Global Studies BA / Strategic & Digital Communication MS

Major: Global Studies and Strategic and Digital Communication
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Master of Science (MS)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Minimum Required Credits: 225.0
Co-op Options: One Co-op (Five years)
BA Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code:
 30.2001
BA Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code: 19-3094
MS Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code:
 09.0909
BAMS Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code: 11-2011

About the Program

The accelerated BA in Global Studies provides students with an interdisciplinary, intercultural, and interactive program with four concentrations: media, arts and cultures; justice and human rights; business, economics, and development; and health and sustainability. Global Studies students develop the critical skills to understand global political, social, and economic trends, while the MS in Strategic and Digital Communication addition will further deepen students’ practical and professional experience in the communications field.

Drexel University is committed to building a strong foundation through the accelerated Global Studies/Communication degree, which enables academically qualified students to earn both a bachelor's and master’s degree—graduating sooner than they would in traditional programs. Graduates of the accelerated degree enter the workforce one year sooner with the benefits of a Master’s degree in Strategic and Digital Communication, using the year saved to gain full-time experience and earn a salary in the field.

Drexel’s Master of Science in Strategic and Digital Communication requires 45.0 credits, and prepares students for careers in a wide range of professional activities relating to communication in both media environments and communication contexts that are characterized by advanced digitization.

With a robust core curriculum consisting of seven courses (21.0 credits), the program provides a strong foundation in theoretical approaches to communication, ethics and media/communication policy. This theoretical basis is designed to ensure that, as the field changes, students will continue to have an intellectual framework for evaluating and implementing new technology and changing media environments. Furthermore, the program trains students in leadership skills that will help them to lead teams to be innovative communication professionals in digitized media environments and different organizational communication contexts.

The program emphasizes flexibility, encouraging each student, in consultation with a faculty advisor, to craft an individual course of study tailored to the student’s individual interests and career goals. Throughout the curriculum students use four Communication electives (12.0 credits) to increase communication skills or to further develop areas of specialization. An additional four free elective courses (12.0 credits) can be taken in Communication or in other departments across the university. This allows students to continue to tailor their plan of study, to add on a graduate minor, or to complete a certificate program.

The program specializes in two areas:

  • Strategic Communication (public relations)
  • Digital and Social Media Communication

Strategic Communication

Strategic Communication has much to offer for those looking to work in public relations as well as for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Students typically choose from courses such as PR Writing and Planning courses, Crisis Communication, Media Relations, Nonprofit Communication, and others.

Digital Communication

With Communication being an area characterized by ongoing digitization, the program offers courses such as Strategic Social Media Communication, Digital Publishing, Digital Media Environments, Social Media Concepts That Matter, and others.

Additional Information

For more information, visit the MS in Strategic and Digital Communication webpage.

Contact Julia May, Director of the MS in Strategic and Digital Communication program, at julia.may@drexel.edu for more information.

Admission Requirements

Both incoming freshmen and current GST students are eligible to apply for this program. Students who are already matriculated may apply after completing a minimum of 90.0 credits but no more than 120.0 credits. Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and maintain this GPA throughout the program.

In addition to formally applying, already matriculated applicants must provide:

  • The name of two faculty references who can speak to the applicant’s academic qualifications and preparedness for graduate studies.
  • A writing sample consisting of a written response to a series of questions about the applicant's interest in the program.
  • A brief 2-3-minute video in which the applicant introduces himself/herself to the admissions committee and discusses their career goals.

Applicants who already received preliminary acceptance in the accelerated degree program as freshmen should finish the application process after completing a minimum of 90.0 undergraduate credits but no more than 120.0 credits with a GPA of 3.0. Students accepted as incoming freshmen need to submit:

  • The name of one faculty reference who can speak to the applicant's academic qualifications and preparedness for graduate studies. The admissions committee might request the name of a second reference as needed. 
  • A writing sample consisting of a written response to a series of questions about the applicant's interest in the program.

Applications are due by the end of week 6 for a program start in the following quarter. Example: If you intend to start the program in the Winter quarter, your application is due by the end of week 6 in the Fall quarter. Please reach out to the program director, Dr. Julia May, as soon as you decide to apply so we can assist you throughout the application process.  

Additional Information

Contact Julia May, Director of the MS in Strategic and Digital Communication program, at julia.may@drexel.edu for more information. 

Degree Requirements

CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
COOP 101Career Management and Professional Development *1.0
ECON 201Principles of Microeconomics4.0
ECON 202Principles of Macroeconomics4.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
or ENGL 111 English Composition I
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
or ENGL 112 English Composition II
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
or ENGL 113 English Composition III
PSCI 150International Politics4.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two mathematics (MATH 100-499) courses6.0-8.0
Two science courses: BIO, CHEM, ENSS, ENVS, FDSC, GEO, NFS, PHEV, PHYS (100-499)6.0-8.0
Global Studies Core Requirements
GST 101Becoming Global: Language and Cultural Context4.0
GST 102Understanding Global: Markets and Governance4.0
Three 200+ level GST courses12.0
GST 400Senior Project in Global Studies4.0
Language minor in Spanish, French, or Japanese, or minor in Asian Studies, or Middle East and North Africa Studies 24.0
Students must complete at least 24.0 credits above the 103 language level to earn a language minor. Language courses could count towards free electives in some instances; consult with an advisor.
Concentration (Select one) 91.0-95.0 credits
See additional concentration options below
Global Health and Sustainability Concentration Requirements
PBHL 101Public Health 1013.0
PBHL 303Overview of Issues in Global Health3.0
PSCI 334Politics of Environment and Health4.0
or SOC 346 Environmental Justice
SOC 244Sociology of the Environment4.0
or SOC 340 Globalization
Choose one of the following Ethics courses3.0
Public Health Ethics
Biomedical Ethics
Environmental Ethics
Choose one of the following English courses3.0
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
Topics in Literature and Medicine
Global Health and Sustainability Distribution Options24.0
Students must complete 24.0 credits from the approved list:
Biological Diversity, Ecology & Evolution
Ethnobotany
Environmental Crime
Campaigns for Health & Environment
Environmental Communication
Science Writing
Grant Writing
The Kitchen Garden: Summer
The Kitchen Garden: Fall
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Resource and Environmental Economics
Literature & Science
Environmental Literature
Topics in Literature and Medicine
Introduction to Urban Planning
Cities and Sustainability
Energy Entrepreneurship
Environmental Science
Native Plants and Sustainability
Global Climate Change
Global Warming, Biodiversity and Your Future
Conservation Biology
Introduction to Global Capital and Development
Introduction to Identities and Communities
Introduction to Power and Resistance
Introduction to Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Introduction to Global Health and Sustainability
Advanced Studies in Global Capital and Development
Advanced Studies in Identities and Communities
Advanced Studies in Power and Resistance
Advanced Studies in Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Advanced Studies in Global Health and Sustainability
Special Topics in Global Studies
Special Topics in Global Studies
History of Science: Ancient to Medieval
History of Science: Medieval to Enlightenment
History of Science: Enlightenment to Modernity
Themes in Global Environmental History
Empire and Environment
Transnational History of Science, Technology and Environment
Development of World Health Care
Health Care across Cultures
Foods and Nutrition of World Cultures
Perspectives in World Nutrition
Epidemiology in Public Health
Introduction to the History of Public Health
Introduction to Health & Human Rights
Women and Children: Health & Society
Introduction to Community Health
The World's Water
Exploring the HIV/AIDS Pandemic
Disease Outbreak Investigations
Health Inequality
Adapting to a Hotter Climate: Protecting Health of Vulnerable Populations
Biomedical Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Environmental Philosophy
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Science
Global Governance
Environmental Politics
Social Development: A Global Approach
Politics of Environment and Health
Political Economy of Climate Change
Cities and Climate Change
The United Nations in World Politics
Ethics and International Relations
International Human Rights
Psychology of Sustainability
Innovation and Social Justice
Sociology of Global Health
Development and Underdevelopment in the Global South
Globalization
Women's Health and Human Rights
Women and Society in a Global Context
Free electives51.0-47.0
MS Strategic & Digital Communication
Required Core Courses
COM 500Reading & Research in Communication3.0
COM 574Organizational Communication in Project Management3.0
COM 610Theories of Communication and Persuasion3.0
COM 613Ethics for Professional Communication3.0
COM 615Media Environments in a Digital World3.0
COM 651Media and Communication Policy in a Digitized World3.0
COM 698Managing Communication Professional Identities in a Digital Age3.0
Program Electives12.0
Choose four of the following courses:
Campaigns for Health and Environment
Communicating Health and Risk in a ‘Fake News’ World
Science Writing
Document Design and Usability
Modern Desktop Publishing
Digital Publishing
Strategic Social Media Communication
Copy Editing
Foundations of Public Relations
Public Relations Writing
Public Relations Planning
Media Relations in a Digital Age
Crisis Communication
Creative Content Production
Fundamentals of Journalism & Newswriting
International Negotiations
Event Planning
Technical, Science and Health Editing
Grant Writing
Nonprofit Communications
Communication for Civic Engagement
Focus Groups
Strategic International Communication
Graduate Seminar in Communication
Social Media Concepts that Matter
Investigative Journalism
Medical Writing
Medical Journalism
Independent Study in COM
Independent Study in COM
Special Topics in Communication
Special Topics in Communication
Graduate Electives **12.0
Total Credits225.0

Concentration Options

Global Media, Arts, and Cultures Concentration
Media, Arts, and Cultures Distribution Requirements
ANTH 330Media Anthropology3.0
ENGL 325Topics in World Literature3.0
LING 102Language and Society3.0
or ENGL 323 Literature and Other Arts
PHIL 305Ethics and the Media3.0
WEST 100Introduction to Digital Design Tools3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Asian Art and Culture
Art of India
Art of China
Nineteenth Century Art
20th Century Art
Contemporary Art
African-American Art
African Art
Latin American Art
Media, Arts, and Cultures Distribution Options24.0
Students must complete at least 24.0 distribution credits from the approved list
Digital Ethnography
Architecture and Society I
Current Events in Media and Communication
Global Material Culture
Theory and Models of Communication
Media and Identity
Diversity in Media
English Worldwide
Intercultural Communication
Ethnography of Communication
Strategic International Communication
Grant Writing
Nonprofit Communication
Communication for Civic Engagement
Media Effects
Culture and Gastronomy I
Classical to Medieval Literature
Renaissance to the Enlightenment
Survey of World Literature
Post-Colonial Literature
Literature & Science
Literature and Other Arts
Topics in World Literature
Mythology
Literature and Society
Special Topics in Film Studies
Introduction to Global Capital and Development
Introduction to Identities and Communities
Introduction to Power and Resistance
Introduction to Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Introduction to Global Health and Sustainability
Advanced Studies in Global Capital and Development
Advanced Studies in Identities and Communities
Advanced Studies in Power and Resistance
Advanced Studies in Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Special Topics in Global Studies
Special Topics in Global Studies
Introduction to Music
World Musics
Afro-American Music USA
Perspectives in World Nutrition
Metaphysics: Philosophy of Reality
Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
Social & Political Philosophy
Global Ethical Issues
Philosophy of Religion
History of Political Thought
Public Opinion & Propaganda
Political Communication
Race, Ethnicity and Social Inequality
Globalization
Electives53.0-49.0
Global Business, Economics, and Development Concentration
BLAW 340International Business Law4.0
ECON 342Economic Development4.0
ENGL 308 [WI] The Literature of Business3.0
PHIL 301Business Ethics3.0
PSCI 255International Political Economy4.0
Select one of the following:4.0
Multinational Corporations
International Trade
International Money and Finance
Global Business, Economics, and Development Distribution Options24.0
Students must complete at least 24.0 distribution credits from the approved list
Business Communication
Intercultural Communication
Strategic International Communication
International Negotiations
Grant Writing
Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Economic Ideas
International Macroeconomics
Resource and Environmental Economics
Topics in World Literature
Literature and Society
Social Entrepreneurship
Global Entrepreneurship
Energy Entrepreneurship
Introduction to Finance
Global Financial Management
Introduction to Global Capital and Development
Introduction to Power and Resistance
Introduction to Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Introduction to Global Health and Sustainability
Advanced Studies in Global Capital and Development
Advanced Studies in Identities and Communities
Advanced Studies in Power and Resistance
Advanced Studies in Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Advanced Studies in Global Health and Sustainability
Special Topics in Global Studies
Special Topics in Global Studies
History of Capitalism
Multinational Corporations
International Trade
International Money and Finance
Regional Studies in Economic Policies and International Business
For-Profit Business Consulting
Nonprofit Business Consulting
International Business Consulting
Introduction to Marketing Management
Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communications
Marketing for Non-Profit Organizations
Political Economy of Climate Change
The United Nations in World Politics
Ethics and International Relations
Wealth and Power
Development and Underdevelopment in the Global South
Globalization
Classical Social Theory
Imagining Multiple Democracies
Introduction to Business Statistics
Introduction to Business Statistics
Business Statistics II
Women and Society in a Global Context
Electives49.0-45.0
Global Justice and Human Rights Concentration Requirements
ENGL 360 [WI] Literature and Society3.0
PHIL 335Global Ethical Issues3.0-4.0
or PSCI 352 Ethics and International Relations
PSCI 120History of Political Thought4.0
or PSCI 229 Theories of Justice
PSCI 351The United Nations in World Politics4.0
PSCI 353International Human Rights4.0
SOC 330Development and Underdevelopment in the Global South4.0
or SOC 340 Globalization
Global Justice and Human Rights Distribution Options24.0
Students must complete at least 24.0 distribution credits from the approved list
Special Topics in Africana Studies
Race, Crime, and Justice
Justice in Our Community
Prison, Society and You
Places of Justice
Terrorism
Comparative Justice Systems
Strategic International Communication
International Public Relations
Grant Writing
The Kitchen Garden: Summer
The Kitchen Garden: Fall
Microeconomics
Macroeconomics
Economic Development
Resource and Environmental Economics
Topics in World Literature
Introduction to Global Capital and Development
Introduction to Identities and Communities
Introduction to Power and Resistance
Introduction to Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Introduction to Global Health and Sustainability
Advanced Studies in Global Capital and Development
Advanced Studies in Identities and Communities
Advanced Studies in Power and Resistance
Advanced Studies in Global Media, Arts, and Cultures
Advanced Studies in Global Health and Sustainability
Special Topics in Global Studies
Special Topics in Global Studies
Transnational History of Science, Technology and Environment
Comparative Legal Institutions
Immigration Law
Overview of Issues in Global Health
Introduction to Health & Human Rights
Social & Political Philosophy
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Theories of Justice
Comparative Politics II
American Foreign Policy
Global Governance
International Political Economy
Power in Protest: Social Movements in Comparative Perspective
Social Development: A Global Approach
Civilians in Armed Conflict
The United Nations in World Politics
Ethics and International Relations
The Politics of LGBT Movements and Rights
Innovation and Social Justice
Race, Ethnicity and Social Inequality
Wealth and Power
Globalization
Environmental Justice
Classical Social Theory
Social Movements
Women and Society in a Global Context
Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies
Electives44.0-49.0
*

Co-op cycles may vary. Students are assigned a co-op cycle (fall/winter, spring/summer, summer-only) based on their co-op program (4-year, 5-year) and major.

COOP 101 registration is determined by the co-op cycle assigned and may be scheduled in a different term. Select students may be eligible to take COOP 001 in place of COOP 101.

**

Students can select up to 12.0 credits of graduate-level electives (500-799) in the following subject areas: AADM, AAML, ACCT, BUSN, CCM, CHP, COM, CRTV, CW, DIGM, ECON, EDAM, EDHE, EDLT, EDUC, ENTP, ENVP, ENVS, EOH, HMP, HRM, LING, MGMT, MKTG, MUSL, NPM, ORGB, PBHL, PLCY, PROJ, PRST, RMER, SCRP, SCTS, SMT, TVMN. Other graduate courses outside these areas might be taken pending approval from the graduate advisor or program director.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Program. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term.

Sample Plan of Study

4+1, 1 co-op (Accelerated program completed in 5 years)

Students complete undergraduate requirements in four years, then convert to graduate status in the fifth and final year.

First Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
ENGL 101 or 1113.0ENGL 102 or 1123.0CIVC 1011.0VACATION
GST 1014.0GST 1024.0ENGL 103 or 1133.0 
UNIV H1011.0(UG) Language*4.0PSCI 1504.0 
(UG) Language*4.0(UG) MATH Course 23.0-4.0(UG) Free elective3.0 
(UG) MATH Course 13.0-4.0 (UG) Language*4.0 
 15-16 14-15 15 0
Second Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
COOP 101**1.0(UG) Free Elective4.0ECON 2014.0ECON 2024.0
(UG) Free Electives6.0(UG) GST Concentration Requirement3.0(UG) Free elective3.0(UG) Free Elective6.0
(UG) GST Concentration Requirement3.0(UG) GST Distribution Options6.0(UG) GST 200+ Level Course4.0(UG) GST Concentration Requirement3.0
(UG) GST Distribution Option3.0(UG) Language*4.0(UG) GST Concentration Requirement3.0(UG) GST Distribution Option3.0
(UG) Language*4.0 (UG) Language*4.0 
 17 17 18 16
Third Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
(UG) GST 200+ Level Course4.0(UG) Free Elective4.0COOP EXPERIENCECOOP EXPERIENCE
(UG) GST Distribution Options7.0(UG) GST Concentration Requirement4.0 COM 5743.0
(UG) Language*4.0(UG) GST Distribution Option3.0  
COM 5003.0(UG) Language*4.0  
 COM 6103.0  
 18 18 0 3
Fourth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCreditsSummerCredits
UNIV H2011.0GST 4004.0(UG) Free Electives9.0Student converts to Graduate status
(UG) GST 200+ Level Course4.0(UG) Free Electives9.0(UG) GST Distribution Option3.0 
(UG) GST Concentration Requirement4.0COM 6513.0COM 6153.0 
(UG) Language Course4.0(GR) SDC Program Elective3.0(GR) SDC Program Elective3.0 
COM 6133.0   
 16 19 18 0
Fifth Year
FallCreditsWinterCreditsSpringCredits 
(GR) Graduate Electives6.0(GR) Graduate Elective3.0COM 6983.0 
(GR) SDC Program Elective3.0(GR) SDC Program Elective3.0(GR) Graduate Elective3.0 
 9 6 6 
Total Credits 225-227
*

Language minor in French, Spanish or Japanese, or minor in Asian Studies, or Middle East and North Africa Studies.

**

Co-op cycles may vary. Students are assigned a co-op cycle (fall/winter, spring/summer, summer-only) based on their co-op program (4-year, 5-year) and major.

COOP 101 registration is determined by the co-op cycle assigned and may be scheduled in a different term. Select students may be eligible to take COOP 001 in place of COOP 101.

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