journalism
Investigative Journalism
Global Journalism
Corporate and Public Relations
Public Relations Principles and Theory
Select one of the following:
Business Communication
Public Relations Writing
Public Relations Research, Measurement and Evaluation
Technical and Science Communication
Technical Communication
Select one of the following:
Science Writing
Grant Writing
Environmental Communication
Environmental Communication
Select one of the following:
Campaigns for Health & Environment
Film, Celebrity and the Environmental Movement
Three Additional Courses
Three Communication (COM) or Linguistics (LING) Electives 9.0
Total Credits24.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Center. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

Culture and Communication Faculty

Ronald Bishop, III, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Investigative reporting, sports journalism, journalism history, journalism sourcing patterns, textual narrative and ideological analysis, cultural history of fame.
Joan W. Blumberg, BA (Pennsylvania State University) Coordinator of the Publication Management Program. Instructor. Publishing, electronic publishing, publishing and communications, publishing and mass-media.
Robert J. Brulle, PhD (George Washington University). Professor. Environmental policy and politics, critical theory, marine risk, social movements, environmental sociology.
Karen Cristiano, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Journalism, medical writing, feature writing, copy editing, mass media and society.
Robert D'Ovidio, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. The intersection of computer technology, crime, and the criminal justice system.
Daniela De Pau, PhD (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). Assistant Teaching Professor. Italian cinema, relationship between literature, cinema and other arts, traveling literature, women writers, the tradition of the Comic and the tradition of the Fantastic, autobiography, politics of immigration, cultural identity in contemporary Italy.
Brenda Dyer, MA (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Language acquisition pedagogy, teaching writing, seventeenth and eighteenth century French literature, women writers, translation.
Mary Ebeling, PhD (University of Surrey). Associate Professor. Science and technology studies; emerging technologies and biocapital; media and democratic cultures; radical social movements; sociology of markets; political sociology; and ethnographic methodologies.
Paul Evangelista, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Public relations, communication theory, new technologies in communication (classroom and online); business communication.
Richard Forney Instructor. Broadcast journalism technology and the effects of new technologies on personal and corporate communication skills.
Alexander Friedlander, PhD (Carnegie Mellon University) Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences. Associate Professor. Rhetorical theory and practice, document design, writing and technology.
Anthony Glascock, PhD (University of Pittsburgh) Coordinator of the Anthropology Program. Professor. Aging and health, definitions of functionality and impairment, technology and aging, social organization, Ireland, East Africa.
Ernest A. Hakanen, PhD (Temple University) Director of Culture & Communication Graduate Programs. Professor. Telecommunications policy, adolescent media use, communication theory and history, global media, and semiotics.
Julia Hall, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. Criminal justice and juvenile justice reform, including community based alternatives to incarceration, correctional education and programming, reentry and reintegration, restorative justice, and issues relating to special needs offenders, including the el
Barbara Jean Hoekje, PhD (University of Pennsylvania) Director of English Language Center. Associate Professor. Sociolinguistic theory, discourse analysis, applied linguistics (language teaching, learning, and testing).
Barbara Hornum, PhD (Bryn Mawr College) Director of Center for Academic Excellence (DCAE). Associate Professor. Comparative gerontology, planned communities, continuing care communities, retirement, faculty development.
Robert J. Kane, PhD (Temple University) Director, Criminal Justice Program. Professor. Police authority and accountability; urban ecology and sociology; violence and public health; police strategies and practices.
Frank Kelley, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Corporate university systems online, power structure of media enterprises, public relations, event planning.
Emmanuel F. Koku, PhD (University of Toronto). Associate Professor. Social network analysis; qualitative/quantitative research; medical sociology; social epidemiology; social demography; sociology of development; communication and information technology; community and urban sociology.
David Kutzik, PhD (Temple University) Coordinator of the Sociology Program. Professor. Sociology and philosophy of science; applied gerontological research; political economy of health care; microprocessor-based assistive technologies to improve case management and increase independent living among frail populations.
Brent Luvaas, PhD (UCLA). Assistant Professor. DIY and independent media production; transnational consumer culture; popular music; new media and mediated subjectivities; youth culture in the US and Indonesia.
Joanna Lyskowicz, MA (UAM Poznan, Poland). Instructor. Comparative linguistics, translation, business Spanish, medical Spanish, modern Spanish literature, XXth cent. Spanish poetry, magical realism in Latin American literature.
Diamantino Machado, PhD (Temple University). Teaching Professor. Globalization, political economy, political sociology, philosophy of social science, postmodernism and social reflection.
Maria delaluz Matus-Mendoza, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. Spanish Linguistic variation in the US; the relationship between language variation and mobility (social and geographical) among the Mexican communities in Mexico and in the United States; second language acquisition; language variation in media.
Jack Maxwell, MS (Saint Joseph 's University). Teaching Professor. Criminal investigations, policing, police administration, domestic violence.
Jordan McClain, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Media framing and music journalism; relationship between television and music; American popular culture; celebrity, consumerism, and consumer behavior; branding, brand positioning, and advertising criticism.
Margaret McClure, PhD (University of California at Berkeley). Assistant Teaching Professor. Research methods, sociology of the family, deviance, military sociology.
Usha Menon, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Self, identity & personhood, emotional functioning, Hindu morality, gender relations in Hindu society, adult development, popular Hinduism, post-colonial feminism, Hindu religious nationalism and Islamic radicalism.
Alexander Nikolaev, PhD (Florida State University). Associate Professor. Public relations, political communication, organizational communication, mass communication, international communications and negotiations, communications theory.
Anne-Marie Obajtek-Kirkwood, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Professor. French and francophone 20th and 21st century literature, culture and film. Representations of the Occupation (WWII); war; minorities in France; autobiography; feminist issues.
Rakhmiel Peltz, PhD (Columbia University, Linguistics; University of Pennsylvania, Biological Sciences) Director of Judaic Studies Program. Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, social history of Yiddish language and culture, Yiddish culture of Eastern Europe, language planning, language and ethnic identity, language and group memory, aging and ethnicity, history of urban neighbors.
Douglas V. Porpora, PhD (Temple University). Professor. International political economy, culture, social theory, and philosophy of social science.
Robert Powell, PhD (Temple University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Early and Middle Bronze Age Crete; archaeoastronomy; early state formation; archaeology and anthropology of frontiers; mass communication.
Devon Powers, PhD (New York University). Assistant Professor. Popular music, cultural intermediaries, promotional culture, 20th-century history, journalism studies.
Rachel R. Reynolds, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago). Associate Professor. Sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, intercultural communication, globalization and the rhetoric of community, political economy of immigration, race and ethnicity, new African immigrants in the United States, Igbo studies.
Cynthia Reed Rickards, MS (St. Joesph's University) Criminal Justice Program. Assistant Teaching Professor. On-line pedagogy; service-learning pedagogy; juvenile justice; domestic violence.
David Ridgway, MS (St. Joseph's University). Instructor. Deviant behaviors, social problems.
Rosemary Rys, MA (Glassboro State College (now Rowan University)). Instructor. Public relations and marketing.
Simone Schlichting-Artur, EdD (University of Pennsylvania) Assistant Department Head, Culture and Communication. Teaching Professor. International business communication (Germany and the U.S.), public health policy and languages, German post-war history through film and literature, development of writing assessment tools for German minor.
Mimi Sheller, PhD (New School for Social Research) Director of the Mobilities Research and Policy Center at Drexel University. Professor. Sustainable mobility and mobility justice: new cultures and infrastructures of travel, transport, mobile communication, and urbanism; Caribbean Studies: history, culture and political theory of the region, including intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class.
Natsumi Shor Assistant Teaching Professor. Business and professional Japanese; Japanese film and culture; interrelation between Japanese language to the nation’s culture and thought.
Wesley Shumar, PhD (Temple University) Department Head, Culture and Communication. Professor. Ethnography of cyberspace, online learning communities, political economy of higher education, globalization, activity theory, semiotics, critical realism, psychoanalysis, identity and the self.
Diane Sicotte, PhD (Arizona State University). Associate Professor. Sociology of environmental injustice: inequalities in the citing of environmental hazards; community-based research in neighborhoods dealing with industrial hazards; sociology of the environment; urban sociology; social inequalities.
Lawrence Souder, PhD (Temple University). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technical writing, communication ethics.
Allan Stegeman, MA (University of Houston) Coordinator of the Communication Program. Teaching Professor. Communication, technology and mass media, video.
Judith Storniolo, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Teaching Professor. Historical and comparative linguistics, Mesoamerican languages and culture, applied anthropology, public policy, oral traditions and narratives, ideology and ritual, Mesoamerican ethnohistory; and pre-Columbian literature.
Asta Zelenkauskaite, PhD (Indiana University). Assistant Professor. Social media; user-generated content; computer-mediated communication; interactivity; active audience analysis; mobile communication; gender and online identity; prosumer culture; internet of things; quantitative/qualitative research.

Interdepartmental Faculty

Tony H. Grubesic, PhD (The Ohio State University) Director of the Center for Spatial Analytics and Geocomputation (CSAG). Professor. Geographic information science, spatial analysis, development, telecommunication policy, location modeling.
Michelle Sahl, PhD, MEd, MBA, MBE (The University of the Sciences in Philadelphia). Associate Teaching Professor. Health management and policy: management and leadership of health services organizations, urban health, and the history of health care systems.
  • Schedule of Classes
  • All Course Descriptions
  • Co-op
  • Academic Advising
  • Admissions
  • Tuition & Fees
LEARN MORE